• Welcome! It’s great to see you.

    If you'd like to talk with people who know what it's like

    Our forum members are people, maybe like yourself, who experience mental health difficulties or who have had them at some point in their life.

Psychologist/therapist for what Psychiatrist doesnt do?

A

Alatariel

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
7
does anyone see both? I have a great psychiatrist, he really gets me. But there are things about my disorder that aren't 'bad' enough for him to deal with. I'm not saying he doesn't care, I'm saying he cares about me being in one piece and functioning and so that doesnt often leave time for other stuff.

So I was thinking of seeing a psychologist about my self esteem issues and body issues, and eating issues, and relationship issues... I'm overweight and a big time binge-eater and have severe dysmorphia. I refuse to date because anyone who would actually be interested in me MUST be a loser, by virtue of being interested, KWIM?

This isnt life threatening stuff. It's just stuff I want to work on.

Should I cheat on my shrink? (of course , I'd tell him, and the therapist that about each other)
 
trombone_babe

trombone_babe

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
1,191
Location
Kent
If you're worried what your psychiatrist might think, why not ask him for a recommendation, explaining what it is you want like you have here?
 
A

Alatariel

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
7
Oh, I'm not worried about what he would think, he would be fine, I'm just wondering if splitting your care between two providers is a good idea or not?
 
trombone_babe

trombone_babe

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
1,191
Location
Kent
Maybe still the best answer is to ask him what he thinks, I'm sure he would say if he thought it a bad idea.
 
R

rasselas

Guest
...

They can interact. In one of three ways:

NEUTRALLY: There is a happy co-existence. Neither your appointments with the psychiatrist nor the psychologist affect the other. They progress independently. Continuing with both undermines neither.

NEGATIVELY: Issues arising from psychiatric treatment interact negatively with psychological treatment. Or issues arising from psychological treatment interact negatively with psychiatric treatment. Your problems worsen. Continuing both undermines one of the two treatments.

POSITIVELY: Issuses arising from the two treatments are managed succesfully by both providers and your problems improve.

---

Psychology isn't easy. Whatever approach they take. Most approaches these days are not about dwelling on the past and like being in confessional - although inevitably, especially early on, there is going to be some difficult ground to cover. This can prove very difficult for some people - they can question why they are doing it and may consider dropping out. The important thing I think is to give it a chance, and after say 5-10 hours of psychologist time, decide if overall you feel the direction you are going in is neutral, negative or positive. It is also worth being open about your feelings regarding how you feel it's going. This is usually encouraged but it's still worth keeping in mind that it's worth it.

At some point you may decide to go forward with one of the two treatments - or even neither. You'll never know though unless you give it a chance!

Good luck. :)
 
Last edited:
Astrid

Astrid

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2010
Messages
75
Location
USA
If you don't feel totally satisfied with what you're getting out of your sessions with your psychiatrist, I don't see any reason why you shouldn't see someone else too. Personally though I have been with a psychologist and was disappointed, I just kind of felt like he didn't have the experience or knowledge base to deal with my kind of problems, I would have preferred someone with more extensive training. So actually, if you're looking for someone to discuss the more day-to-day or past issues that you feel you don't get around to with your psychiatrist, adding a psychologist might be just what you need.
 

Similar threads

Top