Psychoanalysis and Schizophrenia?

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firemonkee57

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I've just finished reading Christopher Bollas' newest book When the Sun Bursts, about his work providing psychoanalysis to people going through psychosis. I realised I feel very mixed about it, and I suspect this tells me about my ambivalence about psychoanalysis more generally.

Psychoanalysis and schizophrenia fell out with one another in the 1980s, when the idea that the latter was a brain based disorder began to usurp the notion (mainstream in the 1950s, 60s and 70s US) that it was a psychological reaction originating in family dynamics. Many things contributed to the therapeutic divorce. The overall background was the rise of biological psychiatry and the renewed interest in using the DSM as a systematic tool for empirical research, but several historical events also conspired to paint psychoanalysis in a particularly unfavourable light. One major blow was the Chestnut Lodge Follow Up Study, conducted by Thomas McGlashan, a psychiatrist with sympathies to psychoanalysis who became curious about how effective it was. He examined the long term outcomes of patients at Chestnut Lodge (pretty much the world center of psychoanalytic treatment for schizophrenia) and concluded they were not being helped by their treatment. Another was the Osheroff Case, in which a physician with severe depression was treated psychodynamically and tried to sue Chestnut Lodge for not deploying the most effective treatment.

The Osheroff case did not actually concern an individual with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, but the principle at stake (whether psychoanalysis was an effective treatment for a severe and enduring psychological difficulty) was highly relevant to that diagnosis.


Psychodiagnosticator: Psychoanalysis and Schizophrenia?
 
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The biomedical view dominates - we're walking/talking bags of meat.

i don't see any either/or - i think that there is an individual mix of biological, psychological, social & spiritual/transpersonal factors involved - with different weightings in each case - & that we need more integral views, understandings & approaches.

i don't think that anyone has more fully answered questions about the mind/self & madness. A lot remains a mystery.

i think it does make sense that treating people well does have therapeutic benefits. Even if the primary aetiology is physiological/biologic - surely there is still a psychological/emotional life & people are entitled to humane care, treatment, understanding & support? In actual fact i don't think the questions are answered as to aetiology. Impartially i think that there is just as much a case, if Not more of one to say that the primary aetiology is psychogenic.
 
LORD BURT

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I often feel too ashamed to talk - but I think it would do a world of good. Even at my hearing voices group - the actual voices is a taboo topic.
 
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ramboghettouk

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some of the old approaches like advanced relaxation i find useful sometimes, now they don't even seem to care if schitzos have peace and quiet, something the old hospitals claimed to provide
 
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The whole world is mad - the old fashioned moral's have gone out the window and have been replaced with lip service. Its understandable I guess. normals have so many obsessions - pensions, housings, promotions, social bullshit etc.
 
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Burt, I don't know why talking about voices in a group setting is wrong. Making topics taboo dosn't seem like it would help anyone. Just suffer in silence, seems to be what they are doing. If it could bring you some peace by talking about it, if the whole group agrees to it, I don't see why that would be wrong.
 
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I feel that most normal people are pre-occupied and self-absorbed in their own issues. I have never had a conversation with my brother about my mental illness, apart from me bringing it up and it ends with his silence. Its like he is on another planet. I have spoken with my dad, and I think he has a better understanding. He is from different time zone, but he is okay. When I say okay he is comparable to other people - who actually has a family that is supportive and takes their mental health issues seriously and offer comprehensive and effective support? Who are these people?

So yeah most people are pre-occupied with their own issues. Certain conversations seem taboo - what is so scary about words? I don't get it.
 
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Maybe it's them. My family is the same. My doctor told me they were scared, because schizophrenia is scary. Well, What about all of us that are experiencing it first hand. It's possible that they feel guilty about what they think about you, or how they treated you. There's a time when people will never turn around, and do the right thing. I think they become too ashamed, I could be wrong, maybe they can't feel at all. If wish they all realized that avoiding the topic, is avoiding the person.
 
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The world is a mess. Nobody does anything about it. Massive debt issues, a warped economy, poverty, anxiety, environmental, health - the list is longer than this.

Nobody comes up with the hard solutions. What makes you think they can tackle something like schizophrenia?
 
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ramboghettouk

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my sister the gp said she was scared of getting contaminated, my brother when i went through that recovery stage and we went to the pub together he told me the 2 yrs he spent on the dole he was convinced he was going mad
 
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I don't care anymore. I just want to die.
 
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Burt, Why are you saying that? What do you think should/could happen?
 
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Burt, Why are you saying that? What do you think should/could happen?
It does not really matter what I think. A lot of people on here have to prove their illnesses. What happened to the truth? If you say I am not well - is that not good enough. Its not because everything is twisted and shit.
 
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The world is a mess. Nobody does anything about it. Massive debt issues, a warped economy, poverty, anxiety, environmental, health - the list is longer than this.

Nobody comes up with the hard solutions. What makes you think they can tackle something like schizophrenia?
A lot of people find it all entertaining.

There are solutions - there are ways of addressing everything - But there's No point trying to argue for it all or raise awareness on it all - the vast majority of people are totally uninterested & will fight & attack any & all solutions to everything, with violent aggression.

We're in a kind of giant child's sand pit - that's what this World is - it's some kind of very basic training for most people.

1% of the population with apparent schizophrenia & it can't be sorted out? The Government/System could easily put in some kind of special measure for people with 'SMI'. Other thing is it's all a big fat lie imo. Mental health isn't what the majority says it all is, but again, it's pointless to try & argue all that. We all have genetically caused brain diseases that need lifelong treatment with drugs.
 
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