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Proper Procedures for quitting cigarettes

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Pollysamual

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My dad is addicted to smoking since last 20 years, earlier it didn’t had much effect but now when he is 50+ his cough level has considerably increased. He is also willing to quit smoking, but he always ended up smoking again. Can anyone help me find a proper guide or procedure to quit smoking permanently? Thanks in advance
 
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schizolanza

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If he goes to his GP he can get help in the form of nicotine patches.
 
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Apotheosis

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It really does come down to wanting; the desire & willingness to stop.
 
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Dollit

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If he wants to stop then the NHS is a good first place to go.
 
daffy

daffy

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I agree with apo. It is down to the desire to stop. I stopped 20years ago with the help of nicotine gum and bought myself a car with the money i saved. It was one of the best things i ever did.

His GP may be able to refer him to a 'quit smoking group' for help
 
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schizolanza

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I agree that he really has to want to stop.I know of a person who wanted to stop,but just didn't have the will power.He ended up chewing the gum as well as patches on his arms AND smoking 20 a day.
 
scottsblue

scottsblue

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i recomend a good stop smoking book to go with patches or a inhalater, not the £10 book by i think alan car, its far to big and was like reading a dictionary, its probably better after you`ve read a shorter one.
 
bupanishad2012

bupanishad2012

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Stopping smoking?

Smoke an occasional cigar. Works for me! Cigarette PAPER is deadly and smells awful. Pure tobacco can actually be, if not good for you, a good alternative to heavy cigarette use. Personal opinion only, of course.
 
bupanishad2012

bupanishad2012

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Quitting cigarettes

"Pure tobacco" is anything that does not contain paper, whether rolled by hand or machine. I use, for instance, regular cigars, or, more usually, the "Backwoods" brand or the "Outlaws" brand, both of which are pure rolled leaves, no paper and about the size of a cigarette, tobacco, and deliver just enough nicotine without being too heavy. Again, I am a heart patient, but not severe enough to give up smoking just yet, and it does help with my seizures. I'm not advocating tobacco, generally, but "pure" tobacco---rolled leaves---are, in my opinion preferable to tobacco combined with paper of any kind. I DO NOT chew, and I am adamantly against that---if, for no other reason, esthetic purposes. I know I am tempting fate by smoking at all, but so far, so good.
 
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Dollit

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It isn't the paper that causes the cancers that attack the mouth, tongue, throat and lungs, it's the carcinogens in the tobacco. People who chew tobacco have a higher incidence of cancer on the side of the mouth that they hold the tobacco on than non chewers. Link there I think.
 
bupanishad2012

bupanishad2012

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Quitting cigarette

It isn't the paper that causes the cancers that attack the mouth, tongue, throat and lungs, it's the carcinogens in the tobacco. People who chew tobacco have a higher incidence of cancer on the side of the mouth that they hold the tobacco on than non chewers. Link there I think.
Agree, however, if you want to talk about carcinogens, consider the many, many warnings on medicine that both TV and "black box" warnings put on them. Also, in our plastic, throw-away society, plastics have to be the greatest cause of carcinogens ever. Tobacco is something that, at least, gives its users some benfits, in my opinion. If you don't smoke now---DON'T! If you do, then mitigate its harmful effects by cutting down.
 
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Dollit

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I smoked for many years and never got any benefits at all. All I got was an expensive addiction and an inability to breathe properly. I was unable to do even the simplest exercise and I played sports a lot so I was quite fit.

Funny that the only people who have died of lung cancer in my family were the smokers. That's was one of the best benefits I got from smoking - watching my dad die of lung cancer.
 
bupanishad2012

bupanishad2012

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Quitting cigarettes

I'm so sorry! Had I known more about your experience, I would not have been so harsh. My references to "benefits" were from my own experience and from what I read on Wikipedia about nicotine generally. I am aware of the down side, however, since I had a sister-in-law who died from lung cancer, and she looked like death long before it took her. Tobacco can be, and usually is, devastating on its users. That's why I say, if you don't smoke now---don't start. If you do---and cannot quit---cut down as much as possible. My own experience is not typical, I know, even though I use it to control seizures. I have stopped "cold turkey" many times in my life for as long as 3-5 years at a time. That is one reason that I probably don't have the addiction or the devastating effects now. But, they are always a possibility. I live "on the edge" quite a bit. As my brother, who died from an overdose of the drug Ecstacy, said, "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room." LOL He was addicted to cigarettes, too. I miss him!
 
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