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Possible genetic causes of BPD identified

firemonkey

firemonkey

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Southend on sea
According to the National Institute of Mental Health, borderline personality disorder (BPD) is more common than schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and is estimated to affect 2 percent of the population. In a new study, a University of Missouri researcher and Dutch team of research collaborators found that genetic material on chromosome nine was linked to BPD features, a disorder characterized by pervasive instability in moods, interpersonal relationships, self-image and behavior, and can lead to suicidal behavior, substance abuse and failed relationships.

“The results of this study hopefully will bring researchers closer to determining the genetic causes of BPD and may have important implications for treatment programs in the future,” said Timothy Trull, professor of psychology in the MU College of Arts and Science. “Localizing and identifying the genes that influence the development of BPD will not only be important for scientific purposes, but will also have clinical implications.”

In an ongoing study of the health and lifestyles of families with twins in the Netherlands, Trull and colleagues examined 711 pairs of siblings and 561 parents to identify the location of genetic traits that influences the manifestation of BPD. The researchers conducted a genetic linkage analysis of the families and identified chromosomal regions that could contain genes that influence the development of BPD. Trull found the strongest evidence for a genetic influence on BPD features on chromosome nine.

In a previous study, Trull and research colleagues examined data from 5,496 twins in the Netherlands, Belgium and Australia to assess the extent of genetic influence on the manifestation of BPD features. The research team found that 42 percent of variation in BPD features was attributable to genetic influences and 58 percent was attributable to environmental influences, and this was consistent across the three countries. In addition, Trull and colleagues found that there was no significant difference in heritability rates between men and women, and that young adults displayed more BPD features then older adults.

“We were able to provide precise estimates of the genetic influence on BPD features, test for differences between the sexes, and determine if our estimates were consistent across three different countries,” Trull said. “Our results suggest that genetic factors play a major role in individual differences of borderline personality disorder features in Western society.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081216114100.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18830134?dopt=Abstract
 
T

Trish

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I was led to believe it was a truma of some sort that caused it ie abuse which would explain it running in familys anyway as more than likely the abuse ran in the family.
 
S

saffron

Guest
there comes the arguement nature v nurture.

if a trauma has affected your behaviour it is intitially the trauma that triggers it, however, what makes your behaviour unique is the way your chemical brain responsed and this is a predisposed reaction. wouldnt it?

in the case of abuse running in the family I think this is more to do with learnt behaviour. it is learnt through the ages. some follow on not knowing any different, some carry on but hate their behaviour but feel they have to do it to fit in, and some turn their backs on it and break the cycle.

interesting read as well.

S
 
Q

quality factor

Guest
bpd - causes?

It seems that there is still much research being undertaken into the causes of Borderline Personality Disorder.
The main areas for research are whether it is caused by a genetics or envirionment or maybe people may have a disposition to both.
BPD is believed to run in families via first relatives, but this doesn't necessarily mean that if you have bpd then your son or daughter may suffer from it. If the cause is pimarily down to environmental influences, then hopefully creating the right environment for your children may avert the disorder.
To assume that you can get BPD because you suffered from child abuse and poor parenting is thought to be misguided. One may not have suffered child abuse but may go on to develop BPD in later life.
It was also thought at one point that BPD was related to schizophrenia or other severe psychotic conditions.In the early years of BPD this train of thought was dominant, despite little empirical research. Further and on-going research does not necessarily follow this path of thought.
A site I would recommend to people recently diagnosed or who want to know more about their condition and which is 'user friendly' is
'Borderline UK'.
 
firemonkey

firemonkey

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Messages
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Location
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As far as i am aware those who were originally dxed as ' borderline' were seen as having an illness that had a schizophrenic tinge to it and was seen as being at the borderline between neurosis and psychosis.
There were i believe several different terms used as well as 'borderline personality' such as Hoch and Polatin's(?) pseudoneurotic schizophrenia, ambulatory schizophrenia ,as if personality etc.

By current classification a number of those who fitted the then description for borderline/pseudoneurotic etc i believe would be classified as 'schizotypal'.

I believe that because of the way borderline and schizotypal were defined in the dsm 3(?) there was considerable diagnostic overlap between the two ie a sizeable number of people were seen as meeting the criteria for both diagnoses.

Definitions were then revised in an attempt to better delineate(? i hope that's the right word) the two disorders.

Nowadays schizotypal is seen as a 'schizophrenia spectrum' disorder whereas with 'borderline' the debate centres around how much it does or doesn't belong to the 'bipolar spectrum'.
The likes of Hagop Akiskal have pinned their colours quite firmly to the belief that borderline personality disorder belongs within the bipolar spectrum -( a rapid cycling/atypical variant of bipolar?) and have put their case quite eloquently and persuasively.

For example.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi....x?cookieSet=1
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/457151
http://tinyurl.com/393at9

Perugi G, Akiskal HS: Are Bipolar II, Atypical Depression, and Borderline Personality overlapping manifestations of a common cyclothymic-sensitive diathesis?
 
Q

quality factor

Guest
As far as i am aware those who were originally dxed as ' borderline' were seen as having an illness that had a schizophrenic tinge to it and was seen as being at the borderline between neurosis and psychosis.
There were i believe several different terms used as well as 'borderline personality' such as Hoch and Polatin's(?) pseudoneurotic schizophrenia, ambulatory schizophrenia ,as if personality etc.

By current classification a number of those who fitted the then description for borderline/pseudoneurotic etc i believe would be classified as 'schizotypal'.

I believe that because of the way borderline and schizotypal were defined in the dsm 3(?) there was considerable diagnostic overlap between the two ie a sizeable number of people were seen as meeting the criteria for both diagnoses.

Definitions were then revised in an attempt to better delineate(? i hope that's the right word) the two disorders.

Nowadays schizotypal is seen as a 'schizophrenia spectrum' disorder whereas with 'borderline' the debate centres around how much it does or doesn't belong to the 'bipolar spectrum'.
The likes of Hagop Akiskal have pinned their colours quite firmly to the belief that borderline personality disorder belongs within the bipolar spectrum -( a rapid cycling/atypical variant of bipolar?) and have put their case quite eloquently and persuasively.

For example.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi....x?cookieSet=1
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/457151
http://tinyurl.com/393at9

Perugi G, Akiskal HS: Are Bipolar II, Atypical Depression, and Borderline Personality overlapping manifestations of a common cyclothymic-sensitive diathesis?
The latter part of your post is interesting to me re the possible link between borderline and bipolar.
I was diagnosed with bipolar 11 in 1994 and treated as the pdoc felt fit with a combi of Lithium and carbamazipine. I took this medication along with a variety of anti-psychotics etc until I was assigned a new pdoc in 2006.
In 2006 my diagnosis was reviewed and changed to one of BPD. I questioned this diagnosis and sought a second opinion.
The diagnosis from the Director of Psychiatry at my local hospital came back as Bipolar11/BPD. He felt that I should be treated with a combi talking /meds therapy with as little medication as possible to control it.
My pdoc and his CPN still dispute the presence of bipolar and it has been an on going battle to persuade them that I need a mood stabiliser. They argue that I do not display hypomania of enough conseqence to warrant a bipolar diagnosis....how can they judge this when they are not with me 24/7 and are obviously not prepared to accept what I report back to them? I believe that there is not an emphasis on hypomania at a high level with bipolar11, thus the original diagnosis.
The BPD / Bipolar suggested link would answer many questions as far as my diagnosis is concerned. I will certainly follow your links and challenge my pdoc. Thank you..
 
Last edited:
firemonkey

firemonkey

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 12, 2008
Messages
131
Location
Southend on sea
I had a dx of schizoaffective mixed type/bipolar disorder for over 20 years. Schizoaffective mixed being the more regular dx given. I was on lithium and then tegretol sometimes with an added atypical.
entit
Soon after admitting that the meds helped but didn't take away symptoms entirely i was switched to a Personality disorder NOS dx with predominant borderline traits.
This was despite being upfront about the fact i have never been that good at remembering to take meds which might have accounted for some of the failure of meds to take away symptoms.

According to Rethink

#

In Rethink's experience, a diagnosis of personality disorder is sometimes given inappropriately to people who:

# are 'non-compliant' or difficult to engage in treatment

# do not respond to most treatments

# are difficult to 'manage' in settings like a hospital ward

# are difficult to diagnose

Despite being switched to a PD dx my pdoc refused to put me on an anti depressant several years ago because of the possible adverse effect on my moods.
At the time i was on no meds as they took me off meds when they gave me the PD dx.
Instead he put me back on Zyprexa.

As being bipolar or schizoaffective mixed/bipolar is the only reason not to prescribe a stand alone AD and i was no longer regarded as bipolar i found this decision strange to say the least.

I can only put it down to the pdoc hedging his bets whilst being arrogant enough on the surface to change the DX.

I suppose it would be akin to the man who confidently proclaims to all his mates 'This horse will win for certain' but proceeds to place a side bet on one or more other horses running in the race just in case.
Psychiatrists are probably quite skilled in the noble art of covering their own backs.
 
Q

quality factor

Guest
A key word you used in your response which also applies to my pdoc is 'arrogance'.... maybe they need a degree in arrogance in order to qualify as a Consultant!!
My pdoc, as I said, even ignored his senior's dx and despite further questioning by myself continues to do so. This has resulted in quite a lot of instability for me to say the least.
The only benefit I have had from his views is that he took me off Lithium fourteen months ago and I have recently been dx with CKD and Kidney scarring as a result of fourteen years on Lithium. Mind you he was not aware of my kidney problem at the time. No doubt when I see him in two weeks he will probably announce that he has done me a great favour!!
 
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