Police threaten legal action over lack of mental health beds

cpuusage

cpuusage

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#1
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-37583441

"A chief constable has vowed to stop "unlawfully" holding people with a mental illness in police cells because the NHS has no beds for them.

Shaun Sawyer, chief constable of Devon and Cornwall Police, wrote to Devon Partnership NHS Trust to say it would be held to account in future.

The letter, leaked to the Express and Echo, says legal action may be taken if the situation is not resolved.

The trust said it was disappointed, but accepted more needed to be done.

Mr Sawyer said while it was "unedifying" to sue a public body, he would do so if necessary."
 
Kerome

Kerome

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#2
Yep, this is current in the Netherlands as well. There is a big discussion about the distribution of responsibility between first response and care in the following hours and days. They were even considering making the mental health services first responders, letting emergency services phone centres sort out who goes where - a plan that failed miserably.

All of which came about because the number of calls to police about people suffering mental health problems in public since 2010 rose by 65%. Seems that society is putting more stress on the less fortunate.
 
M

mrspoon

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#4
. Perhaps others have had a different experience,but I have found police officers better to talk too in a crisis than mental health workers...

Rare is it ,have I found a mental health worker helpful in a crisis. I don't know whether it's the training, burnout, wrong people being recruited I have no idea.

Iam also a fan of crisis houses, I was a guest in one during a very bad time. They were staffed by a mix of peer support workers who had gone from volunteering to being paid to do shifts, and other staff employed by the local council. The police handed me over to one, and it seemed a very efficient system as a kind of half way to an inpatient bed but allows more supervision than you would get at home.

The only useful thing about the crisis teams in my case,they seemed very good at chasing up psychiatrist appointments and dealing with my lackustre care by my previous mental health team. and seemed to get things moving. I was quickly taken back on after an incorrect discharge by my old mental health team and then transferred to the longer term care team due to the crisis team and my psychologist getting involved.

But in terms of actual care and support I do think crisis teams seem quite limited in what they can offer. I don't think 'home treatment' is suitable for many people in a serious crisis to be honest,.
 
I

IWILLOBTAINMENTALHEALTH

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#5
I called the suicide prevention hotline number before and the bitch on the phone told me that I was not cleared to use that number and hung up on me!!! :mad:
 
M

mrspoon

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#6
I called the suicide prevention hotline number before and the bitch on the phone told me that I was not cleared to use that number and hung up on me!!! :mad:
Personally I think the samaritans are better... and they are volunteers....a disgusting way you were treated.

I do think in part it's the way mental health workers are trained more than perhaps just not caring. My social worker, when I first met her was a bit off, I had a real crisis and she actually was quite dismissive. I was so upset that she told me it was 'my choice if I killed myself' after she asked me some very personal questions about my past.I told my psychologist whatever text book that was written in they need to re write it as I personally wouldn't say that to anyone let alone someone I had responsibility for , don't care if he told her what I said, Iam past caring now.

Though recently there has been a 'development', my psychologist seems to be very involved with my care now talking to her as I worried them seems to phone her after he see's me to give her an update .And suddenly she is acting very caring and dare I say 'sweet',it just shows you they can turn it off and on like a tap, Which is quite disconcerting in a way, that it's a bit of an act and mindgames.
 
I

IWILLOBTAINMENTALHEALTH

Guest
#7
Personally I think the samaritans are better... and they are volunteers....a disgusting way you were treated.

I do think in part it's the way mental health workers are trained more than perhaps just not caring. My social worker, when I first met her was a bit off, I had a real crisis and she actually was quite dismissive. I was so upset that she told me it was 'my choice if I killed myself' after she asked me some very personal questions about my past.I told my psychologist whatever text book that was written in they need to re write it as I personally wouldn't say that to anyone let alone someone I had responsibility for , don't care if he told her what I said, Iam past caring now.

Though recently there has been a 'development', my psychologist seems to be very involved with my care now talking to her as I worried them seems to phone her after he see's me to give her an update .And suddenly she is acting very caring and dare I say 'sweet',it just shows you they can turn it off and on like a tap, Which is quite disconcerting in a way, that it's a bit of an act and mindgames.
I found her very rude. I'm glad your situation improved. What are samaritans?