Our own thread!!!!

maxitab

maxitab

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:woohoo:

We qualify for our own thread! This is great -thanks.
First, The Facts.

BPD has a higher incidence of occurrence than schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, and is present in approximately two percent of the general population. BPD has been evidenced in all cultures. It is estimated that between 10 percent of clients in outpatient clinical settings and 15 to 20 percent of those in inpatient psychiatric settings meet the diagnostic criteria for BPD.

Thirty to 60 percent of those presenting with a personality disorder have BPD.

Of diagnosed cases of borderline personality disorder, 75 percent are female. It is possible that BPD may be missed in men, whose symptoms may be seen as antisocial or narcissistic, rather than borderline.
 
bluenomore

bluenomore

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hey, well done for getting your own forum for BPD :)

Could you maybe talk about how long it took for you to be diagnosed? I've been reading about symptoms here and here, and I think I might have quite a few symptoms myself (I haven't been given a particular diagnosis myself from my pdoc). I know it's very easy (and dangerous) to think that you qualify, so I was wondering how you came to be diagnosed?
 
maxitab

maxitab

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I lurve talking about BPD, and now consider myself a real expert.

Once I got in the system I think it took them about three minutes to diagnose me!
No.

I kept away from the MHS because of stuff I witnessed in the past that scared me. I also worked in 'the field' a bit and was not wanting to be medicated. Had BIG probls all my life....had eight years of private therapy, did the SH thing, loads of S attempts (always refused attempts to admit me to psyche ward and said I was safe).
Then 10 years ago I became catatonic following a massive OD and was admitted voluntarily, mainly because I was incapable of protesting!
I think they made the diagnosis pretty quick once I was able to speak and give a history. But they gave me very little info, and when I looked it up I rejected it out of fear. 29 weeks later and discharged I met my brill Therapist who explained BPD in depth and within 6 weeks I was in DBT.
I do have big mood swings, but not simple up and down, mine go sideways and diagonally too, and are usually rapid, and involve all of my feelings. I am extremely emotionally sensitive and though things are less intense now I don't think any of my emotional responses, happy or otherwise, are within 'normal' ranges!
I also have: Major Depression.
Agoraphobia.
Dissociative Syndrome
Severe PTSD
Severe Arthritis

I meet all the criteria for BPD, abusive childhood, high intelligence, invlidating environment, predisposition to emotional intensity...so I guess I was easy to diagnose.

Historically, and even now, BPD was a diagnosis of exclusion because no one knew how to treat it, so we were sent home and left to get on with it. There is still a fear among MH practitioners and so some avoid giving the diagnosis. In some places there is no available treatment so again, the diagnosis is avoided. These factors, combined with the mood swings, often mean we are mis-diagnosed, men more especially, though things are changing. There is a diagnostic tool, a personality inventory which can be administered by a registered clinical psychologist, which is definitive on any diagnosis, and people should ask for that assessment to be made.....
 
amathus

amathus

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Yes at last our own thread!....

I'm sure there will be lots of different experiences to discuss....

I think everyone is an expert about their problem as they are the ones who are 'experiencing 'it day to day.

As for me, I consider living with BPD to be a nightmare. I have not been offered any appropriate therapy for it, having been told that there is nobody who specialises in D.B.T.
in the area. I was dx five years ago, and to a certain extent I am still floundering.

I have had the foresight to read up about BPD extensively, but I need practical help.

Lets hope we can help each other out in this thread...I'm sure we can!

qf.
 
dib4uk

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well done all for getting our own thread. yay.

For me diganosis came really quickly after two initial assessments from the psychiartrist they found out that i have emotionally unstable personality disorder aka borderline, as well as cyclothymia which is amood disorder and more worrying and more scary multiple personalities.

Ive found that the cmht have been very good, no real complaints actuarly, and im in the line i hope to get a care cordinator who might be able to help me further.
 
amathus

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well done all for getting our own thread. yay.

For me diganosis came really quickly after two initial assessments from the psychiartrist they found out that i have emotionally unstable personality disorder aka borderline, as well as cyclothymia which is amood disorder and more worrying and more scary multiple personalities.

Ive found that the cmht have been very good, no real complaints actuarly, and im in the line i hope to get a care cordinator who might be able to help me further.

I had actually got a dx of Bipolar 11 and was working with that, then after a change of County and CMHT five years ago, a dx of BPD came right out of the blue for me.
I was very distressed, the more I read about it and discovered it came under the umbrella of a Personality Disorder the worse it got.
I must admit to struggling to accept the dx for about two and a half years. I searched out a second opinion, and then was given a dual dx of Bipolar11 / BDP.
I believe there is a fine line to be drawn between the two.

My CMHT has not offered a great deal of practical help. My CPN helps me to challenge my thoughts in situations that may have arisen
and that's about it.

I do wonder how many CMHT's up and down the country (UK) have a specialist who can deal with 'Borderliners'?
It seems Treatments which will help with Emotionally Unstable clients (BDP) may be rather patchy in certain areas
from what has previously been reported on the forum .

qf.
 
bullybeef

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Hey, well done to those of you who initiated the action to get this exclusive thread.
This saves so much time and at least those of us who use it will know they can receive empathy from fellow suffers.
I personally self diagnosed initially about 10 yrs ago. My therapist, who did soooo much good in helping me to remember my past agreed totally with my diagnosis and this helped us tremendously to work together with greater understanding.
I helped on BorderlineUK for a couple of years.
I fell out with other moderators over the way the whole setup was becoming too big and less personalised.
I look forward to (if that's possible with BPD!) to more involvement on here.
 
amathus

amathus

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To bullybeef:

Borderline UK was the site I was told to take references from by my then Consultant
when first dx five years ago!
Up until that point I had never heard of BPD.

I look forward to some quality advice from you...

qf.
 
bluenomore

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I lurve talking about BPD, and now consider myself a real expert.

Once I got in the system I think it took them about three minutes to diagnose me!
No.

I kept away from the MHS because of stuff I witnessed in the past that scared me. I also worked in 'the field' a bit and was not wanting to be medicated. Had BIG probls all my life....had eight years of private therapy, did the SH thing, loads of S attempts (always refused attempts to admit me to psyche ward and said I was safe).
Then 10 years ago I became catatonic following a massive OD and was admitted voluntarily, mainly because I was incapable of protesting!
I think they made the diagnosis pretty quick once I was able to speak and give a history. But they gave me very little info, and when I looked it up I rejected it out of fear. 29 weeks later and discharged I met my brill Therapist who explained BPD in depth and within 6 weeks I was in DBT.
I do have big mood swings, but not simple up and down, mine go sideways and diagonally too, and are usually rapid, and involve all of my feelings. I am extremely emotionally sensitive and though things are less intense now I don't think any of my emotional responses, happy or otherwise, are within 'normal' ranges!
I also have: Major Depression.
Agoraphobia.
Dissociative Syndrome
Severe PTSD
Severe Arthritis

I meet all the criteria for BPD, abusive childhood, high intelligence, invlidating environment, predisposition to emotional intensity...so I guess I was easy to diagnose.

Historically, and even now, BPD was a diagnosis of exclusion because no one knew how to treat it, so we were sent home and left to get on with it. There is still a fear among MH practitioners and so some avoid giving the diagnosis. In some places there is no available treatment so again, the diagnosis is avoided. These factors, combined with the mood swings, often mean we are mis-diagnosed, men more especially, though things are changing. There is a diagnostic tool, a personality inventory which can be administered by a registered clinical psychologist, which is definitive on any diagnosis, and people should ask for that assessment to be made.....
Wow! Great post. Thanks for explaining things. Sorry, didn't mean to hijack your forum :) Maybe I'm being neurotic, but I do have a lot of those symptoms. Not seeing my pdoc until January, but I think I will talk to him about it.

Good luck with your forum :)
 
bullybeef

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My Inner Child Helped Me.

Hi qf,

I spent time with various mental health workers over the years and none were prepared to be flexible with me. That is until I found this brilliant woman who seemed to embrace what had to say about BPD and said to me "I will read up as much as I can to bring myself upto date on BPD and take take it on board."

She said to me that she understood why I would have become BPD based on my history of adoption,sexual abuse and emotional abuse. She then spent a great deal of her time teaching me how to communicate with the inner child. To start withI thought it was a stupid embarrassing thing to do. But I trusted her and took it seriously.

I was both shocked and amazed at how much I related to this child. He had been waiting all my life for me to aknowledge him. I embraced the fear,anxiety, anger and loneliness and really stuck up a real bond with him.

This may be something you are familiar with and have tried yourself. All I know is, it was a turning point in my life and I still talk to little me. When I am feeling overwhelmed or in fear of dissapearing, he reminds me that I should be looking after him and to grow up.

This is only a fraction of what I am trying to convey but I hope it may be of interest to you or anyone else who may never have tried it.
 
maxitab

maxitab

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I am so happy to have this forum and delighted with all of the posts, yes, lets help and support each other as much as we can.

For those who don't know there are Nice Guidelines on treatment of BPD which you can wave at your CMHT/Therapist/pdoc/CC or whoever. They may be guidelines but you can get some effective responses if professionals think you might know what you are on about....and they make interesting reading....

Anyone with a BPD dx can ask for the Therapy specific to them......they must by law now offer you appropriate therapy.
 
C

cfb107

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Hey guys..

Can someone explain to me what DBT is?? (feeling a little naive now :eek:)
 
maxitab

maxitab

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Dialectic Behavioural Therapy is a form of CBT.......the difference is that it takes two threads.
One is a 'skills group' which is what it says, ways of learning how to cope with the emotional dis-regulation and feel a bit better, end the SH and S if they are happening.
At the same time you have individual therapy each week too, to deal with the stuff from the past. This is what makes it so unique.....it is both about the past and the present, what is changing, what is static. A dialectic. It really addresses the interplay between what happened to us and led to our being this way, as well as saying it does not have to be like this......
It is quite tough because you have to be prepared to do whatever it takes to give up acting on the feelings, and learn how to become less emotionally reactive overall, but it is possible. I did two years, with a break of about 9 weeks between them. I still see my DBT Therapist when I need to and we still look at how stuff form the past is intruding now and how to cope with that so I am not just acting out of old habits.

Its more complex than this, but this is the basic idea, and there is evidence that it is very helpful, in fact it was developed specifically for people with BPD.
 
C

cfb107

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That sounds brilliant... Don't think it's available around me though (I don't drive which doesn't help). Haven't heard anything about it. Will ask the pdoc at next appt :)
 
J

jently

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Thank You

Thank you guys for starting this new thread.
It's so helpful for me as a recently diagnosed and, so far, untreated BPD patient to read other's experiences.

I am waiting to start CBT, but I am somewhat confused as my keyworker at LINK, who I find absolutely amazingly sensitive and helpful, mentioned doubts as to the helpfulness of CBT for BPD.

I confess I too have wondered how this might change my emotional reactions, as there are times when I am 'up' when I think completely positively and react emotionally totally differently to when I am 'down' and then my thinking is completely negative.

In my experience the emotional reactivity affects my mental state (thought processes) and not the other way round, so how can CBT change the way I feel?

Just my two cents.
 
maxitab

maxitab

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Very insightful Jently, and by the way welcome to the forum.

My understanding is that CBT does not take into account the unconscious and it's actions....er, our unconscious actions (!) When I did a Mind over Mood group, I constantly argued with the facilitator who tried to tell me that 'feelings follow thoughts'. Yep, they often do, but also, they often don't, and we feel first, then have thoughts.... because the thought process in this case takes place unconsciously. You are both right, CBT is of limited value for anyone with BPD! Not totally useless, but its like going to A&E with a broken leg and them saying "We have no plaster to splint your leg, but we can give you physio, okay".

I would go back to the keyworker armed with the NICE guidelines on BPD, which clearly state what should be offered. If there is no DBT in your area, you can have CAT or Schema or Mentalisation Based Therapy, all have good research evidence to say they are effective with BPD. CBT does not.....


Hope this helps!
 
A

Ainsworth

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Anyone with a BPD dx can ask for the Therapy specific to them......they must by law now offer you appropriate therapy.
or in my case, i need long term therapy, got sent for (another) assessment, yes they met my needs hooray! but......(always a but) they didnt know when the next course was going to be because of funding. im now on a waiting list again, ive had no therapy in the last 6 years of being in the CMHT :unsure:
 
maxitab

maxitab

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That is intolerable! Go wave the NICE guidelines at them......make a complaint.....
 
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