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olanzapine generic

B

black and white cat

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I'm sure i read on here a while back people talking about this but i cannot find their threads. I have just been given Dr Reddy who is apparently some Inidian Dr (??????????????????????) i don't care, i want my eli lilly. Can i get zyprexa still? is it the pharmacy or the doc that have provided me with this imposter drug? And is it any good? Is it identical? The box looks like a kid made it out of cheap card.
 
razza

razza

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Tbh I didnt understand most of what u are saying probably because my brain is mush and im not familiar with these meds personally.

But I do know law. And regarding intellectual property laws Australia and the UK are the same (i studied this as part of my law degree).

I can tell you this, generic medications come out when the patent for the original brand name (OBN) drug runs out. The OBN has therefore gotten years of publicity. When the patent runs out cheaper generics can flood the market and attempt to take a share of OBNs profit pie...

But everyone has HEARD of OBN and naturally is mistrustful of these generic imposters.

But for a generic to be considered a "generic" it must be IDENTICAL in active ingredient chemical composition and must have the same mechanisms of action. They must be same same but different - generics are cheaper, usually not as nice a shape or size, and look, well cheap. But thet are the same.

Usually in Australia a dr will give a script for OBN and let the patient decide - chemists here always ask if you want the cheaper/generic brand if one is available. Not sure if it works if you have a script for a generic but want the OBN but no harm in asking.

Hope that helps a little? Xx
 
-Phoenix-

-Phoenix-

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I'm sure i read on here a while back people talking about this but i cannot find their threads.
I remember that thread! Hold on...

...

...

...

Here it is: http://www.mentalhealthforum.net/forum/showthread.php?30622-generic-olanzapine

Let me plagiarise myself. (Is that possible?) *Ahem*:

monkey business said:
Your GP will likely swear blind to you that the generic version of olanzapine is the same as Zyprexa.

The NHS Evidence website has the results of a study comparing two versions of olanzapine (an Egyptian generic against Zyprexa). It seems to be chopped at the end so here is the full version from the FDA website.

They concluded that there wasn't any significant difference between the two versions, in other words blood levels for brand and generic were *around* the same.

But what I find interesting is the mention of a "predetermined bioequivalence range" of 80-125%, which I think means as long as at least 80% but not more than 125% of the generic version reaches your bloodstream compared to the brand version, the FDA is happy with it.

So it's possible that when your GP switched you to generic, you may have lost an equivalent of 20% of your dose, which I think is very significant and possibly the reason why it's not working as well as the Zyprexa.

But since this is an FDA-related study, I'm not sure if the NHS uses the same bioequivalence range. Given that this study has appeared on the NHS Evidence website, I'm going to make a logical guess and say that it is.

Might be worth questioning your GP on this. Good luck and I hope you're feeling better soon!
The NHS study seems to have gone but the full FDA one is here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19393850

The long and short of it is switching to a different drug manufacturer could alter your blood levels and theorectically have more or less of an effect on you. But by law, the difference in bioequivalence range has to be within a certain limit (80-125%). And I guess that after a few weeks you will climatise to the new brand. Up to you though. I believe the person who started the previous thread did go back to Zyprexa after consulting their doctor, if memory serves.
 
B

black and white cat

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Thanks very much for that. I will give it a try and if it isn't any good then i will go back to the gp and have a moan.
 
Weasel

Weasel

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I've been taking Zyprexa for 15 years, but they gave me the new one and it was fine
Then I moved house and changed Gp and he's given me a newer one again, but that's ok too
 
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