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Not sure what to do

P

pdirks

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Mar 26, 2018
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My husband and I have a Granddaughter we are raising she is now 16. Her mother has schizophrenia and I'm sure other mental illness we do not know. My granddaughter has Anxiety, Depression, PCOS, ADHD and type 1 diabetes. Both of her parents were on drug. My son her father also has Anxiety, Depression. We have noticed some strange behavior from her as she has got older. She has began to lie a lot. Hearing her name called. Does not seem to be in the real word at times. Sleeps a lot, does not want to come out of room much. Likes it dark in room. And today she text me with a picture
of what she see in her dreams. (Dark scary people) She said she was hearing voices but could understand what they were saying. I have never had to take care of anyone with a mental illness. Any thoughts on this?
Thank You
 
write

write

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hello. Welcome x. Is good that your granddaughter is confiding in you. Would say helpful to keep dialogue with her about what she's telling you and offer time, space to talk or text/write, however she'd rather communicate what's happening for her. You could offer to go to GP with her or contact youngminds.org.uk perhaps? I'm not very good at the moment so apologise this is brief/no use. Hope others can share better ideas. I wish you well x
 
Kerome

Kerome

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Hi pdirks and :welcome:

What write is saying is good advice, it’s a very good thing your granddaughter is confiding in you. I would encourage her to keep drawing (it’s a form of art therapy just to work stuff out) and to discuss her drawings with you. Also to talk about what she experiences - generally doctors won’t go into it but it’s good that you keep an insight into what’s going on in your granddaughters mind. It’s usually best to restrict your reactions to being neutral, not alarmed or encouraging either.

I feel obliged to talk a little about medication, since I’ve heard before that many doctors like to prescribe antipsychotic medication for hearing voices as early as possible. It helps some people, but the side effects are significant, from weight gain to emotional flatness to the disappearance of motivation. A visit to a psychiatrist would probably result in him prescribing pills of this type.

If things get out of hand you could contact your GP for a referral to a crisis team or a Community Mental Health Team. I’d try to get access to an Early Intervention Service team, they are often better resourced than CMHT and will have a complete team on hand to look after the case.

If I think of more to say I’ll write back later. Good luck! :) ;)
 
Cazcat

Cazcat

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Hi, that sounds very scary for you all. Obviously no one on an online forum can diagnose your granddaughter. I will share some of my experiences though as I feel they could be helpful.

Having a parent with a psychotic illness (including schizophrenia) increases the risk of developing psychosis. My husband has relatives with schizophrenia and schizoaffective and he suffers with psychosis himself. Psychosis is a collection of symptoms including hallucinations (such as voices), unusual beliefs (delusions and parania) and disorganised thinking (this can also come across as disorganised speech) psychosis also includes difficulties with initiating tasks, and motivation which often start before the other symptoms and can come across similar to depression. Psychosis often develops in the teenage years.

It would definately be a good idea to take your granddaughter to see her GP. Personally I would also ask for assessment from an early intervention in psychosis team. My husband's team accept referal from family members and see children as well as adults. They will also assess people who are felt to be at high risk of developing psychosis prior to psychotic symptoms becoming evident in an attempt to prevent a first episode (Not sure how they identify these high risk people) I don't know what the services in your area are like. If your granddaughter is experiencing psychosis there is evidence that the earlier specialist intervention is available the better the long term outcome.

Of course this may not be Psychosis, but getting the right professionals involved early should help with whatever it is that is going on.
 
H

hongli

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Mar 26, 2018
Messages
170
Location
Vancouver
Hello,

I'm sorry to hear that your granddaughter is struggling with her mental health, it must be very difficult for her and also both you and your husband, so I just wanted to tell you how awesome it is that you are putting in so much effort to help her, and seeking advice from this forum, so I want to make sure you know that you are doing an amazing thing for her.

Like previously mentioned replies, it's a big step for her to confide in you, and you just have to keep listening to what she has to say. I can't imagine how scary it is to hear or see some of those things, and perhaps it may be good to just talk with her about how she feels and her visions. Make sure that she doesn't feel alone (and it doesn't seem like you will let her feel alone :) ).

You can also look into consults with mental health professionals nearby, preferably those with good accreditation and reputation, and with experience in helping youth. As mentioned by a fellow member before, medications can be very harmful so they are more so a last resort. In terms of interventions, just be there for her, and be supportive, hug her like you never hugged her before :)

Just my two cents :)
 
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