NHS psychosis treatment advice.

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Jason15

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Feb 3, 2019
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3
Location
London
#1
Hi.
I wonder if anyone else has had similar experiences of NHS treatment for psychosis?
My friends son is suffering at the moment but trying to access mental health services seems almost impossible.
He has finally been assessed (after 3 trips to A&E from which he was sent home and told he was fine) and placed under a team of people who come to the house each day to see him; but my concern is they seem extremely casual and uncaring; they ask him if he's Ok, he says 'yes', and they seem to just accept that and go away. They don't appear to be aware that people in his state have literally no awareness of their condition, and their manner towards him is very abrupt and not at all kind or sympathetic.
I find this all very odd, as they are meant to be mental health experts, yet they hardly communicate with him or his family, with either advice or encouragement.
Has anyone else experienced this lazy attitude in mental health teams?
Thanks.
 
write

write

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Aug 4, 2017
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1,319
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stuck
#2
Hello,welcome. I haven't been seen by them for specific psychotic symptoms but it sadly sounds like familiar treatment from the home treatment or crisis team. Sometimes there are compassionate caring staff who have helped me but yes I have had some horrible experiences of "care" from these teams. The inconsistency of not knowing who will come, or when, or whether you will be able to get anything out of the often very brief visits, is very stressful. They often seem to just check that you're still alive, monitor meds and go again. Usually their input is only short term, a few weeks at most. Hope your friend's son will have some more consistent and compassionate input from his mental health team/psychiatrist if he has their support.
 
NWiddi

NWiddi

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May 6, 2017
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Sheffiield
#3
I'm under the Early Intervention Team for Rotherham, Doncaster and South Humber (RDaSh) and have found them to be great.

My care coordinator is always asking how I am and I tell him the truth every time, he gets the doctor out to me whenever I feel like a change of medication, he invites me to all the groups that they facilitate (walking group on Tuesdays, social group on Thursdays and pool/snooker on Fridays) and currently is putting me in contact with their vocational team to see about getting me into college this year to study psychology.
They have me in for health check-ups at the clinic for blood tests, ECG's, blood pressure and weighing at regular intervals.
They come out whenever I have a benefit form to fill in and help me out with it and they even sorted me out a travel pass to give me free bus and train travel during the off-peak.

All in all I find the staff to be genuinely caring people that would bend over backwards to make sure I'm cared for and have all my needs met.

I'm sorry your friend and his son haven't had the same experience, I guess it really is a postcode lottery for how good your services are.
 
C

Coast2

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Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Messages
1,235
Location
UK
#4
Hi,

My carecordinator, Pdoc and the GP who saw me through my period of psychosis were all fantastic. The GP whose care I was under at the time didn’t understand particularly but was supportive and kind. I trusted him.

Without a doubt, the person who made the most difference to me was my care coordinator. She was full of positivity, optimism and good practical advice. I implemented everything she suggested and, after a while, trusted her completely. It took time for me to trust her but I did. She was reliable and always turned up when she said she would, if she couldn’t because there was a more pressing priority, she would phone and let me know. I told her pretty much everything - we used to have a laugh about it all.

My Pdoc was great also. I knew pretty much immediately that she understand completely what I had gone through. I trusted her judgment and did what she told me.

I missed my care coordinator for a while. She had this ability to genuinely care but also retain a professional distance. This was particularly important during my period of post psychotic depression where I started to show signs of suicidal ideation.

The difficulty with psychotic illnesses is that people don’t hear about recovery stories. There is too much shame and silence. Because of this, misrepresentations and imbalanced views of the illness tend to dominate, which in turn perpetuate stereotypes and stigma.

I think this is a real shame because the NHS do a wonderful job of putting people back together again sometimes but these stories are never heard.

A sensationalist style of general news reporting doesn’t help either. But it’s good click-bait and generates ad revenue.

My story is not unique. Others have recovered too.
 
C

Coast2

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Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Messages
1,235
Location
UK
#5
Hi,

My carecordinator, Pdoc and the GP who saw me through my period of psychosis were all fantastic. The GP whose care I was under at the time didn’t understand particularly but was supportive and kind. I trusted him.

Without a doubt, the person who made the most difference to me was my care coordinator. She was full of positivity, optimism and good practical advice. I implemented everything she suggested and, after a while, trusted her completely. It took time for me to trust her but I did. She was reliable and always turned up when she said she would, if she couldn’t because there was a more pressing priority, she would phone and let me know. I told her pretty much everything - we used to have a laugh about it all.

My Pdoc was great also. I knew pretty much immediately that she understand completely what I had gone through. I trusted her judgment and did what she told me.

I missed my care coordinator for a while. She had this ability to genuinely care but also retain a professional distance. This was particularly important during my period of post psychotic depression where I started to show signs of suicidal ideation.

The difficulty with psychotic illnesses is that people don’t hear about recovery stories. There is too much shame and silence. Because of this, misrepresentations and imbalanced views of the illness tend to dominate, which in turn perpetuate stereotypes and stigma.

I think this is a real shame because the NHS do a wonderful job of putting people back together again sometimes but these stories are never heard.

A sensationalist style of general news reporting doesn’t help either. But it’s good click-bait and generates ad revenue.

My story is not unique. Others have recovered too.
 
J

Jason15

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Joined
Feb 3, 2019
Messages
3
Location
London
#6
Thanks for your replies. It's nice to know some services are good.
 
J

Jules5

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Jan 27, 2019
Messages
416
Location
Florida
#7
I have had bad experiences with mental Health Professionals.They seem to just sit there and wait for their Paycheck. Also, I would say that the good ones have some psychosis of there own so they really know the importance of good services.
I have a Masters in Advanced Clinical Social Work and I have been through many jobs just due to the fact my peers and bosses placed more importance on the paycheck than the client. Without the clients their would be no pay check!!!!
 
R

ramboghettouk

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Jan 7, 2008
Messages
14,189
Location
london
#8
had nothing but bad experiences, maybe didn't help that when i came out of hospital i got caught in all the long term patients leaving for care in the community, i've got all sorts of theories of why, i wouldn't be where i am today if i'd looked on the bright side

the only cpn i ever had i moved into this estate, she insisted in speaking to the caretaker, heard he'd told neighbours that someone with minor mental health problems was moving into my flat

then she sugggested i ask the kids to clear off developed into harrassment

the relationship totally broke down
 
R

ramboghettouk

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Messages
14,189
Location
london
#10
they all do anyway theres no care in the caring proffessions theres just covering arses in case of a serious case review