Newlyweds having issues thanks to snoring?

G

Glen1

Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2014
Messages
5
#1
I am new to the forum but I was hoping someone could help us out .After getting married a few months ago my wife and me never lived together before getting married (traditionalist upbringing). We have spent time in the same room together (trips etc.) but never anything long term.

Apparently, I am a heavy snorer and my wife is a light sleeper. This is something that my wife thought that she would get over in time, but apparently this is not true. She has been sleeping in the bed while I have been sleeping downstairs on the sofa.

Because we only have a one bedroom, this is something that we cannot resolve right away with separate beds. I was wondering if there is anything that you could recommend that might have worked for you? We are sleeping separately and it is not great for the marriage (yeah, imagine that). I am to the point where I am worried that I might never get this issue resolved.

Does anyone have experience with http://www.snore.net/ ?
 
Jaminacaranda

Jaminacaranda

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 18, 2013
Messages
2,192
Location
East of England
#2
My advice would be to consult a doctor about your snoring. There are many devices sold to prevent snoring - as listed on the website you link to - and some might indeed be helpful but you could waste a lot of money and time trying to find one that works for you. What might help one person would not necessarily help you. There are some conditions which cause snoring such as sleep apnoea which can be quite serious and which only a trained specialist would be able to help you with. My brother has sleep apnoea and he attended a sleep clinic (here in the UK) to get a diagnosis and now wears a mask in bed which increases his oxygen uptake.

I expect you already know some of the more common causes of snoring such as obesity, drinking alcohol and smoking but I think you would need to discuss your problem with someone who could actually discover the cause of your problem before you can address it. For example, I had a deviated septum which caused me to snore and this was cured after I had a minor operation.

I have been a snorer and also lived with a snorer so you have my sympathy - it's a difficult problem. People are less likely to snore if they sleep on their sides rather than their backs. When I slept with a snorer I had to prod him to get him to turn and sleep on his side! I have heard people suggest putting a 'barrier' in the bed so that the snorer is forced to sleep on their side but personally I didn't find this worked when I tried it with pillows and cushions. I did find that it benefitted me to try and get to sleep before my snoring partner did because his snoring was less likely to wake me up once I was in deep sleep myself.

Sorry I can't be more help!
 
SomersetScorpio

SomersetScorpio

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Joined
Aug 17, 2012
Messages
13,501
Location
The West Country
#3
You can buy things that are supposed to stop snoring and increase air flow, like nose strips or nose cones.
It's not guaranteed to solve the problem, but it might be worth a try.
Also, could she try earplugs? x
 
W

white-witch

Well-known member
Joined
May 24, 2009
Messages
1,144
Location
Dark side of the moon
#4
It was the other way round for my son it was his partner that was the heavy snorer and he is a light sleeper. So he use to sleep on the sofa. His partner went to the GP and he referred her to the hospital and it was found she had sleep apnoea and also a problem with her tonsils. She had her tonsils taken out and during the operation they also did another procedure to her throat to stop her sleep apnoea and snoring. It worked and all is good now.So I would advise you go to your GP to see if there is anything that may need a medical procedure. If not I am sure the GP can offer some other methods to try and stop the heavy snoring.