My mother is suspicious of my diagnosis

O

obierice

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Joined
Sep 16, 2017
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I was diagnosed BP1 about 3 years ago. The diagnosis was upsetting for my mother, who was in denial at first. She said something odd about me just having certain symptoms, but that I did not necessarily have a disorder, and that the diagnosis was just based on the psych's perception.

Her tune changed a year or so later, when we were chatting casually at home and she brought up therapy. She started making accusations and questioning my diagnosis, claiming that I was inflexible, I have low tolerance for stress, and that I get overwhelmed by people. She said that the only reason why I am able to keep my job is because I can work from home and don't need to socialize with my office mates.

She started asking me what exactly the psychiatrist told me about by mental health. So I just repeated what I was told - BP1, more prone to depression than mania, with poor coping mechanisms like avoidance and denial.

I think I know what she was getting at - she was pretty much firing off symptoms of BPD and trying to get me to say that I had something like it. Except that BP1 is the only the diagnosis I have ever been given, and I believe that the psych assessment (a combination of MMPI, Rorschach, IQ test, memory test, etc.) was valid.

I get why she would insinuate it, people mistake BP for BPD all the time. But what I don't get is how she swung from insisting that I had no disorder, to insinuating that I something other than BP1. She was away for a year after my DX, I moved out during that time frame, and I closed off communication, as I tend to shut down during depressive episodes, just keeping my head down and doing the bare minimum of work to get by. I have no energy for human relationships during these periods.

Would the psych have any reason to deliberately give me an inaccurate dx? I specifically asked the psych if they found any symptoms related to a PD, attention disorder, or schizophrenia (for a while I thought I might be schizoaffective) but they said no.

It's frustrating because I don't own a copy of my report and have never been allowed to see it myself - the psych just read it out to me from behind a desk.
 
TroubleinParadise

TroubleinParadise

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Jun 28, 2018
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176
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South Africa
The age old defense - fighting for or against your mental health; I get this. I've felt the need to do this. Is it worth it?

Why do we have to prove that we're unwell? I think that it's sufficient that we simply know ourselves; we don't need the validation. To this day I don't have many people I can discuss this with - most people will pass it off as nonsense; they have no internal reference system for these sort of things.

Keep strong man.
 
G

Girl interupted

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Nov 17, 2018
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She probably did some reading on bpd and found that its roots are very often tied to childhood abuse and neglect.

From what you describe, she sounds NPD, which often creates bpd children. This was my mother. I found doing some reading on NPD helped me to realize she was ill, too.
 

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