My Doctor

DoctorInternet2

DoctorInternet2

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London
#1
I have recently started taking some Abilify medication, and I got on very badly with it. Last Friday I had a call from my GPs surgery to say the psychiatrist wanted me to have a blood test, and when I asked why she said it was to see if there was anything that could be attributed to my low moods. I was pretty annoyed about it actually, and I said to the receptionist that I didn't want blood taken from me for no reason and they told me to phone the mental health services. I also asked them what is it about my blood could be attributed to my low moods :yuck:
I phoned the mental health services yesterday and they said that the reason the doctor wants the blood test is to see if Abilfy is having a negative effect on me.
I just can't get over it, for example, if the doctor felt that it might cause problems why did they give it to me in the first place :boo:
I've now decided to come off the medication, especially after that, because the side effects were too severe for me, and I was worried about endangering my long term health. I'm still getting over it, but my legs and fingers still feel a bit stiff :BLAH:
 
Cazcat

Cazcat

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#2
Unfortunately a lot of psychiatric medications have unpleasant side effects and for a lot it is recommended that you have regular physical monitoring such as blood tests and ECGs, my husband's team now do these for all their patients routinely. It is a case of balancing out the risks against the benefits so it would be worth asking you psychiatrist to explain these in more details so that you can make a fully informed choice.

Also there are some physical health problems that can cause low mood such as low vitamin D levels and thyroid problems which can be picked up on blood tests.
 
Per Ardua Ad Astra

Per Ardua Ad Astra

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#3
I was prescribed this at one time. I don't trust doctors, now. It's money for life and for old rope, and keep your fucking head down when things go wrong, and avoid taking the shit, even if it means a young child of 11 is effectively fucked up for life :mad:

I hate doctors, now. The Police too. And mental health and social workers. I wish I had NEVER had anything to do with any of them. I wish they did not exist
 
DoctorInternet2

DoctorInternet2

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#4
I was prescribed this at one time. I don't trust doctors, now. It's money for life and for old rope, and keep your fucking head down when things go wrong, and avoid taking the shit, even if it means a young child of 11 is effectively fucked up for life :mad:

I hate doctors, now. The Police too. And mental health and social workers. I wish I had NEVER had anything to do with any of them. I wish they did not exist
I know just what you mean, the doctors always seem to know what to give you that will make you feel your worse. I don't trust many English doctors now, I think the NHS has become a very third rate service. I would feel much happier if I was sent abroad for treatment. I also think it's worth paying for treatment abroad sometimes because it's often affordable, and they don't have the NHS bureaucracy to think about.
For example, in the Philippines it cost £10 for a consultation, and about £20 to see a specialist.
 
DoctorInternet2

DoctorInternet2

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Messages
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#5
Unfortunately a lot of psychiatric medications have unpleasant side effects and for a lot it is recommended that you have regular physical monitoring such as blood tests and ECGs, my husband's team now do these for all their patients routinely. It is a case of balancing out the risks against the benefits so it would be worth asking you psychiatrist to explain these in more details so that you can make a fully informed choice.

Also there are some physical health problems that can cause low mood such as low vitamin D levels and thyroid problems which can be picked up on blood tests.
Yes I understand what you say, but in my case, when the doctor knows I can handle life without them, even though I have problems, why is she prescribing something to me that she knows carries a high risk? To me that doesn't make sense.
To go to the extreme of wanting to take blood tests when I can cope without them, I don't think I'm happy with it.
If I absolutely had to take these drugs my attitude would be different I think.
 
N

nightmare57

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Mar 12, 2016
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#6
I understand. About 6 years ago I was a very healthy weight until they put me on Olanzapine. As i was getting bigger and bigger I told my doctor my mother and older sister suffer from severe weight problems. He decided to take me off it when I reach 20 stone. Every doctor knows that Olanzapine causes severe weight gain so why didn't they start the better medication I'm on now first?
 
DoctorInternet2

DoctorInternet2

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#8
I understand. About 6 years ago I was a very healthy weight until they put me on Olanzapine. As i was getting bigger and bigger I told my doctor my mother and older sister suffer from severe weight problems. He decided to take me off it when I reach 20 stone. Every doctor knows that Olanzapine causes severe weight gain so why didn't they start the better medication I'm on now first?
Hello, yes I know what you mean, and recently I was put on Aripiprazole, and I noticed that one of the side effects is that it causes headaches, and the doctor knew I got bad headaches anyway, so why did they choose that? In your case they know Olanzapine is the worse drug for weight gain.
I tried that one once, I was putting on weight with it too. :unsure:
 

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