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munchien sickness

scottsblue

scottsblue

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right its called somthing munchien/munchousen (sounds like a german word and its a sickness carried on by mothers.
the mother makes ther kid ill to get sympathy from her piers and friends and its called munchousen, i dont know how to spell it.
is ther such thing tho?

they said a lady had it in a japanese subtitled horror, so i dunno if its true or just been made up.
 
scottsblue

scottsblue

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munchousen they said, it was a german word.
:eek::scared::eek::scared::eek::scared::eek::scared:
 
L

Living Dead Girl

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munchausen is a psychiatric disorder where people fake or exagerate illness for attention.
munchausen by proxy is where the person inflicts it upon someone else to gain attention etc. usually this will be inflicted on a child or a vulnerable adult.

also i have read a book called sickend, the author talks about her experiences as a child where it turned out her mother was poisoning her so it looked like she had heart problems. her mother had munchausens by proxy.
 
E

eaglefly

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eaglefly

Munchausen Syndrome
Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy
Munchausen syndrome is a type of factitious disorder, or mental illness, in which a person repeatedly acts as if he or she has a physical or mental disorder when, in truth, they have caused the symptoms. People with factitious disorders act this way because of an inner need to be seen as ill or injured, not to achieve a concrete benefit, such as financial gain. They are even willing to undergo painful or risky tests and operations in order to get the sympathy and special attention given to people who are truly ill. Munchausen syndrome is a mental illness associated with severe emotional difficulties.

Munchausen syndrome -- named for Baron von Munchausen, an 18th century German officer who was known for embellishing the stories of his life and experiences -- is the most severe type of factitious disorder. Most symptoms in people with Munchausen syndrome are related to physical illness -- symptoms such as chest pain, stomach problems, or fever -- rather than those of a mental disorder.

Note: Although Munchausen syndrome most properly refers to a factitious disorder with primarily physical symptoms, the term is sometimes used to refer to factitious disorders in general. In this article, Munchausen syndrome refers to factitious disorder with physical symptoms.

What are the symptoms of Munchausen syndrome?
People with this syndrome deliberately produce or exaggerate symptoms in several ways. They might lie about or fake symptoms, hurt themselves to bring on symptoms, or alter diagnostic tests (such as contaminating a urine sample). Possible warning signs of Munchausen syndrome include the following:

Dramatic but inconsistent medical history
Unclear symptoms that are not controllable and that become more severe or change once treatment has begun
Predictable relapses following improvement in the condition
Extensive knowledge of hospitals and/or medical terminology, as well the textbook descriptions of illnesses
Presence of multiple surgical scars
Appearance of new or additional symptoms following negative test results
Presence of symptoms only when the patient is alone or not being observed
Willingness or eagerness to have medical tests, operations, or other procedures
History of seeking treatment at numerous hospitals, clinics, and doctors offices, possibly even in different cities
Reluctance by the patient to allow health care professionals to meet with or talk to family, friends, or prior health care providers
Problems with identity and self-esteem
What causes Munchausen syndrome?
The exact cause of Munchausen syndrome is not known, but researchers believe both biological and psychological factors play a role in the development of this syndrome. Some theories suggest that a history of abuse or neglect as a child, or a history of frequent illnesses requiring hospitalization might be factors associated with the development of this syndrome. Researchers also are studying the possible link with personality disorders, which are common in individuals with Munchausen syndrome.

How common is Munchausen syndrome?
There are no reliable statistics regarding the number of people in the United States who suffer from Munchausen syndrome, but it is considered to be rare. Obtaining accurate statistics is difficult because of dishonesty in representation. In addition, people with Munchausen syndrome tend to seek treatment at many different health care facilities, which causes misleading statistics.

While Munchausen syndrome can occur in children, it most often affects young adults.

How is Munchausen syndrome diagnosed?
Diagnosing Munchausen syndrome is very difficult because of the dishonesty that is involved. Doctors must rule out any possible physical and mental illnesses, and often use a variety of diagnostic tests and procedures before considering a diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome.
, and the outlook for recovery poor.
People with this syndrome deliberately produce or exaggerate symptoms in several ways. They might lie about or fake symptoms, hurt themselves to bring on symptoms, or alter diagnostic tests (such as contaminating a urine sample). Possible warning signs of Munchausen syndrome include the following:

Dramatic but inconsistent medical history
Unclear symptoms that are not controllable and that become more severe or change once treatment has begun
Predictable relapses following improvement in the condition
Extensive knowledge of hospitals and/or medical terminology, as well the textbook descriptions of illnesses
Presence of multiple surgical scars
Appearance of new or additional symptoms following negative test results
Presence of symptoms only when the patient is alone or not being observed
Willingness or eagerness to have medical tests, operations, or other procedures
History of seeking treatment at numerous hospitals, clinics, and doctors offices, possibly even in different cities
Reluctance by the patient to allow health care professionals to meet with or talk to family, friends, or prior health care providers
Problems with identity and self-esteem
What causes Munchausen syndrome?
The exact cause of Munchausen syndrome is not known, but researchers believe both biological and psychological factors play a role in the development of this syndrome. Some theories suggest that a history of abuse or neglect as a child, or a history of frequent illnesses requiring hospitalization might be factors associated with the development of this syndrome. Researchers also are studying the possible link with personality disorders, which are common in individuals with Munchausen syndrome.

How common is Munchausen syndrome?
There are no reliable statistics regarding the number of people in the United States who suffer from Munchausen syndrome, but it is considered to be rare. Obtaining accurate statistics is difficult because of dishonesty in representation. In addition, people with Munchausen syndrome tend to seek treatment at many different health care facilities, which causes misleading statistics.

While Munchausen syndrome can occur in children, it most often affects young adults.
 
scottsblue

scottsblue

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so its true.
:eek::scared::eek::scared::eek::scared:
 
scottsblue

scottsblue

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british goverment got it. south england got to be werst place in europe to live.
 
Eleison

Eleison

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Two good books to read that include it -

Sickened - by Julie Gregory [biography]
Keeping Faith by Jodi Picoult.

:rolleyes:
 
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