More Resources for 'Schizophrenia' Recovery.

oneday

oneday

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#43
Doing some research at work. I nicked this from Rufus May's website - hope he wouldn't mind...

"Hearing Voices, Recovery and Alternative Approaches

Below are books, self help guides and papers that I have found helpful in supporting people to deal with emotional distress and confusing mind states and recover a valued life...

Hearing Voices

Accepting Voices (1993) by Marius Romme and Sandra Escher, published by Mind. This is a pioneering book about different ways to understand and deal with voice hearing

Recovery An Alien Concept (2006) by Ron Coleman published by P&P press.
Personal story of hearing voices and recovery. Inspiring stuff!

Talking with Voices by Dirk Coerstens, Rufus May and Eleanor Longden: Guide to using the voice dialogue technique shown in the film 'The doctor who hears voices'.

'Coping With Voices and Visions' available from The Hearing Voices Network
written by people who have these experiences outlining different ways to cope with voices. £5.00.

Making Sense of Voices Marius Romme and Sandra Escher (2000) Mind Publications
Comprehensive Text book for professionals and voice hearers.

The Maastrict Interview a helpful questionnaire that helps to make sense of voice hearing and complements the book Making Sense of Voices [above].

'Hearing Voices: Working out a positive approach' by Sharon File, Mind Publications.

The Intervoice website gives good information about hearing voices research and self help initiatives.

The Voice Inside: a practical guide to coping with voices by Paul Baker. Good self help guide

Recovering From Voices by Changing Your Relationship With Them by Prof Marius Romme. This paper is based on his anthology he is puttting together with Jacqui Dillon of 50 recovery stories.

Alternative and Recovery focused approaches to mental health

There is a good downloadable report by the British Psychological Society (2000) called Recent Advances in Understanding Mental Illness and Psychotic Experiences. This details psychological research in an accessible manner.

Alternatives Beyond Psychiatry (2007). Edited by Peter Lehmann published by Peter Lehmann publishing. Reflects current approaches to self-help and non-psychiatric alternatives in cases of acute emotional problems.

Postpsychiatry: mental health in a postmodern world by Drs Phil Thomas and Pat Bracken. Both Phil and Pat are former colleagues of mine in Bradford, they were the first psychiatrists I met willing to think outside the box and put it into practice. This text book outlines their vision.

Evolving Minds is an informative film on dvd [and available on Youtube - at least it was last time I looked (Oneday)] that looks at helpful tips for people looking for different ways to deal with psychosis (hearing voices and altered states of mind). It covers diverse topics such as shamanism, nutrition, psychotherapy and meditation.

THRIVE Self help work book - for getting through crises and on to 'vivacity and emancipation'.

Recovery and the Conspiracy of Hope. Inspiring talk given by American Pat Deegan who, like me was given a diagnosis of 'schizophrenia' and on her recovery journey trained as a clinical psychologist (she did this 10 years before me though). Coincidentally, when I gave my first ever talk about my recovery journey and work Pat was siitting in the audience.

Emotional Health by Bob Johnson: Looks at ways to recover emotional health see also his organisation The James Naylor Foundation and other book Unsafe at Any Dose.

Non Violent Communication by Marshall B. Rosenberg. This book outlines a very useful approach to expressing our feeling and needs non-violently. Good for conflict resolution.

Embracing Our Selves: The Voice Dialogue Manual Fascinating psychological approach that suggests we all have many sub-personalities and we need to learn to know them and dialogue with them - good philosophy for approaching the hearing voices experience too.

Embracing Your Inner Critic: turning self criticism into a creative assett. By Hal Stone & Sidra Stone. Excellent approach to dealing with critical thoughts also very helpful for dealing with critical voices.

Madness Explained by Richard Bentall, and Schizophrenia: a scientitific delusion? by Mary Boyle, are good well researched books that highlight the problems with the schizophrenia concept and outline research findings in a more balanced way than traditional text books.

Mindfulness Literature

Mindfulness is originally an Eastern practice to help us be more in the present and less ruled by our thoughts.

I recommend all books by peace activist and Zen teacher Thich Nhat Hanh. 2 books I have found very helpful for myself and others are Anger: Buddhist wisdom for cooling the flames and Peace is every step. What I like about Thich Nhat Hanh is how he wants to promote peace in the wider world as well as in the individual.

Books by Jon Kabat Zinn are also helpful introductions to mindfulness practices and he has also done supportive research.

Leave Your Mind Behind: The everyday practice of finding stillness amidst rushing thoughts. By Matthew McKay and Catharine Sutker. Good accesible and practical guide to using mindfulness techniques and attitudes in order to gain greater peace of mind."
 
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ramboghettouk

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#44
The definition of recovery that i'm interested in is the definition used by dwp clarks, it'll be interesting how many meet that definition and what they make of it
 
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maudikie

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#47
How do you define recovery? Is it back to how the peron thought before, or has it left a scar? Are they recovered if they stop taking their medication and then fall back to another crisis? Are they recovered if their mental state is satisfactoroy but if they were treated in the older days there remains some of the side efects of the older treatment? Are they recovered if they can work for short spells but need lots of rest because they show signes of muddled thinking? How does reovery fit in with the discovery that part of the brain is O.K. with words but hopeless with numbers? Are they recovered if they need help and/or reminders for day to day actions which others take for granted? More definition for recovery please.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#49
Psychiatrist asked what a normal life means to me, i said it doesn't mean living in social housing on benefits but i guess the torys have views about living in social housing on benefits as well
 
oneday

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#50
I came across this in my documents - probably posted it sometime before. Sorry it's just notey...

Thinking about recovery
(off the top of my head – some ideas…)

The 'Recovery' concept – once part of a radical agenda of psychiatric survivors for positive change in the mental health system – has, over the past 10 years or so, been co-opted by the mental health system and made safe and unchallenging.

Survivors saying interesting things about recovery:

Ron Coleman (UK) http://www.roncolemanvoices.co.uk

Pat Deegan (US) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVlhf...eature=related

Rufus May (UK) http://rufusmay.com/index.php?option...d=30&Itemid=33

Mary Ellen Copeland (US)
Rachel Perkins (UK)

"The term 'recovery' in the UK has been rendered almost meaningless. As most health and social care services in England are now following a recovery agenda, Recovery is becoming equated with loss of services, loss of benefits, and a push towards returning to work, without the support, retraining and flexibility this would require. A recent report (Perkins et al 2009) recognises that not everyone can regain the confidence to work, and states they should not be penalised for the failings of a mental health system they have no control over."

Read the full statement from Jan Wallcraft here:

http://www.recoveryin-sight.com/wp-...onciliation-in-psychiatry-august-10-draft.pdf

Systems of recovery:

WRAP (Wellness Recovery Action Plan) - Mary Ellen Copeland (US)
THRIVE
Mike Smith (UK)
Tidal Model – Dr Phil Barker & Polly Boucanon Barker (UK)
12 steps programmes e.g. Emotions Anonymous (mostly US)

Professionals saying interesting things about recovery:

Ron Unger (US) http://recoveryfromschizophrenia.org...full-recovery/
- Reclaiming the idea of full recovery

Mike Slade (UK)
Richard Warner (US)

Some key reading:

Books
‘Recovery – An Alien Concept?’ (etc etc) – Ron Coleman
‘Recovery from Schizophrenia’ – Richard Warner
‘Social Inclusion and Recovery’ – Julie Repper & Rachel Perkins

Reports
‘100 Ways to Support Recovery’ – Rethink www.mentalhealthshop.org/document.rm?id=8914

Online
“Understanding Psychotic Experience and Working Towards Recovery” – Rufus May http://rufusmay.com/index.php?option...d=30&Itemid=33

Ronald Bassman - psychologist
http://ronaldbassman.com/
http://www.ect.org/selfhelp/psychtoday.html

"My best friends were once locked up in mental hospitals and fought their way back. We are psychiatric survivors. Some believe that psychiatric survivors defy the odds. Or maybe we were never really mentally ill, just misdiagnosed. After all, they say schizophrenia is a lifelong disease. Such reasoning makes my peers and me look like exceptions. Among our large group of closeted ex-patients are lawyers, teachers, mechanics, doctors, carpenters, plumbers and psychologists. We are your neighbours, ministers and friends, living and working in your communities. Many thousands choose not to reveal their past."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoTd8zaC_Ms

Pat Deegan - psychologist
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVlhf...eature=related

Daniel Fisher - psychiatrist
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/496394

Cathy Penney - ex psychiatric nurse
http://www.madnessradio.net/madness-...y-cathy-penney

Joanne Greenberg - author
(Her book ‘I Never Promised You a Rose Garden’ is a fictional account of her battle with ‘schizophrenia’.) http://www.mountaintopauthor.com/pages/about.html

Ron Coleman
http://www.roncolemanvoices.co.uk/

Rufus May
http://rufusmay.com/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1
 
oneday

oneday

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#52
How do you define recovery? Is it back to how the peron thought before, or has it left a scar?
I think that depends on the person and the circumstances, but recovery from any difficult event or circumstances may leave us with ‘a scar’ in some ways, but may also make us stronger in others.

I have written this elsewhere before:

“One of my problems with the notion of “recovery”, apart from its medical slant, is that “recovery” suggests to me “going back to where you were”, covering things over perhaps, which is what medication often does, I think. Whereas I would see (what gets called) psychosis as an opportunity for growth, for new insights, new understandings.

I’ve been reading and re-reading a booklet called ‘Psychosis – Mental Illness or Psychological Crisis?’ which I got from Mind publications. Anton Boisen, an American psychologist, is quoted in it. I’ll paraphrase a bit: he says that many of the more serious psychoses are essentially problem-solving experiences, that they are nature’s dramatic attempts to free a person from attitudes, beliefs or situations that are blocking their development.

As he says, “To the individual the effect is overwhelming… it shatters the foundation of your mental structure. It sweeps you away from your moorings out in to uncharted seas… you are no longer concerned with the merely individual, but about the cosmic and the universal”, you commonly think of yourself as the central character in the cosmic drama. As he says, such experiences are as old as the Human Race itself, and, (importantly) “their effects are by no means always destructive – they are essentially attempts at reorganisation in which the entire personality is aroused and its forces marshalled to meet some serious obstacle to growth.” ”

HowAre they recovered if they stop taking their medication and then fall back to another crisis?
If you fall back into another crisis, then I guess you couldn’t be called ‘recovered’ while you’re in crisis.

HowAre they recovered if their mental state is satisfactoroy but if they were treated in the older days there remains some of the side efects of the older treatment?
I don’t know what you mean.

HowAre they recovered if they can work for short spells but need lots of rest because they show signes of muddled thinking?
Depends on your definition of recovery and what you’re talking about ‘recovering’ from. If you’re talking about recovery from muddled thinking, or recovery from needing lots of rest, then I guess not.

How does reovery fit in with the discovery that part of the brain is O.K. with words but hopeless with numbers?
I don’t know about this ‘discovery’ – whose brain/s, in relation to what?

Are they recovered if they need help and/or reminders for day to day actions which others take for granted?
Who is ‘they’? Again it depends on what you're talking about being 'recovered' from - if recovered from needing help and/or reminders for day to day actions which others take for granted, then I guess not.

HowMore definition for recovery please.
Read all the people cited in my post above. I’m not a fan of the term ‘recovery’ myself, but it's better than the fiction of so-called “schizophrenia” as long-term “illness” in all cases.

I have written this elsewhere before:

“I’ve got some real doubts about the meaningfulness of the term “psychosis” and even about the notion of “recovery”!

What I mean, is that for me, part and parcel of my own journeys through and out of the extremes of mental and emotional turmoil that psychiatry labels “psychosis” has been a rejection of the medical way of responding to these experiences.

I’ve never found the usual medical way of talking about, thinking about, and responding to, the kind of experiences I’ve been through at all useful: the medical paraphernalia of diagnosis, drugs, the medicalising language generally, the language of “illness”, “mental illness”, “treatment”, and so on, even, dare I say it, the notion of “mental health”.

I suppose that it boils down to the fact that back when I found myself in a psychiatric ward, I rejected the idea of taking psychiatric drugs to subdue my experiences, and somehow – somehow – I was allowed to do this. So I went through what I went through without drugs. Also, no one tried to tell me I was “mentally ill”, or had a “psychotic illness”; that I had “bipolar disorder” or “schizophrenia” or “schizoaffective disorder”, a “borderline personality disorder” or whatever…. That I had some kind of life-long “illness”,that I’d have to be drugged for the rest of my days. And for that I’m eternally grateful. ”
 
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Apotheosis

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#53
I suppose that it boils down to the fact that back when I found myself in a psychiatric ward, I rejected the idea of taking psychiatric drugs to subdue my experiences, and somehow – somehow – I was allowed to do this. So I went through what I went through without drugs. Also, no one tried to tell me I was “mentally ill”, or had a “psychotic illness”; that I had “bipolar disorder” or “schizophrenia” or “schizoaffective disorder”, a “borderline personality disorder” or whatever…. That I had some kind of life-long “illness”,that I’d have to be drugged for the rest of my days. And for that I’m eternally grateful. ”
I rejected the idea of taking psychiatric drugs - & was forced them; told that I was mentally ill & schizophrenic & told that I would have to take drugs for the rest of my life. I suppose that I am eternally ungrateful for that?

I'm now stuck on the tablets.

I'm trying to work though things & view all this without the biomedical psychiatric model/paradigm - & it's hard; given what I have been through.

I suppose that I can see things from lots of different perspectives - But the one that makes most sense to me is psychological crisis & spiritual emergence/emergency.

I'm hoping that one day I'll be able to successfully come off meds & have a more full life. I'm certainly not getting any younger - & the role of 'long term mental patient' is certainly well entrenched. Who knows at this stage if I'll ever escape from it all?
 
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ramboghettouk

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#54
At the start of care in the community i was encouraged to beleive i was recovered on meds, encouraged to come to london to do a degree get a job, in the end it left me stuck in london which is why i'm so embittered about the word recovery

Resources well it's cuts now

I am very worried about my future particularly as all support has been cut on the grounds i'm high functioning for my illlness, i see a support worker once in a blue moon, most services i don't want so it doesn't bother me so much they've gone but benefits worry, i used to go to the theatre getting tickets from a disability org shape and using a taxicard for disabled people to avoid the tube at night, both cut

Services are now only for those a risk or under sections of the mental health act, hardly the recovered group

You can't get a job so your trapped on benefits, the isolation prevents a lot of ways of making extra, you haven't the contacts

I am afraid i am very cyn ical about the role models, thats what they're paid to say

I also see the idea that the mentaly ill can recover and get jobs been used to underpin welfare reforms
 
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Apotheosis

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#55
I also see the idea that the mentaly ill can recover and get jobs been used to underpin welfare reforms
You make some good points. The fact remains however that many could fully recover if given the right help & support.

I've not personally heard people arguing that medicated schizophrenics are fit for work.

Rambo - do you think that you've had the best treatment & approaches available for your condition?

What is wrong in trying to promote & work towards genuine healing approaches?
 
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Robbert

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#56
Services are now only for those a risk or under sections of the mental health act, hardly the recovered group
I completely agree. The NHS provide little in the way of long term therapeutic support, particularly for people in the 'psychosis' or 'schizophrenia' category. I'm lucky to see my social worker very regularly - the only reason I find him therapeutic is because he is a good guy, and essentially, a friend who I can share my experiences of this all with. But there's nothing rigid for people with severe and enduring mental health conditions on the NHS at all. There's no plan for them. I don't even see any attempt being made to make a plan. When you say there's no support for the 'recovered group', I don't entirely agree about the distinction you make between being sectioned and being 'recovered' - you can be very ill and have absolutely no respite offered to you by the mental health services. It is primarily a service for people at imminent risk to themselves or others, like you say. It's also a service clogged with time wasters and attention seekers. Most of the people I know who have been referred to the psychiatric services fall into this group. They've mostly got a condition I call ''middle class neurosis''. It's very common and highly malignant. But there's nothing a shrink can do about it.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#57
Maybe more could recover if given the right help, but spending money on people unless your going to make profits out of them by them working, and how few recovered people work other than user role models, me working in some minimum wage job is not going to make the state a profit on me on benefits, if you factor in the cost of rehab and the no of working years

Though the language is used to justify welfare reforms, yes there may be doubts whethger i'm fit for work on meds, trouble is the dwp has doubts whether i'm entitled to the severely disabled income support and thats not a fortune
 
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ramboghettouk

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#58
In an ideal world more would recover, but as one psychiatrist said when i said i don't like taking drugs "This is a less than ideal world"

Your talking idealism i'm talking realism, a reality that i feel will get worse due to cuts and when i meet a sticky end, some woukld say it serves me right for my negativity
 
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maudikie

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#59
Not particularly negative, but notalways going forthe support you need or fully accepting your condition.Try to stop worrying about cuts for a short while.. Everythig has been messed about and nothing is yetreally decided.
 
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Apotheosis

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#60
Your talking idealism i'm talking realism
I don't know if it is so idealistic? It's simply stating that there are far better ways of helping people; & acknowledging that some other parts of the World already have such approaches & are working towards them, & that many people have pioneered better ways of approaching these things.

Rambo - Sometimes it seems like your saying that it's best to be med dependant for life, not have any genuine support approaches, & be written off for life - so you can be eligible for government hand outs?

Fair enough that you feel you should be looked after by the state - & I can identify with that position. But the ideal would have been actual genuine help & support to address our problems; or at least to have had the opportunity to. Wouldn't it be better to have some kind of actual, real community? Genuine Asylum if needed - & actual mechanisms of genuine support? Instead we get maintained, managed, & kept on a minimum level of sustenance at the fringes. What's the purpose of treating people like us like this? Who is it really helping, & what is it really solving?

I understand the anxieties & fears around the benefits & future survival - but in that sense; all of us in these circumstances are largely in the same position.