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ramboghettouk

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my friends and similar stories are my experience of off med cures, books say all sorts of things, i'd trust personal experience to any book

What did doubting thomas say unless i can put my fingers in the wounds
 
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ramboghettouk

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i think it depends on which bible you read
 
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ramboghettouk

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i'm going to bed, i sleep 14hrs a night on these drugs unlike your off med lot and i know how much of my life thats costing me, as compared to hospital admissions and a cto
 
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ramboghettouk

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i was under the impression you knew lots of people who were off meds successfully, puzzledd me as everyone with a diagnosis of schitzoprenia who i've seen try has failed
 
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ramboghettouk

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this may be off topic but i received a letter from the salvation army giving advice on handleing the olympics. i saw it as paternalisic, i remember this lecturer who hated paternalism, a member of the new right, when i couldn't get a job after leaving uni he turned out to be the tory counciller responsible for social services in my area, he had cut them to the bone

I remember him saying unlike you i don't beleive it's impossible to come off drugs and went on about the vietnam veterans on heroin, maybe i'm wrong but vietnam veterans there were a no of acts providing support and even then some are still traumatised

I guess the guys view was as people can get better and get jobs theres no need for social services, i do remember another of his views as theres jobs available theres no need for benefits
 
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Apotheosis

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this may be off topic but i received a letter from the salvation army giving advice on handleing the olympics. i saw it as paternalisic, i remember this lecturer who hated paternalism, a member of the new right, when i couldn't get a job after leaving uni he turned out to be the tory counciller responsible for social services in my area, he had cut them to the bone

I remember him saying unlike you i don't beleive it's impossible to come off drugs and went on about the vietnam veterans on heroin, maybe i'm wrong but vietnam veterans there were a no of acts providing support and even then some are still traumatised

I guess the guys view was as people can get better and get jobs theres no need for social services, i do remember another of his views as theres jobs available theres no need for benefits
It's not easy, & it's all a complicated subject. I know that I've gone on about it all a lot; but 4 hospitalisations, 7 major episodes in total, 17 years in addiction/alcoholism & all the rest; has taken it's toll. I do agree, as you know, very much with there being comprehensive help & support given to people - but the fact is that most of us have to largely muddle through on our own. I do agree with you more than you think about it all, but there should be more in the way of comprehensive approaches used. I can dream of a society where the standard is a Soteria/Diabasis/Open Dialogue approach - filled with people like Jung, John Weir Perry, Loren Mosher & Arnold Mindell - But your right that for the majority it's not reality, & such people & approaches are rare.

Regardless; there is a case that those more severely effected are probably sometimes best helped (all things considered & given how things are), with a medication & some kind of state security. I haven't given up with trying to find a fuller life & deeper recovery & healing from things - But I am looking for miracles, & things that given my circumstances are not easy to find.
 
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ramboghettouk

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what makes me sensitive is that ian duncan smith and chris grayling might agree with a lot you say, i am confused they'd probably agree with some of my views particularly on problem neighbours as well
 
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jumbled

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Probably a combination of meds at the very lowest dose and therapy are all the nhs is able to provide atm.
 
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Adam66

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For people who find that neuroliptic drugs work for them - good luck to those people in taking the medicated approach. Certainly, one can make steps towards recovery whilst taking 'medication' - if a person stops having symptoms that they otherwise would have - then there is a partial recovery. Combine this partial recovery with independant living, a return towards their 'normal' level of functioning and they are stable or 'in remission' aided by anti-psychotic medication.

For others, that choose to be "med-free" there is the possibility of full recovery. If that fails they will "relapse" and be required to re-assess their outlook, but if successful they will have the chance of full recovery. This is possible for some people and should be encouraged sometimes.

It seems apparent that all posters in this thread are agreed that each individual case is unique. Different options will work for different people - each person should aim to achieve the best outcome for themselves. For example, some people feel that being med free is not a possibility because they will not handle it and will relapse, in which case it is not a viable aim. However, others, like myself, feel that they will be able to handle it and aim to make a complete recovery.

I think a complete recovery means being free of psychosis, a return to normal functioning and being fit for work. I believe that being on antipsychotic medication is in itself disabling enough to render an individual unfit for work.

Ultimately, the antipsychotic approach provides people with the prospect of being mentally disabled and eligable for benefits, namely ESA and DLA in the UK. Whilst the drug free approach provides people with the prospect of overcoming mental illness and loosing eligability for such benefits. Whilst I would prefer the later I can understand that there are others with a preferance for the former. We all have different aspirations.

In my opinion the mental health system in the UK must change and will change - the question is when (5 years, 10 years, 50 years). It will eventually focus upon recovery from early psychosis as opposed to the blanket maintanance of a lifelong mental disorder. This of course will not work for everyone and some will still battle severe mental illness throughout their lives - but more will recover or have a better prognosis than those that currently do. And yes, more will return to work and get off benefits!

Finally, I believe that forced drugging is abusive and against human rights and Community Treatment Orders the same. But thats another debate entirely!

Best wishes to all posters,
Adam
 
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ramboghettouk

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i was thinking if i had 200k i'd be going round claiming i've recovered better etc etc, i wouldn't have to work so the fact the drugs make me unfit for work wouldn't matter, i also think a lot of the off drug people are unfit for work, unless you count as work hanging round mental health places been pointed out by proffessionals as in recovery
 
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