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More on the enigma of blindness and psychosis

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firemonkee57

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Mar 23, 2009
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A long-standing enigma in psychiatry has been why no-one has been able to find someone who has both congenital blindness and a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The newest and most comprehensive archive study to date has just been published on exactly this issue although it raises more questions than it answers.

Evelina Leivada and Cedric Boeckx from the University of Barcelona in Spain conducted an extensive medical literature search and did come up with some cases of congenital blindness and schizophrenia – 13 in total, although only two case studies (outlining a total of four cases) were found which were convincing enough to be unaffected by other serious problems, like severe genetic disorders.

And these remaining four were hardly straightforward and as one report was from 1943 and the other from 1967 where standards of both vision and psychiatric assessment were significantly short of modern standards.

Notably, all cases of co-occurrence were from blindness due to eye problems or where blindness happened relatively late (after 6 years of age). No cases were found were people had a diagnosis of schizophrenia and were congenitally cortically blind – where blindness was caused by problems with the brain’s visual system.

What this new study provides is weak evidence for the possibility of certain sorts of blindness coexisting with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and more comprehensive support for the curious finding that blindness seems to reduce the risk of developing psychosis.

More on the enigma of blindness and psychosis « Mind Hacks
 
shaky

shaky

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So no news at all then?


Kind of weird though - if being sighted is one of the causes of schizophrenia

have to add that to the list of genetic markers I suppose :shrug:
(It's getting to be quite a long list)
 
Gajolene

Gajolene

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small town Ontario, Canada
This has me very very worried, my eye's have deteriorated really rapidly over the past 2 years. Cataracts and heavy vision loss with rainbow light halo's happening on and off that obstructs my vision, (pre migraine)I do think the quatiapine use has played a big part in this.

I've read the articles on it, will see if I can find it to add to this thread, and all doctors seem to tick a box when I mention I been on them intermitently over a 10 year span now.
My son JS is also having major vision problems from his quatiapine use we have paperwork to verify retina damage as well, but he was on the XR's not the fast acting.

Tell your doctor immediately if you have any of the following symptoms while you are taking quetiapine: extreme thirst, frequent urination, extreme hunger, blurred vision, or weakness. It is very important to call your doctor as soon as you have any of these symptoms, because high blood sugar can cause a serious condition called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis may become life-threatening if it is not treated at an early stage.
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Quetiapine: MedlinePlus Drug Information

I'm know of other similar medications have the same side effects Risperidone being one of them.

Thanks for posting this information firemonkey. :)This is a really important issue we should all be conscious of.
 
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Gajolene

Gajolene

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small town Ontario, Canada
I really agree with what was said at the end of the article.


It’s not that marginalisation, stigma or difficult life circumstances aren’t causal factors in developing psychosis, they clearly are, but ignoring neuro-level explanations outside these effects is equally as narrow as suggesting that they are the only relevant influences.
 
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