• Share. Be Supported. Recover.

    We are a friendly, safe community supporting each other's mental health. We are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Mom has Bipolar Depression and she won't do anything about it... what now?

A

asdfjkl

New member
Joined
Apr 11, 2017
Messages
1
Mom has Bipolar Depression and she won't do anything about it... what now?

Hi everyone, I'm wondering if anyone has any advice on how to go forward...
About two and a half years ago my mom attempted suicide by taking a bunch of pills. She got admitted to a mental hospital for a few weeks and got diagnosed with Bipolar Depression. She was prescribed Latuda for her bipolar and Prozac for her depression.
She took her medication for a while and went to see her psychiatrist pretty regularly. Though things were not perfect, she had days were she felt better. She found a psychologist that she liked and saw her once every month for about six months.
Presently, she refuses to go to her psychiatrist because they make her "mad" and the pills make her feel funny. I do know that she got a refill on Prozac from her general doctor (whether or not she takes it is something I'm not sure about, I don't live at home with her) but I do know she does not take her Latuda anymore. She also does not want to go to her psychologist anymore.
She doesn't do much daily, it's more depression than manic (she did go through some manic phases months after she go released from the hospital). She watches tv and does her crossword puzzles, hardly ever leaves the house. Doesn't do her laundry, very rarely does any chores. She kind of just coasts through her days. When I ask her how she's feeling she says not very good, but that she's going to get herself together (she's been saying this for over a year now). When I ask what she's going to do to change she says she doesn't know.
I can't just force her into a car and make her go to her psychiatrist appointments and make her take her medication.
So what now? My fear is that she's going to attempt the very worst again, although she has said in the past that she would never do that again.
Is there any advice from someone who has bipolar depression or who has someone close to them that has gone through this? I'm not sure how to feel or act anymore.
Thank you in advance.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
17,161
hi,

its really hard having a loved one be mentally ill and you sound quite young so that's a huge burden on you.

There are lots of carers associations about who know exactly what you're going through and can help you with resources etc.

At the end of the day I don't think you should have to be your mums carer, you have a life to be getting on with and she probably doesn't want you to waste it.

can you speak to her doctor?
 
calypso

calypso

Well-known member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2011
Messages
64,173
Location
Lancashire
If you are in Britain, they accept communications from relatives on their behalf. I would contact the pdoc (psychiatrist), tell them about this and see if anyone can send round a CPN (community psychiatric nurse) to talk with your mum. The community team can and should be involved in helping here.
 
dougsan

dougsan

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2015
Messages
12
Location
Eastern Massachusetts
My mum was an alcoholic and was severely depressed. When I returned home to care for my parents (dad had a stroke) I got my mother and father drunk and convinced them into letting my mum sign herself into a hospital for treatment of the alcoholism and depression (this was set up with the doctors). When she came out 60 long days later it became obvious to me she had to have someone at home with her to keep her on her meds. There being no other volunteers, I assumed the role. It took about 6 months of hard work before mum was fine and could function without a live-in caregiver. Sadly she died of lung cancer after a short year.

Maybe with the help available in the US today, maybe mum wouldn't have needed me round-the-clock. But at the time she needed that high level of care and there was no money to hire help.
 
Top