Mindfulness and Osho

Kerome

Kerome

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Joined
Sep 29, 2013
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Europe
#1
I came across a piece on Osho and meditation which I thought applied very well to mindfulness and so I thought I’d write it up here.

Basically he said that his concept of meditation always relied on awareness, and that this came in three stages. First was awareness of the body, it’s state and it’s movements. This is already quite difficult to achieve, but it is marked by a certain kind of gracefulness. Second was awareness of the mind, of thoughts coming and going. Third, and a degree more subtle, was awareness of the emotions, watching their arising. When these three were achieved, a spiritual flowering would follow automatically, and this would lead gradually to enlightenment.

Awareness is a key component of mindfulness, and you could say that a lot of early work of mindfulness is leading up to a more complete awareness of the body. It makes me wonder whether the ultimate stages of mindfulness aren’t the same as Osho’s meditations.

If I can track down the original source clip of this I will post it below.
 
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static void

static void

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Jun 9, 2018
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259
#3
I think that some of his teachings are hard to apply in today's society but meditation is one good thing the Osho recommended to do. He also wrote about different methods, you'll have to find which one works for you.
Scientists now say that the brain is plastic – that we can design new neural structures in the brain that allow us to totally change our attitude to life, our perception of our self and of others, and our behaviour, including our emotions. To change the way we are, we have to consciously create new neural pathways in the brain, and this is possible through meditation or simply by getting out of our comfort zone every single day (that's how you create new habits to replace the old ones that are bad). Indeed Osho teaches that a person needs to be a part of the world, but he also needs to be in it: to live life to the fullest, to accept every emotion that we experience. One doesn't necessarily have to become a monk or ascetic to be able to do it (actually Osho doesn't recommend people to become ascetic).
 
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