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mental health stigma

spoon-racoon

spoon-racoon

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2018
Messages
45
Location
hiding in a trashcan
Next semester I'm planning on writing a research paper, and I'm gonna spitball a few ideas here to help my thought process.

I feel an obligation to do something good with my life. I want my experience and ideas to make a positive impact on the world and I'm far away from reaching that goal, but I'm sure as heck going to try.

I should preface that it isn't my intention to compare the severity of any mental illnesses. Each illness has its own difficulties and related stigma, and they all need to be more understood and accepted in the public eye.

From my experience, I believe that anxiety and depression have seen the most positive change in terms of public acceptance. There's a long way to go, but we've made progress. I think that part of this progress is due to the fact that these disorders are the most "relatable" from a neurotypical standpoint. Non-clinical anxiety and depression are experienced by most people, albeit not nearly to the severity of those with the actual illness. This allows a person to more easily sympathize with anxiety and depression than with other mental illnesses.

It's a different story, however, with the "scary" mental illnesses. Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, personality disorders, and others deserve understanding as well. I have witnessed a severe lack of empathy towards these illnesses compared to anxiety and depression. The current public view of these mental illnesses is so, so damaging to those who suffer from them.

I don't have the energy to really make my point right now. Basically, I believe that the way mental illness is portrayed in society is internalized and causes turmoil within the mentally ill. We are not bad people. We are sick and we need treatment. We do NOT need to be told that we are crazy, evil, or something to laugh at.

If you agree, disagree, or have something else to say, I would love to hear from you! Ideas and opinions are never set in stone and I realize that I still have a lot to learn. If you read this far, thanks for listening <3
 
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natalie

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2014
Messages
11,589
HI Spoon-Racoon,


This is something I'm interested in;


For many many years, I have wanted to break the barriers of mental health stigma, and I feel, at long last I just might have been able to have done that;


I personally do have mental health szchiophrenia issues, such as hearing voices, and delusions, also anxiety on occasions, and even though personally I have always always worked out in fitness, and attended zumba gold dance classes, (note I am on medication), and I'll volunteer in charitible organisations in the North West of London.

Now I feel, that maybe at long last, the barrier has been broken, I volunteer in a mental health residential care home, and I help out with Administration - typing. Now I have been wishing to show in years, that even though I do have mental health issues, I can also volunteer, in other organisations, I might not have been able to have broken the stigma attaching mental health, because they are not geared up for mental health, so I am in the right charitible organisation background, and that I am able to volunteer combined with, mental health issues.

I have felt also, that in years, we as mental health sufferers or recovered well from pshycotic and mental health issues on med, have been and I am g oing to borrow your quote, were always portrayed, and that people, outside of mental health, could maybe not see, the good light, via mental health recoverers, in a very good way.


And I have to agree, we are not crazy strange people, we belong in the general society just like everyone else without mental health problems, and further more, mental health is a hidden condition, is not somethiin whic one can spot, right away, if someone had physically a broken leg, or a broken arm, people would be acting more kindly, in offering, eg their seat on buses or trains, with mental health, this just can't be done.


Best Wishes, and i do like your post, by the way, I have mainly szchiophrenia in mild problematic forms, and glean towards slightly, bipolar, I feel, i am more szchophrenia character, myself. I know this, from when I have had mental health specific testing done.


Natalie.
 
Kerome

Kerome

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2013
Messages
12,748
Location
Europe
I agree, the less stigma the better! Around here they are now giving mental health first aid courses, and a variety of folks sign up so that the courses are always full. It helps to fight stigma by spreading the right kind of information, 99% of mental health patients are totally harmless.
 
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natalie

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2014
Messages
11,589
Hi Folks,

Another point I had overloooked, and i do agree, with Kerome, and that's this; we as szchiophrenia sufferers or recoverers, are not harmful people, these years, there has been such bad light over us, and not all don't go out acting in criminal style, far from it, we are positive behaved just like everybody else, without problems, and we are all like normal people except as I pointed out, mental health being hidden, cannot be easily seen, and we need to get to re address t his issue.


I do like this topic, we spoke about Mental h ealth stigma at my day centre branch Mental health education session. So we were even talking about breaking stigma hopefully, at that point of time.


Regards All,


Natalie.
 
T

Twokiwisandabanana

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 23, 2016
Messages
811
The stigma is because people don't understand it
Enless you've been through it yourself or met a friend who has it why would you understand it
That's why it's important for people to speak out about it
Like prince Harry is there anything uncool about prince Harry LOL
 
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