Mend the Gap: A New Hope for Mental Health.

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Mend the Gap: A New Hope for Mental Health. | Emotional Wellness

Katie Mottram, a friend of mine, has just published her book Mend the Gap: A Transformative Journey from Deep Despair to Spiritual Awakening.

Katie speaks candidly from a very unique position having lived with a mother who was diagnosed with a serious mental health condition when she was young, and who tried to kill herself; having worked within the mental health profession; and having experienced her own serious symptoms, which could very well have been compartmentalised as a mental health disorder.

We Are Not Mad!

Katie writes of how she firmly believes mental health conditions are not necessarily a result of ‘madness’ and that individuals are actually experiencing a spiritual awakening, symptoms of which can cause depression, anxiety, mood swings, supernatural-type experiences, hearing voices, headaches, lethargy. She is currently working with mental health professionals to pioneer changes to the current understanding of mental health conditions, within the psychiatric profession.

Diagnosis and Harsh Treatments

As a result, those who are experiencing these symptoms are categorised into a box and labelled as having Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia, Borderline Personality Disorder, or some other scary sounding diagnosis.

Individuals are given strong medications to numb them, even heavy anti-psychotic medications and electro-convulsive therapy- which Katie has witnessed first hand and found traumatic to watch.

But what if we were to listen to their experiences and take them seriously?

Mental Health Issue v Spiritual Crisis | Emotional Wellness

Spiritual crisis - Wikipedia
 
naominash

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That's really sad what happened to her mother.

When I went through both my episodes, I felt like I was in a spiritual war zone. I felt like I had to fight demons. It was scary.

I remember I would drop a pencil and it would move as if someone else was moving it.

I'm intrigued about what others have to say about spiritual crisis. Cause it was not fun.
 
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That's really sad what happened to her mother.

When I went through both my episodes, I felt like I was in a spiritual war zone. I felt like I had to fight demons. It was scary.

I remember I would drop a pencil and it would move as if someone else was moving it.

I'm intrigued about what others have to say about spiritual crisis. Cause it was not fun.
There's a vast amount written on things from the perspectives of psychological/spiritual crisis.

Let alone some 70,000 years of Shamanism.
 
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naominash

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According to this link,

It's like your turning into a shaman or spiritual healer.

I remember getting into the mind of Eve in the garden and talking with God candidly. It was like a beautiful conversation between a loving father and a daughter who made a big mistake.

I remember it was as if I went all the way back and got memories of God teaching Eve new things and even how to create things from nothing with spirit power.

It was weird. It was awesome.

Verrry interesting.
 
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According to this link,

It's like your turning into a shaman or spiritual healer.
This is a very long running argument/debate & goes back to the Ancient Greeks, if Not before, concerning the nature of 'madness', & nature of Self/Reality.

There simply are correlations between what comes under mystical, shamanic & psychotic states.

There is obviously a major difference within the individual who has genuinely healed him/herself.
 
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I don't discount what your saying cpu but sometimes I feel all would be better if every so often we could go into mental hospital the way people with mental health problem did up to 1994//95

My Paternal PTSD riddled Grandfather used to go into mental hospital for six months every ten years.
 
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I don't discount what your saying cpu but sometimes I feel all would be better if every so often we could go into mental hospital the way people with mental health problem did up to 1994//95

My Paternal PTSD riddled Grandfather used to go into mental hospital for six months every ten years.
i do believe that places of genuine sanctuary & asylum are needed. i would argue for certain models/approaches it should all be based on.

But yes, people are in need of more comprehensive/appropriate care & support.

What do you suggest that we do? i have zero say in the UK mental health law/policy/protocols/services - i just continually engage in trying to raise awareness of what i see as far better & more humane/comprehensive understandings & approaches to mental health in whatever ways that i can, with anyone that will listen, & also get continually attacked for it all by a percentage of people. What else can i do?
 
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i do believe that places of genuine sanctuary & asylum are needed. i would argue for certain models/approaches it should all be based on.

But yes, people are in need of more comprehensive/appropriate care & support.

What do you suggest that we do? i have zero say in the UK mental health law/policy/protocols/services - i just continually engage in trying to raise awareness of what i see as far better & more humane/comprehensive understandings & approaches to mental health in whatever ways that i can, with anyone that will listen, & also get continually attacked for it all by a percentage of people. What else can i do?
Some of the best hope for genuinely improving mental health treatment in the UK currently, imo, is coming from such places as the critical psychiatry network, Open Dialogue Projects, SCN, HVN, Asylum Magazine/Mad Pride, & other associated grass roots projects/people. & look at the general opposition to it all! This is what i don't really get NG - people/areas really trying everything that they can to improve things are thwarted/blocked at every turn, by the majority of society, the establishment, & what is most Mad, very often by mental health charities themselves & a lot of the 'service user' community. Since posting on-line over the past 12 or so years i'm sorry But i don't get it? i don't understand the opposition to better treatment, it doesn't make sense.
 
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Some of the best hope for genuinely improving mental health treatment in the UK currently, imo, is coming from such places as the critical psychiatry network, Open Dialogue Projects, SCN, HVN, Asylum Magazine/Mad Pride, & other associated grass roots projects/people. & look at the general opposition to it all! This is what i don't really get NG - people/areas really trying everything that they can to improve things are thwarted/blocked at every turn, by the majority of society, the establishment, & what is most Mad, very often by mental health charities themselves & a lot of the 'service user' community. Since posting on-line over the past 12 or so years i'm sorry But i don't get it? i don't understand the opposition to better treatment, it doesn't make sense.
I bet if you follow the money, you'd see why.

Medication and pharmaceutical drugs are where the money's at. Open dialogue? Not so much.
 
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I bet if you follow the money, you'd see why.

Medication and pharmaceutical drugs are where the money's at. Open dialogue? Not so much.
Yea, i know, But that doesn't fully explain the general societal attitudes to it all, & Nor the general attitudes of the mental health community.
 
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Yea, i know, But that doesn't fully explain the general societal attitudes to it all, & Nor the general attitudes of the mental health community.
Well, that could be because when some people think mental illness, they think Columbine and Ft. Lauderdale or whatever famous shooting you want to name.

There's a lot of fear in the mental health community and in people's general attitudes.

I saw an episode of Law & Order SVU about someone with schizophrenia. It was frightening!
 
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Well, that could be because when some people think mental illness, they think Columbine and Ft. Lauderdale or whatever famous shooting you want to name.

There's a lot of fear in the mental health community and in people's general attitudes.

I saw an episode of Law & Order SVU about someone with schizophrenia. It was frightening!
It's Not an accurate/full picture.