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Medication and statistics

U

Until

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Feb 11, 2020
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uk
I am against medication for BPD, I don't believe there is any medication that helps a BPD personally and actually there is no medication recommended for a BPT.

I know there is a couple of therapies for BPD, one is DBT and CBT. One or the other can work for some, but if not what do you do, you can visit a psychotherapist if you can afford it, or try to manage your emotions.

I have got better at managing my emotions recently, I can control them more than I used to , although there are still times that the emotion just comes out, such as anger and I react if someone I know does something that hurts me, it is like I forget all the times they are nice to me and focus on the time they are horrible. I go from liking or loving them to hating them the next and it shows, that is hard to control. How I feel about myself is hard to control, like berating myself -did I do or say the wrong thing etc. also and I have abandonment issues.

I hate the term borderline, it makes people think you are on the edge of craziness or something, which is why I don't announce it, it could change how they feel about you, make them on edge or notice every little thing you do and say that's because she's borderline. It gives you a label.

Interesting statistic and this is quite a lot of people with BPD...

Around 1 in 100 people have BPD in UK, more women than men are more likely to be given this diagnosis.



 
O

On Fire

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Joined
Sep 21, 2011
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258
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Unless there is paranoia/psychosis, then there surely is a role for antipsychotic medications.
 
N

Nukelavee

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Dec 17, 2019
Messages
2,184
Location
London, ON
Depends on how you look at it. I take medications to reduce my depression and anxiety, and another to "dull" my emotions. Light doses, just enough to let myself keep control of my emotions.

One reason thaat women seem to get BPD more, is because males are often misdiagnosed. On the other hand, males with BPD are nearly twice as likely to commit suicide as women with it.
 
L

Lavendergirl

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
109
Location
London
I am against medication for BPD, I don't believe there is any medication that helps a BPD personally and actually there is no medication recommended for a BPT.

I know there is a couple of therapies for BPD, one is DBT and CBT. One or the other can work for some, but if not what do you do, you can visit a psychotherapist if you can afford it, or try to manage your emotions.

I have got better at managing my emotions recently, I can control them more than I used to , although there are still times that the emotion just comes out, such as anger and I react if someone I know does something that hurts me, it is like I forget all the times they are nice to me and focus on the time they are horrible. I go from liking or loving them to hating them the next and it shows, that is hard to control. How I feel about myself is hard to control, like berating myself -did I do or say the wrong thing etc. also and I have abandonment issues.

I hate the term borderline, it makes people think you are on the edge of craziness or something, which is why I don't announce it, it could change how they feel about you, make them on edge or notice every little thing you do and say that's because she's borderline. It gives you a label.

Interesting statistic and this is quite a lot of people with BPD...

Around 1 in 100 people have BPD in UK, more women than men are more likely to be given this diagnosis.



Can I ask how you have managed to cope better with your emotions
Is there anything in particular that has helped
 
U

Until

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
141
Location
uk
Depends on how you look at it. I take medications to reduce my depression and anxiety, and another to "dull" my emotions. Light doses, just enough to let myself keep control of my emotions.

One reason thaat women seem to get BPD more, is because males are often misdiagnosed. On the other hand, males with BPD are nearly twice as likely to commit suicide as women with it.
I can understand how some take medications for depression and many other issues, but there is no recommended medication for BPD.

However I can see why some want to take something to dull emotions. I personally don't want to take anything as the downside is that you can't really feel happiness or joy as these emotions are dulled also, But each person is different and it is up to an individual if they want to take a medication that could help. I personally don't want to for BPD.

BPD is commonly misdiagnosed as Bipolar Disorder, so that may account for some misdiagnosis in men I would think, and women.
 
U

Until

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Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
141
Location
uk
Can I ask how you have managed to cope better with your emotions
Is there anything in particular that has helped
Since I have researched (I am an avid reader) some of it is hard to take that this is me, but it is, I can recognise myself in nearly all of the traits of a BPD.

One thing I have not done is self harmed, although some could argue I used to drink way too much and I guess that is a form of self harming. I still drink but I don't go too far anymore, I've not been drunk for a very long time.

I believe from what I now know about who I am and what BPD is, is that I can recognise a feeling coming on, because they are the same emotions and reactions I have always had to the same scenarios. I tell myself, here comes that old familiar again, sounds daft but that's what I do, I talk to myself, not out loud of course!

Sometimes I have to make myself get up and leave the room when it's really bad to give myself a few minutes to gather myself, then I come back and don't speak a word, as I know as soon as I do there will be a torrent of an emotion, like anger for example, if someone has upset me say.


The feelings are still in my head, they don't just disappear I am still feeling them, but I don't say what I am feeling out loud, not straight away and not until I have had time to think about what I want to say and how to say it. This does not always work. I can't always control my impulses. But it has improved to where I can see a difference and I am sure people I know can aswell.

If I can't leave for a while then I repeat to myself in my head don't react, don't you do it. I still have to say something, I can't let things go, but I can say it in a better way than I used to if I give myself some time .

When I catch myself berating myself in my head for something, I say, see you are doing it again and shout stop in my head!

It's a start and is helping me.
 
L

Lavendergirl

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
109
Location
London
Since I have researched (I am an avid reader) some of it is hard to take that this is me, but it is, I can recognise myself in nearly all of the traits of a BPD.

One thing I have not done is self harmed, although some could argue I used to drink way too much and I guess that is a form of self harming. I still drink but I don't go too far anymore, I've not been drunk for a very long time.

I believe from what I now know about who I am and what BPD is, is that I can recognise a feeling coming on, because they are the same emotions and reactions I have always had to the same scenarios. I tell myself, here comes that old familiar again, sounds daft but that's what I do, I talk to myself, not out loud of course!

Sometimes I have to make myself get up and leave the room when it's really bad to give myself a few minutes to gather myself, then I come back and don't speak a word, as I know as soon as I do there will be a torrent of an emotion, like anger for example, if someone has upset me say.


The feelings are still in my head, they don't just disappear I am still feeling them, but I don't say what I am feeling out loud, not straight away and not until I have had time to think about what I want to say and how to say it. This does not always work. I can't always control my impulses. But it has improved to where I can see a difference and I am sure people I know can aswell.

If I can't leave for a while then I repeat to myself in my head don't react, don't you do it. I still have to say something, I can't let things go, but I can say it in a better way than I used to if I give myself some time .

When I catch myself berating myself in my head for something, I say, see you are doing it again and shout stop in my head!

It's a start and is helping me.
Thank you for replying it means a lot
I'm so glad your coping strategies work
I sure it takes lots of effort and determination
But it goes to prove we have choices when we choose to use them
 
N

Nukelavee

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 17, 2019
Messages
2,184
Location
London, ON
I can understand how some take medications for depression and many other issues, but there is no recommended medication for BPD.
BPD can be co-morbid with things like depression and anxiety, which can contribute to dysregulation. Like, I can normally handle my moods, I have the control to do so, but - add in anxiety or a deep depression, and it exceeds my ability to cope.

So, the meds remove that layer of stress, which allows me to better stay aware of my actual moods. So, they don't directly help, but they do help my overall state.

The thing is - I don't really do happy or joy, dulling those isn't much of an issue. IT's like, my meds decrease my libido. Which would be an issue, I guess, except I have serious intimacy issues. It causes me to dissociate, which is really unpleasant. So, having my libido tuned down is actually a plus in my opinion. For me.
If I can't leave for a while then I repeat to myself in my head don't react, don't you do it
Yeah, I do this a lot, myself.
 
U

Until

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
141
Location
uk
Thank you for replying it means a lot
I'm so glad your coping strategies work
I sure it takes lots of effort and determination
But it goes to prove we have choices when we choose to use them

I don't know if it's a choice, it's more of a coping mechanism, like trying to control some parts of BPD that I can, although it does not stop the feelings, which are still there, it's just most of the time, not all, stops the reaction that people can see or hear.

I can't make a choice to be not BPD, if I could then I wouldn't be BPD, but it's not possible to just say my choice is not to be BPD so I am not. It is not like a magic wand I can wave or anyone with BPD can wave and say my choice is not to be BPD. If it were that simple no one would have disorders or issues and no one would be on medication.

But I am trying to control some things so that others do not see or hear my emotions and impulses.
 
L

Lavendergirl

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
109
Location
London
I don't know if it's a choice, it's more of a coping mechanism, like trying to control some parts of BPD that I can, although it does not stop the feelings, which are still there, it's just most of the time, not all, stops the reaction that people can see or hear.

I can't make a choice to be not BPD, if I could then I wouldn't be BPD, but it's not possible to just say my choice is not to be BPD so I am not. It is not like a magic wand I can wave or anyone with BPD can wave and say my choice is not to be BPD. If it were that simple no one would have disorders or issues and no one would be on medication.

But I am trying to control some things so that others do not see or hear my emotions and impulses.
 
L

Lavendergirl

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
109
Location
London
Yes I totally get that
I'm sorry you suffer this crap on a daily basis
Yes I wish we all had magic wands
Sometimes people sail through life
But so many just have rubbish to deal with constantly hugs.
 
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