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lying to myself all the time, do you do it?

M

mickeymoo

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2010
Messages
427
I always find im lying to myself and it drives me mad. I am thinking something and I know its not true all at the same time? Not feeling paranoid when I do though.

Does anyone else do this or am I alone in doing it? Why do I do it and how can I stop?
 
B

Buddha

Active member
Joined
Mar 9, 2010
Messages
32
Lying to oneself

Hi,

I don't think that you are alone in thinking something and knowing that your thoughts are not true. Thinking happens by itself and internal self talk goes on in most people's experience. We find ourselves 'talking' to ourselves about some person or situation and drawing all sorts of conclusions.

As long as we can recognize that all that talk and conclusions are not true - and catch ourselves lying, as you say - I don't suppose there is a problem. It only becomes a problem when we believe in all the lies.

How to stop such internal dialogue and 'lies'?

Meditation is one time tested way. As I understand it, it is discovering that all the self talk, thoughts and ideas that go around in the head - are not what you really are. Ordinarily we drive our sense of identity from our thoughts about ourselves and the world. When we see that thoughts and ideas are just that and have no truth or reality in them - we learn to watch and observe them - with out indulging in them - or getting annoyed about experiencing thoughts.

There are quite a few excellent videos on the following website, if you want to explore this sort of way of looking at thoughts and understanding mind further:

http://www.adyashanti.org
 
S

*Sapphire*

Guest
As I understand it, it is discovering that all the self talk, thoughts and ideas that go around in the head - are not what you really are. Ordinarily we drive our sense of identity from our thoughts about ourselves and the world. When we see that thoughts and ideas are just that and have no truth or reality in them - we learn to watch and observe them - with out indulging in them - or getting annoyed about experiencing thoughts.
That is fascinating. I have been trying to do this, although with intense emotions I find it difficult at times. I must say it has helped me immensly to observe my thoughts and not get caught up in judgements. I am thrilled an alleged psychiatrist understands this.

If our thoughts are not our true identity, then who are we? Where does our identity come from, what makes up an identity?
 
B

Buddha

Active member
Joined
Mar 9, 2010
Messages
32
Great questions

That's right. Who are we? or Who am I? What am I?

Arriving at the above questions means that we have already looked at what we are not. Emotions are understandably more difficult to watch without getting entangled in. As long as we are not deriving a sense of identity or self from emotions, thoughts, ideas and beliefs; as humans we are conditioned to respond to emotions and perceptions - until there hold loosens and finally drops.

:)
 
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