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Jung

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Apotheosis

Guest
Jung worked at the Burghölzli clinic from 1900 to 1909. He was also a lecturer in psychiatry at the University of Zurich . Jung worked under Eugen Bleuler who introduced the term schizophrenia as a replacement for the concept of dementia praecox.

In 1907 he drew an association between the content of dreams and the content of hallucinations and delusions. He utilized Freud’s theories to help understand what on the surface seemed incomprehensible. For Jung, it was the feeling-toned complex, not the dream, which was the royal road to the unconscious. Similar to the postmodern views of a multiplicity of selves, Jung saw the individual as being made up of many selves, which are autonomous and therefore we cannot assume the unity of consciousness or the primacy of will. Jung relates complexes and psychosis, with a view of the latter as a type of waking dream:

“A person with a strong complex thinks in terms of the complex, he dreams with open eyes and no longer adapts psychologically to the environment. ... in schizophrenia the complexes have become disconnected and autonomous fragments, which either do not reintegrate back to the psychic totality, or, in the case of a remission, are unexpectedly joined together again as if nothing happened”.


This latter viewpoint is remarkably consistent with our current understanding of the pervasive effects of profound anxiety/stress on CNS structure and function. Jung accused psychiatry of reductionistic materialism, i.e., placing the organ of the brain above its functions. Jung, in his collection of detailed patient histories, discovered that the schizophrenic illness often occurred within the context of significant trauma:

“When we penetrate into the human secrets of our patients, the madness discloses the system upon which it is based, and we recognize insanity to be simply an unusual reaction to emotional problems which are in no wise foreign to ourselves”.


Jung believed that once we understood the ‘code’ of psychotic communication we may then be able to put together the chain of events that led to the emergence of a psychotic episode:

“These forces did not originate in our patient out of nowhere. They are most emphatically not the result of poisoned brain cells, but are normal constituents of our unconscious psyche. They appeared in numberless dreams, in the same or a similar form, at a time of life when seemingly nothing was wrong. And they appear in dreams of normal people who never get anywhere near a psychosis”.


Towards the end of his life, Jung believed that if patients were treated only with pharmacological agents, to leave their internal life unanalyzed was to leave patients with little means of being able to take care of themselves in their everyday lives.

In 1958, Jung commented on his life-long experience:

“It is now just about fifty years since I became convinced, through practical experience, that schizophrenic disturbances could be treated and cured by psychological means. I found that, with respect to the treatment, the schizophrenic patient behaves no differently from the neurotic. He has the same complexes, the same insights and needs, but not the same certainty with regard to his foundations. Whereas the neurotic can rely instinctively on his personality dissociation never losing its systematic character, so that the unity and inner cohesion of the whole are never seriously jeopardized, the latent schizophrenic must always reckon with the possibility that his very foundations will give way somewhere, that an irretrievable disintegration will set in, that his ideas and concepts will lose their cohesion and their connection with other spheres of association and with the environment. As a result, he feels threatened by an uncontrollable chaos of chance happenings. He stands on treacherous ground, and very often he knows it.

The dangerousness of his situation often shows itself in terrifying dreams of cosmic catastrophes, of the end of the world and such things. Or the ground he stands on begins to heave, the walls bend and bulge, the solid earth turns to water, a storm carries him up into the air, all his relatives are dead, etc. These images bear witness to a fundamental disturbance of relationship, that is, of the patient’s rapport with his surroundings, and graphically illustrate the isolation that menaces him”.


Jung, after many years of clinical experience concluded:

“I have now, after long practical experience, come to hold the view that the psychogenic causation of the disease is more probable than the toxic [physico-chemical] causation. There are a number of mild and ephemeral but manifestly schizophrenic illnesses - quite apart from the even more common latent psychoses - which begin purely psychogenically, run an equally psychological course (aside from certain presumably toxic nuances) and can be completely cured by a purely psychotherapeutic procedure. I have seen this even in severe cases”.

http://www.isps-us.org/koehler/on_jung.htm

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A

Apotheosis

Guest
Jung, after many years of clinical experience concluded:

“I have now, after long practical experience, come to hold the view that the psychogenic causation of the disease is more probable than the toxic [physico-chemical] causation. There are a number of mild and ephemeral but manifestly schizophrenic illnesses - quite apart from the even more common latent psychoses - which begin purely psychogenically, run an equally psychological course (aside from certain presumably toxic nuances) and can be completely cured by a purely psychotherapeutic procedure. I have seen this even in severe cases”.
I'll go with Jung on this. At least he helped cure his patients; instead of making them into Chemical repositories.
 
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binthair

Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
15
I have found myself more drawn to Jung's work than to say Freud's. His work with the conscious and the unconscious, types and archetypes and synchronicity for example, seem to make sense to me and how I have felt when I have been down.

Does anyone else try to see their symptoms in Jungian terms so to speak?
 
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saffron

Guest
I like this quote, : he define neurosis as 'the suffering of the soul which has not discovered its meaning.'

I find his work very complimentary to Carl Rogers.

I do agree that when I do look at myself deeply it rings true that most of my 'problems' are to do with how I do not believe in myself enough, and that I do not think this is a chemical imbalance but one of a purely subconscious one and that it can be positively changed so that I an function better as an individual and a human being. At the moment I am fighting against my thoughts and my fears. But then I beleive I do have paranoid personality disorder, have I got this through nurture or nature? who knows. But I can remember feeling like this for as long as I can remember. So maybe I should just execpt who I am because some things may indeed be natural to me. It would be false to try and change it.

S
 
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jamesdean

Guest
:salut:One day apotheosis I'm going to sit and read all your threads/posts because you write some extremely interesting things I just dont have the concentration levels that is needed, :study:You really should write a book about all your experence of life and I mean this sincerly take care James
ps (I'm hoping that going to the daycentre is going to help me learn new eductional skills god only knows I need it):D
 
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Apotheosis

Guest
Thank you James. I did start writing a book. I wrote the first two chapters. I ought to have a go at finishing it. I know what is going to be in it & what it is about - it is just a case of writing it.

A book is so much more different to write than an article or shorter essay. A book must have continuity; a framework of consistency. My idea was to "flesh" out the whole book - by simply hammering out the entire story; then to keep going over the whole thing & re-reading & refining it. It isn't simply a "life story", but much more than that. I have run it by people & they appear very interested & said that they would read it. Maybe I should have another go at writing it? If only for it being a cathartic experience.
 
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jamesdean

Guest
Could you not actually have someone write/type it for you, do they call that a ghost writer?
I find all these biography's by so called celebraties a rip off whos to say that their lifes have been that interseting just another way of making even more money but I do understand that people who do like reading will read a book like you are proposing because its educational I really think you should have a go. James
 
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Apotheosis

Guest
I don't think it would be the same - if it was ghost written - Although the main outline is simple in a sense - it is also quite original in a way. I could always get people to proof read it. It is very much a case though of doing it. & getting it done properly; I think would take years. Just the thought of writing a book is very daunting. I find getting out of bed in the morning hard enough. :p

You could write a book too. Everyone has a story to tell. There is a "MH" press; I forget the name of it now? I will have to look into it.
 
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IDream

Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2009
Messages
24
Location
UK, Liverpool
Jung, after many years of clinical experience concluded:

“I have now, after long practical experience, come to hold the view that the psychogenic causation of the disease is more probable than the toxic [physico-chemical] causation. There are a number of mild and ephemeral but manifestly schizophrenic illnesses - quite apart from the even more common latent psychoses - which begin purely psychogenically, run an equally psychological course (aside from certain presumably toxic nuances) and can be completely cured by a purely psychotherapeutic procedure. I have seen this even in severe cases”.
Amen to that - the more I read of Jung's stuff the more impressed I am - he was a true great.
 
I

IDream

Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2009
Messages
24
Location
UK, Liverpool
In 1958, Jung commented on his life-long experience:

“It is now just about fifty years since I became convinced, through practical experience, that schizophrenic disturbances could be treated and cured by psychological means. I found that, with respect to the treatment, the schizophrenic patient behaves no differently from the neurotic. He has the same complexes, the same insights and needs, but not the same certainty with regard to his foundations. Whereas the neurotic can rely instinctively on his personality dissociation never losing its systematic character, so that the unity and inner cohesion of the whole are never seriously jeopardized, the latent schizophrenic must always reckon with the possibility that his very foundations will give way somewhere, that an irretrievable disintegration will set in, that his ideas and concepts will lose their cohesion and their connection with other spheres of association and with the environment. As a result, he feels threatened by an uncontrollable chaos of chance happenings. He stands on treacherous ground, and very often he knows it.
I mis-quoted originally, it's this bit that rings so true with me.

The last bit about being on "treacherous ground" is exactly how I "feel" my illness.
 
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