• Welcome! It’s great to see you. Our forum members are people, maybe like yourself, who experience mental health difficulties or who have had them at some point in their life.

    If you'd like to talk with people who know what it's like

Is it even possible for Anxiety to cause such severe Paranoia?

The_Sun_Shines

The_Sun_Shines

Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2020
Messages
14
Location
United Kingdom
My wife, the sweetest person ever, had to stop working 3 months ago due to a paranoia condition that affected her sleep and caused her anxiety and fear of going outside etc.
Her paranoid delusions have included: Showering with the light off for fear of being recorded on camera. Not having sex for fear of being recorded on camera and that videos would be sent to her family. Plots to kill her, from former employers to friends and associates. Fearing she owes money when she doesn't.
Imagining people have told her things that they have never told her.
Eg: "He/she told me that people in work didn't want me to return" or "He/she told me that a man phoned my work leaving threatening messages toward me." when in reality this never happened.
She's also experienced images flashing - violent images accompanied by bad thoughts of her family being hurt.

It seems because we first contacted an out of hours GP in the early hours of the morning, mentioning that she couldn't sleep as a result of her paranoia/anxiety/fears... that from this point the GP doctors aim was to cure her "Sleep problems" as this can cause paranoia.

She was first given Citalopram and Zopiclone but this made her light headed, spaced out and she had heart palpitations so stopped.

She was then given Diazepam for nights but by the next day she had nothing for her paranoia/anxiety/fears, so her symptoms continued.

I took her to A&E and they then made her an emergency case for mental health assessment. Unfortunately their approach was horrendous and of no theraputic value at all. However, a couple of the doctors from this team did eventually prescribe her with a medication that fortunately started to alleviate her symtoms. This was Quetiapine (Seroquel) and Mirtazapine.

However, the aim of this was still to solved the issue of her sleep problems... With little no focus being on her paranoia.
The idea being that curing her sleep troubles would stop the anxiety/paranoia.

I believe this is wrong. Although it may well be true that lack of sleep can lead to anxiety that can cause some degree of paranoia, this is different because she is having actual delusions, imaging she's been told things by friends/family that she wasn't told and completely irrational thinking, plots against her etc.

The Quetiapine and Mirtzapine are working as a sleeping pill before bed/during the night, and the quetiapine eases her anxities in the day - in as much as reducing her fears so that she feels able to go out and even wants to.

However, she is still washing in the dark for fear of hidden cameras in her home, and still has occional low points in the day where she doesn't even trust me (the one helpign her 24/7). She also has occasional full relapses about once a week for maybe 2-3 hours in a day or night. Most often this is before her night dose of Mirtazapine which helps and lets her sleep.

Before her paranoia developed she never had any trouble sleeping. She was always the sort to fall asleep as soon as her head hit the pillow. I'm also concerned that since it's her paranoia needs medicated which would allow to sleep, not vice versa which is how she's being treated, that she may build up a dependecy to sleeping pills, which she never had before.

How do I convince these doctors/nurses/social workers that a mistake has been made from the beginning?
They have tried to paint a bad picture of me as interferring which was total BS. I only ever voiced her concerns and
offered my insight from knowing her 10 years and being with her supporting her 24/7 but they've been to arrogant to even respect my insight. During their talk sessions with her, they even told me to leave the room and wait outside, even though all I was doing was holding her hand for moral support. The whole so called "treatment" became a battle of them trying to drive a wedge between us so they could assume total control opf their patient, and me showing relentless tenacity to keep on top of how things were going, despite all their efforts to excommunicate me.

I think this is because one doctor wanted her to become a voluntary inpatient and tried to trick her into agreeing to this by dressing up his words deceptively. So when I asked him to clarify what he meant, and she said "No I'd be scared" (which she'd already told me) and when this doctor witnessed how I was able to steer her away from this trap, from then he had the team constantly being against me and only offering me a minute to say what ever I wanted to say (which they didn;t care about) at the end of each session.

Fortunately she is now discharged by that team, but the trouble now is the incompetence of her social worker who isn't helping us with finding out her diagnosis, despite telling us she would.

Any helpful advice would be much appreciated 🙏
 
E

EclipticNight

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 27, 2020
Messages
62
Location
Orleans vermont.
Its possible for anxiety to cause paranoia. I dont go out in public ever. Feels like people are watching me and talking about me. I van listen to people and my brain wants me to still think its some strange plot. I also take seroquel but for a sleep disorder that keeps me awake all night. I need it to regulate my sleep to 9 hours or i work on a 25 hour clock.

I can't guess what is wrong with your wife but it is my personal belief that your insight would be invaluable to finding out. You spend your life with her, you know her better than anyone. I would understand having you leave once but after that its your choice. If your wife wants you there then no doctor can kick you out. There are plenty more out there so dont loose hope. Its her diagnosis and treatment thats important.
 
GhostOfLenin

GhostOfLenin

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 16, 2020
Messages
3,447
Location
Glasgow
Yup my pal is agoraphobic. She is not schizophrenic or anything but she can't leave the house just through fear and paranoia. Horrible disease
 
The_Sun_Shines

The_Sun_Shines

Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2020
Messages
14
Location
United Kingdom
Its possible for anxiety to cause paranoia. I dont go out in public ever. Feels like people are watching me and talking about me. I van listen to people and my brain wants me to still think its some strange plot. I also take seroquel but for a sleep disorder that keeps me awake all night. I need it to regulate my sleep to 9 hours or i work on a 25 hour clock.

I can't guess what is wrong with your wife but it is my personal belief that your insight would be invaluable to finding out. You spend your life with her, you know her better than anyone. I would understand having you leave once but after that its your choice. If your wife wants you there then no doctor can kick you out. There are plenty more out there so dont loose hope. Its her diagnosis and treatment thats important.

Unfortunately it seems there's very limited options for mention health in my region, especially with the lockdown situation, but I'll keep exploring.
I understand paranoia can come from anxiety, but even now that her anxiety/fears of going out are alleviated by the medication, her paranoid thoughts/confusion and occasional images etc continue.

I suspect it's more like a form of schizophrenia developed, or psychosis. But I suppose it's possible that anxiety may have been the root cause of that developing.

It just seems now that it's developed, that paranoia is the main issue and continues regardless of the medication.
 
The_Sun_Shines

The_Sun_Shines

Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2020
Messages
14
Location
United Kingdom
Yup my pal is agoraphobic. She is not schizophrenic or anything but she can't leave the house just through fear and paranoia. Horrible disease

Yeah mental illness is very tragic. The medication has alleviated her fear of going out but the paranoid thoughts still persist.
 
jajingna

jajingna

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 31, 2020
Messages
2,097
Location
Canada
Its possible for anxiety to cause paranoia.
I have found this to be true as well. Extreme anxiety, stress, not sleeping much for many days, can lead to some horrible mental states, possibly, depends on the person. All that stuff, the wicked prolonged anxiety, put me into a state of psychosis before, and paranoia was part of the experience.
 
Top