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kiwozok

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Nov 11, 2014
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Hello - I am hoping someone out there can give me some tips. My daughter hears voices all the time although she insists that its not voices and that people are actually saying the things she hears - mostly its through the walls but sometimes not. What she hears is not what is being said (I can say this from experience) - it is mostly always sexual e.g., she will say the nurses who deliver her meds tell her she has to have sex with them (sometimes explicit), or that a neighbour has said something similar - mostly demanding sexual things. Sometimes when we are out together she will tell off a stranger for a perceived comment. It gets much much worse around when she gets her menses and she gets very very upset. I don't know what to say to her except to acknowledge that I believe she is hearing something but I don't believe that is what someone is actually saying. She simply won't accept it is voices - this happens every single evening. Does anyone have any idea what I can say to her to help her with this.
 
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apple

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Mar 28, 2014
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Hello - I am hoping someone out there can give me some tips. My daughter hears voices all the time although she insists that its not voices and that people are actually saying the things she hears - mostly its through the walls but sometimes not. What she hears is not what is being said (I can say this from experience) - it is mostly always sexual e.g., she will say the nurses who deliver her meds tell her she has to have sex with them (sometimes explicit), or that a neighbour has said something similar - mostly demanding sexual things. Sometimes when we are out together she will tell off a stranger for a perceived comment. It gets much much worse around when she gets her menses and she gets very very upset. I don't know what to say to her except to acknowledge that I believe she is hearing something but I don't believe that is what someone is actually saying. She simply won't accept it is voices - this happens every single evening. Does anyone have any idea what I can say to her to help her with this.
I'm sorry to hear about what's happening with your daughter. Hopefully someone else will be along too with their thoughts. I would say though, that I have known of one other person who experienced psychosis (which involved hearing voices) and who was prescribed antipsychotics, but later on it was established through tests that it was a hormone imbalance - and thankfully she was able to get off the antipsychotics and then was prescribed other medication.

From what you have sound, it sounds like your daughter may be experiencing something similar (although obviously I'm not a doctor), although of course there could also be psychological reasons, past or present. My personal experience of psychiatry has been that some pdoc's give strong drugs without acknowledging how detrimental the side-effects can be, and without investigating other options or offering sufficient therapeutic support which I found really undermined my recovery. Of course, if they think that you lack insight and are a danger to yourself or others they also have the power to section and make you comply with medication. Before considering contact with services, I would therefore encourage you to become as well informed as you can be and be prepared to be an advocate for your daughter. You may also find advocacy through Mind or Rethink helpful (you can ask for an Advocate to attend appointments and meetings with you), as well as Rethink's legal helpline. If you can afford it, some kind of therapeutic support may be helpful with someone your daughter feels comfortable with - there are different types - psychotherapy, art therapy, sand play therapy, or perhaps others.

You may also be interested to know that there is a Council for Evidence Based Psychiatry in the UK which highlights the problem of how those given psychiatric drugs may end up having worse outcomes.
 
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kiwozok

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Nov 11, 2014
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I should have added that my daughter is 32 and has a diagnosis of schizophrenia (started at 17). She is on clozapine and lithium and has heard voices for many years. All I want is advice on how to respond to the kinds of things she says she is hearing. What do I say when she says "the girl across the hall said I have to lick her p.....y or she will get me evicted" or "the doctors tell me I have to have sex with them and give them $10,000". She will not talk with anyone else as she does not trust anyone and she won't attend any activities or seek to understand SZ. It has always been like this. I make a point of being well informed - but no-one really seems to have the answer I need about how to respond to what the voices say when she does not agree they are voices. She hears the words come from real people (through her walls) and in the street.
 
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apple

apple

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707
All I want is advice on how to respond to the kinds of things she says she is hearing..
I appreciate that it may be difficult to know how to respond, but since you now have now clarified that this is what you want, I do not think that I can advise other than to say that when I was delusional, I found it helpful when my mother honestly said when she questioned my thoughts and disagreed with me in a non-judgemental, kind and empathetic way and explained that it was the illness, and encouraged me to focus on ordinary activities in the present.
 
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kiwozok

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Nov 11, 2014
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Thanks .. I kind of do that too but she says she is not ill so it can't be "the illness". I also try distraction where I can. Still, she tells me these terrible things "people"are saying and when I am feeling worn down it gets very hard to hear over and over - as I am certain it is for her.
 
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