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I don't have SAD but trying to understand it

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mcrome

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Joined
Apr 23, 2019
Messages
17
Location
San Francisco
I have Schizoaffective Disorder, Depressive Type, and though things get worse during the night/the holidays I never was diagnosed with SAD. But my dad was and is on medication for it. He can be really grumpy during the winter season and HATES Daylight Savings. In the summer he's much happier. I think I can understand what he's going through to some extent because I know a lot about psychology and have depression myself, but I would like to know- what is about the winter that triggers your depression? Are any of you more depressed during the spring/summer and why? I know lack of light is a big part of the equation, but I'd like to know what other factors apply.
 
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Megan333

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
52
Location
Sheffield
Definitely S A D during summer. I dont like children, so they play in gardens and the seemingly constant crying can bring on a panic attack. It just drives me crazy. I dont even know why I had kids, as I hate their selfish ways so much. It gets dark for about 6 hours, which is heaven, but blink and you miss it!
The claustrophobic,stuffy, humid, nights where you cant breath. Shows me what hell is like as it's so hot now with global warming.
Winter is heaven for me!
 
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Jrchmn

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Joined
Oct 17, 2018
Messages
53
The light thing is the easiest bit to explain. One of the hormones that triggers sleep is melatonin. If you expose someone to light it halts melatonin production. This is why light therapy for SAD needs to occur as soon as possible after waking up although during daylight savings time light therapy at sunset is helpful too. The theory is people with SAD produce more melatonin. This disrupts circadian rhythms. Modern life styles make this worse as we tend to disregard the seasons and sometimes even day and night. Disrupted circadian rhythms lead to sleeping problems, hormone problems, fatigue etc etc. Also melatonin has the same building blocks as serotonin so if you’re producing more melatonin you may lack serotonin (I think it would also decrease dopamine and possibly affect noradrenalin and adrenaline etc it’s something I’m reading up on).
My personal experience is that I feel dopey and fuzzy during times of reduced light. If there’s no stress in my life it can be quite pleasant, like the feeling you get cuddled up with a hot drink in front of a fire. With stress I feel exhausted and frustrated by my fuzzy brain. If it tips into depression it’s not always the same type of depression. I might be stressed, jittery operating on adrenaline and sleep deprived or I might be detached, remote lethargic sleeping whenever I can.
 
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Jrchmn

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Joined
Oct 17, 2018
Messages
53
On the daylight savings Scientists are fairly confident it’s shifting routines by an hour that does the damage. In winter we have GMT in summer we have GMT -1 hour. Some scientists hypothesised that -1 hour was better for us. They studied patterns from east to west across time zones to support or disprove this hypothesis but found that most patterns indicated those in the east of a time zone were better off. ( the sun rise in the east is significantly earlier than sunrise in the west of a time zone ATM sunrise in Lowestoft is 8.03 it’s not until 8.50 in Dunquin).
 
daffy

daffy

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Dec 16, 2007
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12,344
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hiding behind the sofa
I suffer with it but this year has been a complete change around . Yes I’m still getting depression but I’m diagnosed the same as you schitzoaffective depressive typ but also suffer really bad in winter with Sad. This year i decided to do something. So i bought a recommends SAD lamp and went on a high dose vitamin D 4000IU. I tried the supermarket stuff but that made no difference. Ive stopped using the lamp for now as ive had a problem with my eye. Ive been taking the lower dose since summer but only 2 months on the higher dose. I will continue taking it all year round now as I’m sure its made a difference
 
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Jrchmn

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Joined
Oct 17, 2018
Messages
53
@daffy
Really sorry to read you’ve had to stop using your light. I find if there is a huge contrast between my light and the rest of the room I get eye strain. I find units with small screens are the worst especially if they have blue light. When my light boxes go on so do a whole lot of other lights and where possible I have light colours and reflective around my lights.
 
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