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I complained

S

Starbright

Guest
Twice this last couple of weeks I've complained about TV and the way they talk about mental health

One was 'This Morning' when they were discussing soaps, they referred to one character as 'mad x' because she'd been in a psychiatric hospital, and the other time was to 'The One Show' because they said that if Ronnie Cray's schizophrenia had been diagnosed and treated then he wouldn't have been voilent.

ITV replied about 'This Morning' and said that this character had been dubbed 'mad x' in the tabloids and that is why they called her that but I think that's no excuse. No need to follow bad example.

BBC haven't replied yet but basically there is no reason to assume that a person is violent because of the mental illness. I mean, if 99% of people with a mental illness are not violent, just because 1% are, doesn't mean that the violence is connected to the illness, it might just as easily be connected to their character. It's wrong to always equate the violence with the illness. That illness doesn't mean violence.

:mad: I get so fed up with this persistent linking of violent people with schizophrenia.
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
Sickening isn't it Star. - How ignorant, uncaring & backward society is.
 
yakuza

yakuza

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Location
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Stigma

The Glasgow Media Group in Scotland analysed one month's output for national and local television, the press and magazines, including all content from factual news through to cartoons.
Altogether 570 items were found, of which 85% were non-fictional. Among all the extracts, those which reported harm to others were by far the most common (66%), followed by treatment / advice / recovery (18%), harm to self (12%), comic images (2%) and criticisms of accepted definitions of mental illness (2%).
Fictional representations were slightly different from the overall pattern, more often including comic images (16%) and less often mentioning self-harm (7%), but still paying most attention to harm to others (60%). The authors summarized by saying that 'the bulk of media content situates mental illness in a context of violence and harm ... such representations can clearly affect audiences'!
 
S

Starbright

Guest
Well yes I do think that it does affect audiences.

For Joe Public, who has no experience of mental illness, who has not had it nor has his family or friends, mental illness = a violent, dangerous, unpredictable person who might kill him.

This is down to the media - films, TV, soaps, the news, the papers, books.

It's so unfair when 99% of people are not dangerous at all in any way.

:mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad:
 
yakuza

yakuza

Well-known member
Founding Member
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Messages
812
Location
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You were quite right to complain Starbright and if you feel that Itv have not given you a satisfactory response to your complaint I would go further,and make your case to OFCOM http://www.ofcom.org.uk/complain/progs/ who will have to investigate whether this portrayal was fair and in the public interests. (y)
 
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