Hypothetical question

M

MYTIMEHASCOME

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Let's say 'person a' is a female 25 years old and she attempts to kill herself via whatever method and her intent is to end her life (she dosent take pills and then walk into a and e and disclose what she's done - she genuinely wants to end it - now let's say a passer by discovers her and calls and ambulance and takes her to hospital - and 'person a' recovers what would happen next would they allow her on her way or would she be kept in hospital against her will.

Also as an adult would her family be contacted?

Thanks x
 
P

Purple butterfly

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Hey I was person a the other night I was discharged after almost 12 hours and my parents were who found me so they already knew. I think person a needs to get and accept help offered I also hope person a is ok x
 
nonotme

nonotme

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Also as an adult would her family be contacted? Thanks x
I'm not sure here but I guess the answer would be no. if person A got sectioned there would be no need to inform anyone they didn't want informing, if its not changed family aren't always told as a matter of fact.
 
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MYTIMEHASCOME

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I'm not sure here but I guess the answer would be no. if person A got sectioned there would be no need to inform anyone they didn't want informing, if its not changed family aren't always told as a matter of fact.
Person a dosent exist - I was just wondering - I thought if somebody tried to end their life - they were deemed incapable to look after themselves and therefore a next of kin would be called - most likely a parent - but if not - happy days.
 
cpuusage

cpuusage

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Person a dosent exist - I was just wondering - I thought if somebody tried to end their life - they were deemed incapable to look after themselves and therefore a next of kin would be called - most likely a parent - but if not - happy days.
i think a lot depend on the circumstances/individual.

When i was 21 i had a severe suicide attempt & was put on a section 2 (months observation/assessment) - i was very depressed & delusional - diagnosed with psychotic depression, put on anti-psychotics & anti-depressants, & at the time had some ongoing support to be re-housed in sheltered accommodation. A friend went through similar recently.

That was the last of any kind of more proper follow up following hospitalisations - after the next 2 hospitalisations i was pretty quickly fully discharged from all services upon release.

As i say - i think a lot depends on age & overall circumstances, as well as what the assessment is of the condition/overall mental state of the individual. i think behaviour & history also plays a part, as well as how stretched local services are as well.

As a ball park i think a lot also depends on professional risk assessment. Some people get stuck in the system, on the grounds they're a serious danger/threat to themselves/others - sometimes i think understandably so - Others i think are far less of an obvious/actual threat. Some people can't get out of/away from the system, & some others can't get contact with it. i'm now in the latter group again - fully discharged from all services again for over 2 years.

i think a lot depends on overall presentation of the individual/condition/circumstances - But people in services aren't stupid either, & they have a lot of their own training & criteria - they're not going to hospitalise people on little to no basis - especially also due to lack of beds/cuts to services.
 
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MYTIMEHASCOME

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Thanks for the replies

Hi cpuusage

Do you mind me asking how old you were when you were hospitalised and also did they contact your family at all?

Thanks
 
cpuusage

cpuusage

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Thanks for the replies

Hi cpuusage

Do you mind me asking how old you were when you were hospitalised and also did they contact your family at all?

Thanks
i was sectioned at the ages of 17, 21, 25 & 26. It was family who used to primarily alert the police/services, &/or the police would be called anyway because of my behaviour - they'd place me on a section 136, i'd have an assessment by a police Doctor & be sent for a section 2 (months observation/assessment), which involved being diagnosed & medicated. One time increased to a section 3 (that initiates after-care Section 117).

The states i was in at the time of the hospitalisation were very severe/extreme - internally & also exhibiting very distressing behaviour.

i think generally someone has to be in an obviously severely unwell state, displaying obvious distress/extreme behaviour to get sectioned, in most cases. i don't think it's something done lightly. Although i think criteria varies according to area & what is being presented, in some cases.

i think a general procedure is that they will try & contact next of kin - you'd have to read up on the mental health act to see what the specific procedure is to it all -

Mental Healthcare :: Mental Health Act

Nearest relative

The law says the ‘nearest relative’ is someone’s husband, wife, civil partner or unmarried partner, if they have been living together for more than six months. If someone does not have a spouse or partner, the ‘nearest relative’ is their child, if they are over 18. If someone does not have a child, or their child is under 18, their nearest relative is then one of their parents.

If their parents are not alive, their nearest relative is the first relevant person in the following order who is aged over 18: a brother or sister; a grandparent; a grandchild; an uncle or aunt; a nephew or niece; somebody who is not related but with whom the person has been living for more than five years.

The Mental Health Act gives someone's 'nearest relative' certain powers.

A nearest relative can ask managers to admit someone to hospital compulsorily for assessment (Section 2), treatment (Section 3), or in an emergency (Section 4). This nearest relative power is rarely used: the approved mental health professional usually makes such an application to hospital managers for admission under the Act.

However, a nearest relative should be informed or consulted if mental health professionals are proposing to detain someone for treatment under the Mental Health Act unless it is not practicable to do so, or unless consultation would result in 'unreasonable delay.'

A nearest relative can also ask the hospital managers to discharge the person who has been detained (unless he or she has been detained following an order from a judge or magistrate). However, the responsible clinician can block such an application if they believe discharge is likely to result in serious risk to the patient or to other people.

People with mental health problems can apply to the County Court to change their nearest relative if they think the person named by law is unsuitable. It is also possible for an identified nearest relative to delegate their powers to another person.
 
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