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Hypersomnia (sleeping too much)

J

Jaybot95

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Apr 7, 2021
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Recently I've been going to bed around 12am and waking up at 3pm. I know it's contributing to my depression as sleep is so heavily linked to where in the cycle you're at. I want to sleep less but at the same time sleeping is my only escape from the depression of my waked state. If I wake up earlier the day feels too long and I get agitated. Anyone succeeded in breaking this cycle? I mean setting an alarm is the obvious solution but in the spur of the moment I always turn it off and go back to sleep. Do you have any motivators to get up in the morning?
 
C

CabbageMama

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Feb 7, 2021
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I am in a hypersomnia phase at the moment. Having a really tough time and I know I will absolutely lose the plot if I don’t just go with it, so I am. I am a single Parent to a 12 and a 14 year old who have just broken up for the School holidays, so am managing it differently. Going to bed earlier, getting woken up by the bloody cat at about 7am, but then able to go back to sleep for a few hours. Sometimes able to get an hour or so sleep in the afternoon. Different situation, I am sure, but I would try and get yourself to bed earlier, a good sleep hygiene routine in place. No screen time etc an hour or so before bed, all that stuff.
 
stevie_sloth

stevie_sloth

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I want to sleep less but at the same time sleeping is my only escape from the depression of my waked state. If I wake up earlier the day feels too long and I get agitated.
God YES, this is me 100%. I go to bed about 3am or 4am, and sleep / stay half asleep in bed until after 3pm. It's the only time I'm relaxed and it's an escape from the constant depression and anxiety.

I know how it feels when I have to get up "early" (before 12pm). The day just feels SO long, and I just lie on the couch, bored, depressed, and very irritable as I'm so unhappy.

I don't have anything I WANT to do or enjoy doing, so...yeah.
 
Fairy Lucretia

Fairy Lucretia

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hiya x i sleep too much ,but not as much as i used to
my beagle wakes me up for breakfast around 8am ,then she goes back to bed! which is not helpful as she used to get me up and demand i stay up
i think there has to be something worth getting up for
i used to fill time by sleeping
would you try a hobbie or new interest?
here to listen x Lu x
 
S

SFGuy

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Mar 28, 2021
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Do you have any motivators to get up in the morning?
When I'm lying in bed after the alarm goes off, I try to create a to-do list in my head and prioritize. It's another step in getting up, but it usually pushes me into waking my brain and getting out of bed.
 
C

Comorbidity

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Jul 19, 2021
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483
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London
Recently I've been going to bed around 12am and waking up at 3pm. I know it's contributing to my depression as sleep is so heavily linked to where in the cycle you're at. I want to sleep less but at the same time sleeping is my only escape from the depression of my waked state. If I wake up earlier the day feels too long and I get agitated. Anyone succeeded in breaking this cycle? I mean setting an alarm is the obvious solution but in the spur of the moment I always turn it off and go back to sleep. Do you have any motivators to get up in the morning?
Well, you've pretty much just perfectly summarised a depressive state, in my experience the type that follows a fairly lengthy heightened state, it's just how it is, it's a cycle

What I don't think enough thought or research has been dedicated to is, is given what we know of this cycle and call depression, is it an unnatural thing, or should common sense lead us to believe it is entirely natural for the subconscious brain to make the mind and body have a substantial period of downtime and rest after a prolonged period of hyperactivity, over use and unhealthy lack of proper rest?

I don't think the alleged professionals understand our so called 'disorder' all that well, I think we also have to understand it better - I've had the nothingness as I always called it, for lengthy spells after prolonged periods of hyperactivity and months of mental and physical over exertion with little rest or sleep my entire life before being diagnosed as bipolar, my higher conscious and autistic side that did always help regulate my bipolar to some degree, made the natural common sense, logistical reasoning my subconscious mind must have decided I needed to rest, and forced me to, and I had to try and ride it out as best as I could until it let be active again
 
C

CabbageMama

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Well, you've pretty much just perfectly summarised a depressive state, in my experience the type that follows a fairly lengthy heightened state, it's just how it is, it's a cycle

What I don't think enough thought or research has been dedicated to is, is given what we know of this cycle and call depression, is it an unnatural thing, or should common sense lead us to believe it is entirely natural for the subconscious brain to make the mind and body have a substantial period of downtime and rest after a prolonged period of hyperactivity, over use and unhealthy lack of proper rest?

I don't think the alleged professionals understand our so called 'disorder' all that well, I think we also have to understand it better - I've had the nothingness as I always called it, for lengthy spells after prolonged periods of hyperactivity and months of mental and physical over exertion with little rest or sleep my entire life before being diagnosed as bipolar, my higher conscious and autistic side that did always help regulate my bipolar to some degree, made the natural common sense, logistical reasoning my subconscious mind must have decided I needed to rest, and forced me to, and I had to try and ride it out as best as I could until it let be active again
This makes so much sense to me. I used to spend a lot of time fighting the urge to sleep so much when I was needing to, because I was scared I was making it worse and so desperate to do the right thing and get myself in to a healthy sleep routine of 8ish hours. The fact is, when I am like this, I DO need more sleep to function. I am as careful as I can be to get it in as routine a way as I can, so go to bed earlier to try and get it in night hours and not sleep through the day, but I know if I had less sleep at the moment, my MH would be far far poorer.
 
T

ThrivingBipolar

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Usa
@Comorbidity has a valid point. While you can't 'make up' for lost sleep in the manic episode. It is totally possible that the mania 'zapps' (like my technical term?) functions of our neurology and leaves them depleted during depression.

I am currently in my depressed/hypersomnia state and here are things I find helpful.

A) Pick a reasonable wake up time. Don't go for early right off the bat. You're waking up at 3pm? Try 1:00 pm instead. (Great tip: know how long your sleep cycle is. Most people avg 90 minutes. Many differ. Set your wake up time to be at the end if one of those cycles (Ie give yourself a full 8 cycles. That's 12 hours. Rather than try to wake up half way through a cycle. Much harder to wake up half way through)
Continue to adjust the time as you are able. But be gentle with yourself

B)when it's hard to get out of bed, sometimes it's easier just to stretch your feet!
when you notice that you are awake, stay in bed and give your feet and toes a REALLY good full stretch. You don't have to move much and this gets blood flowing through your body and to the brain before you even sit up. Which makes sitting up WAY easier. (Look up dancer feet stretches and practice a lift me during the day. Just flexing the feet and toes. Spreading them. Then pointing hard. Repeat. Good bloodflow is what your after.)

C) look into vitamins and supplements to take through your 'down' state. I increase my Vitamin D3, B complex, and fish oil when I'm depressed and I notice it's just a little easier to wake up than if I don't do that.

D) practice good sleep hygiene. No screens 30 mins before bed, have a good wind down routine, no wifi devices near the bed, etc.... I think we all know these, but it really dies help to practice the basics.

E) if you have up stages where you don't get much sleep, make it a priority to work on that. Hard to go weeks/months with no sleep and then ask the body to stop oversleeping during the down.

F) at night, make a list of VERY EASY tasks that you want to complete the next day. Things you know you can do. Some of those simple tasks that just pile up during this stage. Make a list of like 3-5 of them. One of these tasks could be taking a shower, or driving yourself to work. The next day really focus on physically checking them off the list.
This is how I give my days meaning with depression. Tiny accomplishments.


Much support to you @Jaybot95 and every one else here struggling with it. Hypersominia is effing rough
 
K

keith74

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Sep 14, 2020
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733
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Canada
or should common sense lead us to believe it is entirely natural for the subconscious brain to make the mind and body have a substantial period of downtime and rest after a prolonged period of hyperactivity, over use and unhealthy lack of proper rest?
My wife's psychiatrist has said pretty much the same thing. She simplified it as the brain needs to "rebalance itself" and that from her professional experience it is rare for someone who had an acute manic episode to not later fall into a depressive state - even if on medication.
 

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