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Twylight

Guest
If Shizophrenia is hereditary, our pre-historic ancestors must have had it

There was No sedatives or Tranquilisers - they must have been in a permanent accellerating Psychosis.

How on earth did they survive long enough to produce children ?
 
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Dollit

Guest
It depends on how far back you want to go - each era had it's way of dealing with it's troublesome population.
 
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Apotheosis

Guest
In many cases - especially in indigenous populations - we were the Shamans, the seers, highly valued & revered within the group -

Google - shamanism & schizophrenia

http://spiritualemergency.blogspot.com/2006/01/shamanism-schizophrenia.html

http://www.jungcircle.com/roberts2.html

From this site -

http://www.mentalhealthforum.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1850

http://www.mentalhealthforum.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1511

Perhaps the biggest leap for a scientist is accepting multiple truths. The important thing here is to recognize that the critique isn’t simply about neuroscience being right or wrong. It is about seeing the multiple, coinciding realities to every situation. Yes, “symptoms” may be there, but they only gain resonance when humans add meaning to them. Meeting someone with a different perception of reality can have many different interpretations. To pathologize this person as crazy is certainly one interpretation, but it is not necessarily the best, most accurate, or only “true” one. Take for instance, the experience of hearing voices. Some cultures believe that a person hearing voices is having a shamanistic experience. Indeed, this person might become a spiritual leader. Using the lens of bio-psychiatry, we could go into that other culture and spot what looks to be textbook DSM schizophrenia. On the other hand, using the lens of shamanism, we could go into a mental hospital and find a group of people in touch with the divine. Now it may seem obvious to bio-psychiatrist that all shaman are really schizophrenics, and that the cultures they live in simply haven’t been exposed to modern mental diagnostic procedures. The other way of looking at this, however, is to understand that truth is unstable and is intimately shaped by the language we use. There may be an experience that the “schizophrenic” or “shaman” has, but as human beings we can only describe that experience by imbuing it with language and subjective meaning. There is no objective acquisition of it. The meaning we choose to give it creates consequences that will affect the life of the “schizophrenic” or “shaman.” Returning to self-fulfilling prophecy theory, the person hearing voices can be made to experience each way of life through the very labeling and social reinforcement of terms like shamanism or schizophrenia. This is to say that the experience of and reaction to shamanism and schizophrenia are socially constructed.
 
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schizolanza

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It's an interesting case you put twylight.
Is schizophrenia hereditary? There is no history of it in my family.
 
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Danage

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Some might interpret schizophrenia, as Apo kind of said, to talking with the gods. If religion is false then the way that the visions, voices and other experiences can be explained is that it wasn't G-d, or the pagan gods, but it was schizophrenia or psychosis. There are other scientific ways of explaining the experiences of the prophets, such as Chariot of the Gods, but that isn't really relevant.

They are very real possibilities, but I, for one, do not believe them to be true.

As to whether mental illnesses are hereditary is open to question, but no-one in my family has ever had schizophrenia-type psychosis before, so I am the first one to have such experiences in my family.
 
bupanishad2012

bupanishad2012

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Schizophrenia

I was misdiagnosed as "schizoaffective" some time ago and put on Seroquel---until I stopped the vile medicine. Turns out I am epileptic. These folks were also considered to have strange powers, too, ergo the "divine disease" which, for one, Caesar had. I am, however, no shaman, and resent having epilepsy. Really funny how some folks interpret things in history!
 
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Danage

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I was misdiagnosed as "schizoaffective" some time ago and put on Seroquel---until I stopped the vile medicine.
That can't have been a nice experience. It's good to hear you are no longer on the medicine.

Turns out I am epileptic. These folks were also considered to have strange powers, too, ergo the "divine disease" which, for one, Caesar had. I am, however, no shaman, and resent having epilepsy. Really funny how some folks interpret things in history!
I am aware that Gaius Julius Caesar had the 'divine disease', and it was kept a secret from his men, and for good reason.
 
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Dollit

Guest
I think the question of whether any mental health problem is hereditary is pretty wide open. The likelihood of my sister developing any mental health problem as I have bipolar I is about 30%. The question is not just if there is a genetic element but was my bipolar disorder brought about largely by the environment that I was raised in. If the answer is yes then my sister is highly likely to develop a mental health problem.
 
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keepsafe

keepsafe

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My Auntie is schizophrenic and I do have depression in my family and suicides.
 
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Danage

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I think the question of whether any mental health problem is hereditary is pretty wide open. The likelihood of my sister developing any mental health problem as I have bipolar I is about 30%. The question is not just if there is a genetic element but was my bipolar disorder brought about largely by the environment that I was raised in. If the answer is yes then my sister is highly like to develop a mental health problem.
I'm more inclined to think the environment has more of a chance of affecting mental health than genetics.
 
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Dollit

Guest
I agree with you, I'm not going into details here but there's a real reason why I have the problems I have and it has little to do with my parents DNA but a lot to do with how they were raised and how they raised us.
 
keepsafe

keepsafe

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Yes there are reasons too why I am like I am and they are not hereditary reasons .

Even though there is the history in my family.
 
bupanishad2012

bupanishad2012

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Schizophrenia

I agree that mental health, generally, is about 95% environmental, and about 5% hereditary. My father, who is now 97, was the most mentally healthy person I've ever known, but alcoholism and suicide ran in his family. My wife, for that matter, was raised in the most mentally unhealthy environment possible, yet she is as stable as anyone whom I've ever known---even more than my father. If it were not for my wonderful wife of 40 years now, I would be a veritable vegetable!
 
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Twylight

Guest
I had an Aunt who was on Lithium
And I am suspicous about my Grandmother who ' Was never around'.
I tried to tackle my relatives, when I was researching the family history, but they just got really upset !!
There was an even greater stigma - in their generation
 
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Stuart Sorensen

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Ancient psychosis

David Jaynes wrote a fascinating book (now out of print I think) called "The origins of consciousness and the decline of the bicameral mind" in which he suiggested that our ancient ancestors all heard voices and that evolution has factored out voice hearing for the majority. Still a high percentage of peple hear voices and have no problems with them - look at the work of Romme & Escher among others for more on this.

Jaynes is intersting. He noted that in ancient texts - nobody is described as having an idea - they all get told things by 'the gods'. He suggests that that is psychosis - the only problem is that we define it as illness in the modern Western world.

Also David Horobin wrote a book called the madness of Adam & Eve in 2001 that suggests that psychosis (along with all human advances) are the product of changes in diet in prehistoric times resulting in increased awareness and disatisfaction (the need to improve ourselves).

Both interesting theories - both saying rather different things - but both primarily positive in their outlook. Oh yes - and neither provable because we can't go back to prehistory and do any studies.

Ho hum.

Cheers,

Stuart
 
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