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How to reach out to others about depression after a roommate tried to commit suicide?

C

cheni

New member
Joined
Nov 8, 2021
Messages
2
Location
Maine
I know this topic may look selfish, and to be honest I'm struggling writing it right now. I don't know how to explain this to be honest. To be straightforward, there was an incident where a roommate of mine tried to commit suicide at my fraternity house. There was an intervention where brothers of mine stepped in and prevented it lucklily, and afterwards he went to get some help. He's doing well, and again I feel selfish prefacing with that, but I felt I needed some backstory. For months, I have felt depressed. I don't feel the need to acknowledge why, but I have felt terrible, day after day. Last September especially my depression was probably rock-bottom, I was drinking 5-7 days of the week at the least. I think I'm doing better now but still I get jokes about how much of an alcoholic I am apparently, which probably isn't a lie. To be honest, I don't know why I wrote this, I was drunk when I first thought about this, and I still am now. I guess it just boils down to: is there a way to not feel guilty over depression after a roommate tried to commit? I'm sorry for the ramble.
 
C

cheni

New member
Joined
Nov 8, 2021
Messages
2
Location
Maine
I know this topic may look selfish, and to be honest I'm struggling writing it right now. I don't know how to explain this to be honest. To be straightforward, there was an incident where a roommate of mine tried to commit suicide at my fraternity house. There was an intervention where brothers of mine stepped in and prevented it lucklily, and afterwards he went to get some help. He's doing well, and again I feel selfish prefacing with that, but I felt I needed some backstory. For months, I have felt depressed. I don't feel the need to acknowledge why, but I have felt terrible, day after day. Last September especially my depression was probably rock-bottom, I was drinking 5-7 days of the week at the least. I think I'm doing better now but still I get jokes about how much of an alcoholic I am apparently, which probably isn't a lie. To be honest, I don't know why I wrote this, I was drunk when I first thought about this, and I still am now. I guess it just boils down to: is there a way to not feel guilty over depression after a roommate tried to commit? I'm sorry for the ramble.
I know this topic may look selfish, and to be honest I'm struggling writing it right now. I don't know how to explain this to be honest. To be straightforward, there was an incident where a roommate of mine tried to commit suicide at my fraternity house. There was an intervention where brothers of mine stepped in and prevented it lucklily, and afterwards he went to get some help. He's doing well, and again I feel selfish prefacing with that, but I felt I needed some backstory. For months, I have felt depressed. I don't feel the need to acknowledge why, but I have felt terrible, day after day. Last September especially my depression was probably rock-bottom, I was drinking 5-7 days of the week at the least. I think I'm doing better now but still I get jokes about how much of an alcoholic I am apparently, which probably isn't a lie. To be honest, I don't know why I wrote this, I was drunk when I first thought about this, and I still am now. I guess it just boils down to: is there a way to not feel guilty over depression after a roommate tried to commit? I'm sorry for the ramble.
To clarify, I don't feel that I have the right to feel depressed, due to certain circumstances. I try to battle my depression with alcohol, only to wind up with withdrawals such as shaking, although that may be due to anxiety. Regardless, I feel stuck
 
2

2Much2Feel

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 24, 2021
Messages
1,980
Location
US
I know this topic may look selfish, and to be honest I'm struggling writing it right now. I don't know how to explain this to be honest. To be straightforward, there was an incident where a roommate of mine tried to commit suicide at my fraternity house. There was an intervention where brothers of mine stepped in and prevented it lucklily, and afterwards he went to get some help. He's doing well, and again I feel selfish prefacing with that, but I felt I needed some backstory. For months, I have felt depressed. I don't feel the need to acknowledge why, but I have felt terrible, day after day. Last September especially my depression was probably rock-bottom, I was drinking 5-7 days of the week at the least. I think I'm doing better now but still I get jokes about how much of an alcoholic I am apparently, which probably isn't a lie. To be honest, I don't know why I wrote this, I was drunk when I first thought about this, and I still am now. I guess it just boils down to: is there a way to not feel guilty over depression after a roommate tried to commit? I'm sorry for the ramble.
Hey, @cheni, welcome to the forum and I'm sorry not only for your depression but for what happened with your fraternity brother. I'm trying to understand your question and I'm not sure that I do. So you feel guilty for thinking of asking for help/needing some help because you feel the "attention' should be going to the brother who attempted suicide rather than you? Do you feel that you don't deserve help because yours somehow doesn't appear as severe?

I can say that anyone and everyone who cares about you--your family, friends, brothers--would rather you get some help before reaching that point. That act is so painful to those who love you and care about you. They don't want you to have to get to that point.

I'm so happy your brother was able to be stopped and get help, and in doing so, he has opened the door to you more in a way. You aren't "stealing his thunder". You can maybe look at coming forward for help as a nod of respect to him, maybe tell him he gave you the courage to come forward, show him you don't think of it as something to be ashamed of either. You will actually be supporting him more than "selfishly" (as you put it) getting some attention for your needs. And you will be opening the door for the next guy who may feel ashamed or embarrassed about admitting he needs some help.

Really glad you reached out and I hope you can see that your life is worth it. Let us know how it goes if you can. xx
 
M

Mistral

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2011
Messages
782
Get your drinking problem needs to be dealt with head on in my view. Are there any resouces that can access for this?
 
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