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How it feels to be diagnosed with autism later in life

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firemonkee57

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#1
Posted by Michael Richards March 7 2018

“He is wired differently to you and me, this child of mine. He doesn’t like loud noises, or dark spaces, or strangers touching his head”. These are the first lines from a poem a mother penned about her son 11-year-old son who has Asperger’s syndrome.

Sophie Billington goes on to explain how her son Tristan’s brain works differently: “He can see in an instant the pattern, the layout, the solution to a puzzle”, but that “the world judges” and “sees only the outbursts and over-reactions”. It seems the poem struck a chord – going viral after being posted on Facebook.

Although autism is predominantly diagnosed in childhood, increasing numbers of adults are finding out that they too have autism.


How it feels to be diagnosed with autism later in life


I think quite a few here can probably identify with this.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#2
you and your autism, when i changed seats on the intercity and a women worker challenged me for not sitting in my reserved seat i said i had an autism spectrum diagnosis and needed to get away from the guy talking into his mobile

much better than saying schitzoprenia, didn't get the evil eye all the journey
 
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firemonkee57

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#3
Rambo, autistic traits are a part of who I am , or should I just post what you approve of?
 
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exyz

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Thanks for the link FM, it was a good article.
I'm so sorry that you did not get the support when you were young and realise that it has very much affected your way of life.
Clearly, there is a long way to go before people actually understand, :hug1:
 
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ramboghettouk

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Rambo, autistic traits are a part of who I am , or should I just post what you approve of?
for all you know autism may apply to me, i sometimes wonder about aspergers which wasn't around in the 70s, what worries me is your wanting to be rediagnosed, still remember the victim support coming round as i'd mentioned schitzoprenia the women had a con accompany her, i hearrd them talking in the car park as they were leaving the women was on about how my flat smelled, and someone should hear about this, the cpn said they sais he wasn't schitzoprenic and it's caught up with them

my cpn, a different one, i had said she had letters from 3 psychiatrists saying i wasn't schitzoprenic and used that as an excuse to close my case since i don't know how many have said i am

firemonkey theres an old saying beware that your wishes become true
 
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ramboghettouk

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firemonkey you've moved to a new area no one knows you you've got no professional who knows you to represent you, they're looking for an excuse to leave you, then you say your autistic not schitzoprenic, how many autistic people do you see at mental health services
 
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ramboghettouk

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#8
claude

claude

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anecdotally, i have a friend who was diagnosed with autism as an adult after many years with cmhts and so far it has not had a big impact on the treatment she has received, she still is also diagnosed with bipolar, but it is has been very good for her in terms of understanding her self and her needs. It has helped to show a pattern of the stress of changing routine causing psychosis and mania for her. I think the drive to want to know answers about ourselves is very understandable and can be helpful in finding how to live our best lives
 
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ramboghettouk

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anecdotally i've met autistic people on benefit demos who have been having benefit problems, as i said to one that diagnosis wasn't used when i was first diagnosed i wonder

i also am aware of the stigma attached to a schitzo diagnosis and can see the attraction of an autism diagnosis

theres a women on this web site diagnosed aspergers whose having serious benefit problems
 
DoctorInternet2

DoctorInternet2

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What's the difference between autism and aspergers? I definitely don't like sitting next to people on their mobiles, or people eating crisps or crying children. I have to move away, and when their is a loud sound on the tube I have to put my fingers in my ears. Is that a sign of it?
 
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ramboghettouk

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#12
whats the difference between autism aspergers and schitzoprenia when i was young in the 70s everyone brought in had schitzoprenia or manic depression, there might be a few depressives
 
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AvrilE

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#13
Autism in later life

Hello

I have recently been diagnosed with Autism and dyspraxia at the grand old age of 62.

Also, suffering this week after finally coming off meds after 23 years.

Any others recently diagnosed with similar conditions who can relate, please? I live in Manchester, UK

Hugs

Avril
 
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firemonkee57

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#15
If damn incompetent health professionals could be bothered to do their jobs properly then so many of us, especially from older generations, wouldn't have to self diagnosis .
It 's a bit fucking rich when health professionals can't be bothered to do a good job of finding out how you tick and how things affect you , but still think it their right to pass judgement on you . If people were being lined up to be shot these professionals should be the first against the wall.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#16
one thing that worrys me is theres some diagnosis more stigmatising than schitzoprenia as far as getting help, hanging round me neck i haven't heard of
 
Per Ardua Ad Astra

Per Ardua Ad Astra

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#17
It's a bum rap, that's for sure. The service-staffers have fuck all right to cock a snoop at us, and pass judgement. Fuck all right :)
 
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Pejay

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#18
I don't know about you, but a diagnosis is only attractive if it helps to explain. Mental Health problems are so frightening, and isolating, finding others with similar problems is essential, and sometimes that cannot happen without some sort of label that makes sense to guide you to the right people. It is very clear that a lot of people who have asd have been misdiagnosed both as having and not having mental health problems.

I went through hell with a Personality Disorder diagnosis because the services could see that I was different but didn't know enough about ASD to recognise it. I also went through hell because they did not believe I was having hallucinations. Even now the Dr wavers as to whether it is psychosis or not. The paper Ram linked says that we don't answer quetions the same way as neurotypicals so our symptoms are masked or distorted as a result.

They wouldn't let me have an ASD assessment for years - but finally at the tender age of 53 I was diagnosed. Finally things are making sense - but also sadness that there are things about myself that I won't be able to change.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#19
i maybe autism or aspergers but where does that get me, if my claim for esa or pip has a gps reply of aspergers i'd be concerned what the clark would make of it, probably a cut

and i'd still be mainly unfit for work, with an unemployment history it's practically impossible to explain and maybe i'd also fail a crb check due to teling some police bigot i was schitzoprenic, the psychiatrist said why did you tell the police you were schitzoprenic when i say your not, i said they asked me what the drugs were for and thats what it says on the box

i have been rediagnosed caused me immense hardship, glad when i got the old schitzo diagnosis back, as it is they've closed my case
 
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Pejay

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#20
Hi, diagnosis appears to me to be pretty inexact. The DWP, if you're in the UK, don't work on diagnosis, they work on how your disability affects you and score against that. Perhaps you can see if there is a benefits adviser in your area who could help you with the forms?

Have you asked for an ASD assessment? Not everywhere does adult assessments, my assessment for dyspraxia had to come through Individual Patient Commissioning.

Because its a spectrum some people with ASD are fit for work. In fact they excel in some jobs - particularly those that don't depend on sophisticated relationship skills.

I tried to work so I have dismissal letters from employers explaining why I'm not fit for work. However I do really want to get back to work if I can find an employer willing to work around my problems.

The DWP didn't even give me a face to face assessment at the outset and said I scored zero. I appealed and had to face a panel. I was so freaked out that they did not take long to decide I met the criteria. It is a horrible system.

Hope you can negotiate with you Dr to get what you need, yours Pejay