how ill am i some thoughts

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ramboghettouk

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#1
i'm ill emough that the majority of women avoid me, i'm ill enough that when i work i'm considered unfit due to illness.

whether i meet the benefit systems definition of illness, how many do?

I am getting a certain level of benefits on grounds of illness, i'm not on job seekers allowance, i'm also housed in social housing for which a big criteria is illness

i was told i was stabilised on meds, if i came off meds i'd meet illness criteria in spades

one of the things that annoy me is having people who get more than me in sickness benefits telling me that i'm illler than them, one tells me it' that i'm too ill to use the system
 
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ramboghettouk

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#3
i got turned down for a blue badge, that allows free parking in britain on the grounds i can walk, my area you have to pay to park, it doesn't help the isolation that anyone who visits me doing a great favour has to pay for the privelege, a blue badge i could give them to put behind the windscreen
 
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ramboghettouk

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#4
my friend who tells me i'm iller than him whilst getting 3 work sick pensions, he was driving me to my new flat to put up shelves, we stopped by this cafe were i said i'd buy brealfast, he had a blue badge, some parking warden was watching as we got out the car, when we got back to the car my friend started swearing there was a parking penalty notice on it
 
Tired Daisy

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#5
i got turned down for a blue badge, that allows free parking in britain on the grounds i can walk, my area you have to pay to park, it doesn't help the isolation that anyone who visits me doing a great favour has to pay for the privelege, a blue badge i could give them to put behind the windscreen
Cant you make one on a computer then stick that behind there windshield?
 
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ramboghettouk

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#6
Cant you make one on a computer then stick that behind there windshield?
don't have the skills and maybe parking wardens check with a database, there would still be what to do if they got a ticket
 
fazza

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#7
Unfortunately Rambo a lot of mental illnesses are part of a spectrum. Some people's schizophrenia affects them differently (worse perhaps) than others.

With physical health problems that's also tough as how do we know who's disability is worse than others.

All I know is that I am ill. A couple of months ago I was fine (perhaps no insight to how Ill I was but we are all in it together.

As for not attracting the ladies. It's not your illness, it could be your after shave lol.

The right partner is out there for you.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#8
last psychiatrist said i should be grateful i'm functioning on a high level for my illness then came the benefit reforms and worrys that high functioning will be held against me, i didn't hear that psychiatrist saying fit for work
 
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Tabby 88

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#9
Same confusion here. I don't think any knows, not psychiatrists or gp's or anyone. I hated other claimants telling me they were more ill than i was so why was i getting more money than them. I got sick of what is your illness, medication, benefit amount. All they talk about.

No point in me being off work as nothing to do. I am at home every day, no more groups, no more college course discounts because i am not a job seeker so not entitled to any of those courses. I don't get anything, any help, any discount anywhere. How am i supposed to get ready for work? I have no life. Used to have drop-in, mhproject, ymca, salvation army art classes, lots of things, now nothing.

No psychiatrist although he last said that the people who didn't have to work were the lucky ones. He means the people who are married and husbands support them, or are on sick pension. He said many patients of mine are having to take more medication and be sedated through benefit assessments. Does he class me as someone who should be off work? Don't know. Nurse said do some knitting, not volunteering. Another says volunteer, another asks if i will go back to work, another asks when i will be able to. I say i have bipolar, it comes and goes, have no control over that meds or not, nurse said yes that is true. I had to remind the nurse of my illness, comes and goes. They have no clue or they forget important points.

Meds impair ability to work and to live. I am also functioning but with family support. Can i work? a bit, but not enough to support myself. I would rapidly look like a tramp and pass out from poor diet. I don't want that to be the case.

Hate how we are always having to ask ourselves are we ill enough. I never used to even think about it, just got up and though what can i do today?
 
Tired Daisy

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#10
a no of people with psychosis do kill themselves
Its no wonder... I wanted to die when I was having urges to harm my eyes, of course I didn't want to harm my eyes but it was psychotic depression from where I've been depressed for a long time and just got used to it then it developed into psychotic depression and something I couldn't control it was like a chemical reaction in my brain was happening and building up and no I don't take drugs. Anyway I didn't wanna go blind and the voices didn't help either telling to do it.

Anyway I held back and started taking Prozac which I had in the cupboard and that took the edge of it.

Its a horrible feeling like living a real nightmare I just wanted to die.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#11
i as i say was told that as long as i take the meds i was stabilised on meds and didn't have an illness
 
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Tabby 88

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#12
There are always some symptoms left that medication doesn't remove no? Insomnia/hypersomnia, lethary or restlessness,

The side effects of medication

Anxiety from losing confidence having been off work

The distress of bad memories of past episodes and appointments that go over in your mind, what was said to you

Finding it hard to get help to get your life back together. That service no longer available

Anxiety over being forced to do something you feel unable to do. Fear that if pushed, could cause a relapse or suicide.

Difficulties with keeping clean, running household, eating well, caused by medication

Hopelessness over situation and lost years and opportunities

I could go on, and a decent nurse or psychairtsit or gp would understand this, unless they are about 20 years old.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#13
There are always some symptoms left that medication doesn't remove no? Insomnia/hypersomnia, lethary or restlessness,

The side effects of medication

Anxiety from losing confidence having been off work

The distress of bad memories of past episodes and appointments that go over in your mind, what was said to you

Finding it hard to get help to get your life back together. That service no longer available

Anxiety over being forced to do something you feel unable to do. Fear that if pushed, could cause a relapse or suicide.

Difficulties with keeping clean, running household, eating well, caused by medication

Hopelessness over situation and lost years and opportunities

I could go on, and a decent nurse or psychairtsit or gp would understand this, unless they are about 20 years old.
the average nurse or psychiatrist are trained to see things through a medical lense they don't understand, to me it's intentianal and part of a mental health system that doesn't care and is into control and containment
 
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Tabby 88

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#14
The psychiactric nurse i saw at dwp assessment was about 40-45 years old and he spoke of the above to me. I did have to start the conversation though.

I thought the above would be helpful to you to see that it is more complicated that ill or not ill. It is about recovery not cure. Relapses happen whether the team see them or not. Most of us are discharged now and are trying to manage with gp assistance. Gp's are overworked so we are managing ourselves and if lucky, help from family and friends. Forums also. Hospital beds less available and briefer and not nice either as full of 6 month stayers that are at time frightening.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#15
a psychiatric nurse working for the dwp will put a different spin on things than someone working for mental health services it's a different job with different requirements for holding it down
 
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Tabby 88

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#16
a psychiatric nurse working for the dwp will put a different spin on things than someone working for mental health services it's a different job with different requirements for holding it down
But either way, it was validating that a cpn, wherever he works, acknowledged the above difficulties in addition to illness. He should be saying i am fit for work, but he accepted my point, and added more of his own.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#17
But either way, it was validating that a cpn, wherever he works, acknowledged the above difficulties in addition to illness. He should be saying i am fit for work, but he accepted my point, and added more of his own.
it was validating but i still think he'd be less likely to do that if he was working for mental health services directly

he should be saying your fit for work what if your benefits are cut and your unable to find a job that could support you, my issue
 
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Tabby 88

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#18
it was validating but i still think he'd be less likely to do that if he was working for mental health services directly

he should be saying your fit for work what if your benefits are cut and your unable to find a job that could support you, my issue
My issue also. I would not be able to fully support myself, just partly, some of the time. I don't think the doctors and cpn's quite understand that. This one was on the right track but didn't fully understand. I don't like having to be the one to tell them like it is for many of us.

If at mdt i don't know how it works. They say in recovery or remission, and that that is only a % reduction in symptoms, or stable on medication, or. I don't understand the line but when they say in remission, they don't mean well and ready to go back to work. This is a friend's ex-cpn husband. He says recovery is a % reduction, not all well and great and ready to hit the world of work. He says there is no such this as back to normal. No such thing as cured. Cured is all he talked about, how wrong that word is with mental health.

A psychiatrist friend of a friend that i have not met, said he felt very sorry for the people who had to work now and who did not have spouse to support them financially or for people without sick pension. He did not think we were all able to work and was not happy we have to go through assessments and be sedated for the duration. The new generation of psychiatrists, who knows what their opinions will be.
 
Jbb79

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#19
I Got a disability pension almost, sort of, against my Will x x I Was on normal unemployment terms, and I was happy - - Poor, Yet, happy - I Wanted to be, A monk x xx

Not a saint, Just - - A monk x xx

Templar 32.jpg

After Three meetings, with Doctors, Trying to get me To take Benefits ( Pensions); I Finally said Yes, More Money Could be Nice <3 <3

I Regret it, To-day - - Was Happier, Being poor <3<3 <3