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  • Safety Notice: This section on Psychiatric Drugs/Medications enables people to share their personal experiences of using such drugs/medications. Always seek the advice of your doctor, psychiatrist or other qualified health professional before making any changes to your medications or with any questions you may have regarding drugs/medications. In considering coming off psychiatric drugs it is very important that you are aware that most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should only be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision.

Help luck along to find psychiatric medicines

F

firemonkee57

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2009
Messages
8,224
Where will new psychiatric medicines come from? That there is a crisis in the drug-discovery pipeline for mental health is well known. Many pharmaceutical companies have given up on this realm, and a research director from one such firm has said that any business working in this field itself needs psychiatric help.


Scientists continue to search for the molecular and neurological clues that could allow informed development of new treatments, but it seems likely that, for now at least, we will have to rely on luck.

Serendipity is not be sniffed at. The antibiotic minocycline has emerged as a possible schizophrenia treatment after two Japanese people given it for infection saw remarkable improvement in their psychotic symptoms. The blood-clotting drug warfarin may also be useful in schizophrenia: in an audit of clinical work, a US haematology group found that the drug seems to relieve symptoms. There may be many explanations for these observations, and trials are required for confirmation. But if mechanisms can be determined, they could open useful avenues for schizophrenia research.

For depression, clinically relevant observations have been made by neuroscientists exploring brain function. Studies that used ketamine to model psychosis in normal volunteers found that the drug induced rapid improvement in mood. This led to clinical trials that proved its efficacy against depression. Psilocybin, the active psychedelic ingredient of magic mushrooms, has been used to study altered states of consciousness in healthy people, in whom it triggered long-lasting improvements in mood. This, coupled with effects on the subgenual cingulate cortex, an important brain region for depression, has led to a trial on treatment-resistant depression that will start in 2015, funded by the UK Medical Research Council.

Such accidental discoveries are not new: it can be argued that all the commonly used classes of psychiatric drugs have been arrived at through serendipity. The calming effects of the benzodiazepines and lithium were found accidentally in animal studies, and antidepressants and antipsychotics were discovered from unexpected beneficial psychological effects in humans. Early classes of antidepressants were originally developed as anti-tuberculosis and antipsychotic drugs. The mood of patients improved even though the underlying disorder did not. The first antipsychotic, chlorpromazine, showed anti-schizophrenia effects when used as a sedative.

On the basis of such insights, many other agents have been synthesized and tested. Often, these treatments are effective and carry fewer side effects than the original compounds. But they are all ‘me too’ drugs, based on the same mechanisms of action. So they do not advance knowledge of the neuro*science of antidepressants or antipsychotics, at least in terms of new molecular targets.

“Commonly used medicines are considered safe, so trials for psychiatric benefits could be fast-tracked.”

Every day, billions of people take medicines. Some of these drugs may have unexpected effects on symptoms of brain disorders, but at present there is no way to collect this information. If we are to rely on serendipity to bring us new drugs, how can we increase the chances of success?

Most Western nations already collect information on adverse effects. We should establish parallel schemes to report psychiatric benefits. Trials could be especially useful in countries such as Denmark and Sweden, which have existing databases for medicine use and for mental health. Commonly used medicines are considered safe, so trials for psychiatric benefits could be fast-tracked.

Patient-led approaches are also possible. Online forums allow people to discuss their experiences of antipsychotic and antidepressant medications. Such sites may have millions of visitors per month and would be ideal hosts for large-scale public questionnaires, or web pages dedicated to reporting positive influences of prescription and over-the-counter medicines.

Help luck along to find psychiatric medicines : Nature News & Comment
 
BillFish

BillFish

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 12, 2009
Messages
2,388
Where will new psychiatric medicines come from? That there is a crisis in the drug-discovery pipeline for mental health is well known. Many pharmaceutical companies have given up on this realm, and a research director from one such firm has said that any business working in this field itself needs psychiatric help.


Scientists continue to search for the molecular and neurological clues that could allow informed development of new treatments, but it seems likely that, for now at least, we will have to rely on luck.

Serendipity is not be sniffed at. The antibiotic minocycline has emerged as a possible schizophrenia treatment after two Japanese people given it for infection saw remarkable improvement in their psychotic symptoms. The blood-clotting drug warfarin may also be useful in schizophrenia: in an audit of clinical work, a US haematology group found that the drug seems to relieve symptoms. There may be many explanations for these observations, and trials are required for confirmation. But if mechanisms can be determined, they could open useful avenues for schizophrenia research.

For depression, clinically relevant observations have been made by neuroscientists exploring brain function. Studies that used ketamine to model psychosis in normal volunteers found that the drug induced rapid improvement in mood. This led to clinical trials that proved its efficacy against depression. Psilocybin, the active psychedelic ingredient of magic mushrooms, has been used to study altered states of consciousness in healthy people, in whom it triggered long-lasting improvements in mood. This, coupled with effects on the subgenual cingulate cortex, an important brain region for depression, has led to a trial on treatment-resistant depression that will start in 2015, funded by the UK Medical Research Council.

Such accidental discoveries are not new: it can be argued that all the commonly used classes of psychiatric drugs have been arrived at through serendipity. The calming effects of the benzodiazepines and lithium were found accidentally in animal studies, and antidepressants and antipsychotics were discovered from unexpected beneficial psychological effects in humans. Early classes of antidepressants were originally developed as anti-tuberculosis and antipsychotic drugs. The mood of patients improved even though the underlying disorder did not. The first antipsychotic, chlorpromazine, showed anti-schizophrenia effects when used as a sedative.

On the basis of such insights, many other agents have been synthesized and tested. Often, these treatments are effective and carry fewer side effects than the original compounds. But they are all ‘me too’ drugs, based on the same mechanisms of action. So they do not advance knowledge of the neuro*science of antidepressants or antipsychotics, at least in terms of new molecular targets.

“Commonly used medicines are considered safe, so trials for psychiatric benefits could be fast-tracked.”

Every day, billions of people take medicines. Some of these drugs may have unexpected effects on symptoms of brain disorders, but at present there is no way to collect this information. If we are to rely on serendipity to bring us new drugs, how can we increase the chances of success?

Most Western nations already collect information on adverse effects. We should establish parallel schemes to report psychiatric benefits. Trials could be especially useful in countries such as Denmark and Sweden, which have existing databases for medicine use and for mental health. Commonly used medicines are considered safe, so trials for psychiatric benefits could be fast-tracked.

Patient-led approaches are also possible. Online forums allow people to discuss their experiences of antipsychotic and antidepressant medications. Such sites may have millions of visitors per month and would be ideal hosts for large-scale public questionnaires, or web pages dedicated to reporting positive influences of prescription and over-the-counter medicines.

Help luck along to find psychiatric medicines : Nature News & Comment
I think research Knowledge is increasing at an exponential rate in all fields, and I remain hopeful of better treatments, although I would never consider becoming a guinea-pig for trials myself though, I guess that's up to the brave, desperate, or very poor.
 
M

Mastiff mom

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 22, 2014
Messages
1,157
Location
Washington,DC
Here in the US they are doing research on Ketamine at theNational Institute of Health. I've been on practically every drug avaiable for bipolar two-- at this point I mainly experience mixed state which is very dangerous for me as I become highly agitated and suicidally depressed. The impulsivity in that state makes it all the more dangerous. I am very interested in new medications and appreciate your post.
 
coldwater00

coldwater00

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
3,372
Location
Yorkshire
I would never be a guinea pig either. There are times that I've wished deeply that treatments were better and with less/no severely disabling side effects. For example if they could create an "antipsychotic" that didn't cause weight gain (and I know all of them do, despite some doctors telling you otherwise - e.g Aripiprazole, Ziprasidone, and Asenapine "are weight neutral" is bollocks) it would be massive progress. At least then, people wouldn't have to worry about their body/body image being destroyed along with everything else.
 
A

Anna8Jackson

New member
Joined
Nov 10, 2014
Messages
4
Hi,
Many online pharmacies are also providing generic medicines for mental health and well being. These drugs provide an affordable solution for those who can't afford the over expensive brand drugs. However, it is necessary to do a complete background check of the source before ordering any medications online. I bought some generic medicines from meds247online last month. My experience was good. Try your luck..
 
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