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Hearing internal voices when I'm about asleep.

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Rider52

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Joined
Dec 2, 2019
Messages
325
Location
USA
I honestly don't know what to do about this. I hear voices when I'm about asleep. I also get really vivid dreams. I feel anxious and concerned about this. This has been going on for awhile. I heard they could be hypnagogic hallucinations. But why aren't these symptoms going away? I had a psych assessment several months ago and I was told it's normal. Something just doesn't seem right. I may go for a second opinion.
 
Marrex

Marrex

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Feb 17, 2021
Messages
193
Location
Oklahoma City
Do you think it could be sleep paralysis? Here's a brief summary:

"Sleep paralysis is a condition identified by a brief loss of muscle control, known as astonia, that happens just after falling asleep or waking up. In addition to atonia, people often have hallucinations during episodes of sleep paralysis.

Sleep paralysis is categorized as a type of parasomnia. Parasomnias are abnormal behaviors during sleep. Because it is connected to the rapid eye movement (REM) stage of the sleep cycle, sleep paralysis is considered to be a REM parasomnia.

Standard REM sleep involves vivid dreaming as well as atonia, which helps prevent acting out dreams. However, under normal circumstances, atonia ends upon waking up, so a person never becomes conscious of this inability to move.

As a result, researchers believe that sleep paralysis involves a mixed state of consciousness that blends both wakefulness and REM sleep. In effect, the atonia and mental imagery of REM sleep seems to persist even into a state of being aware and awake."
 
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Rider52

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 2, 2019
Messages
325
Location
USA
Do you think it could be sleep paralysis? Here's a brief summary:

"Sleep paralysis is a condition identified by a brief loss of muscle control, known as astonia, that happens just after falling asleep or waking up. In addition to atonia, people often have hallucinations during episodes of sleep paralysis.

Sleep paralysis is categorized as a type of parasomnia. Parasomnias are abnormal behaviors during sleep. Because it is connected to the rapid eye movement (REM) stage of the sleep cycle, sleep paralysis is considered to be a REM parasomnia.

Standard REM sleep involves vivid dreaming as well as atonia, which helps prevent acting out dreams. However, under normal circumstances, atonia ends upon waking up, so a person never becomes conscious of this inability to move.

As a result, researchers believe that sleep paralysis involves a mixed state of consciousness that blends both wakefulness and REM sleep. In effect, the atonia and mental imagery of REM sleep seems to persist even into a state of being aware and awake."
It could be something like that. I just feel really anxious when this happens. I should make another doctors appointment to see what's going on.
 
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Orangeade

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Joined
Dec 23, 2021
Messages
1,686
Location
England
It could be something like that. I just feel really anxious when this happens. I should make another doctors appointment to see what's going on.
Wishing you the best of luck with your doctors appointment. Sending love x
 
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BlueWater

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Jul 29, 2021
Messages
877
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Earth
I've had hypnagogic hallucinations when very stressed. Usually, an hour or two into sleep I've awakened to the sound of people and other noises in my house as well as to visuals and to tactile sensations. I've also had these hallucinations just as I'm falling asleep. They can be scary, but they are common. If you're having more of them, then tell your doctor and consider asking for anxiety meds. Also, tell yourself as the event is happening that it isn't real. Once I got a beta blocker to take at bedtime, all of my physical anxiety and hypnagogic hallucinations vanished.
 
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BlueWater

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Jul 29, 2021
Messages
877
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Earth
Something you can do is talk back to yourself as the hallucination is happening. Tell yourself this isn't real. I told myself one night after awakening to sounds, "There aren't any f-ing ghosts in this house so go back to sleep." I went back to sleep. The most recent tactile hallucination was on a higher level of horror and trying to soothe myself didn't work. But try whatever words could work for you. Benzos, beta blockers or a low dose of an anti-depressant that helps people sleep could help you. I've had these hallucinations since childhood, even in the daytime and they always correspond to stress for me.
 
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Scott N

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Joined
Jan 8, 2022
Messages
12
Location
California
@Rider52 Hello Rider! My personal experience with this happened in my late 20's. I had to sleep sitting up in bed with my back against the wall. I felt that I could have something wrong with my heart or, was experiencing a shortness of breath. Just as I would begin to fall asleep, I would sit up gasping for air not knowing what just happened.
I went to a Dr. for a checkup. He suggested that they connect a monitor to me, sensors stuck to various parts of my upper torso. A box was attached to record my heart beat among other things. Every time that I experienced what I was trying to describe to them, I was to push a button on the box which was meant to mark a spot on the recording that they could check later. After one week of doing this, I turned the box in to the doctor and wait for the results. I thought that I did pretty well, there were plenty of times that I was able to press the button and timestamp the event. I was pretty confident that they would be able to identify the problem.

Two weeks later I went in to get the results. No heart trouble at all! I felt a little frustrated that they weren't able to tell me what the problem was. He then asked me about my living environment. I was in my late 20's, still living with my father and also working with him and his wife at the time.

My problem was due to stress and feeling trapped. I would hear my father and wife arguing through the wall at night. Also felt that I should be doing something for myself. Forging my own path in life.

My problem was solvable, not a physical or mental condition or disease. It did become one, as I did not get help until I had to. Life changes are often the most difficult and we wish for a diagnosis so that we can simply take a medicine to help us. Well, that's my experience and what your post reminded me of.
You may be able to save yourself decades of waiting for doctors to find the answer and the right combination of medications or, you may be able to look at what is going on in your life that is identifiable and find support.
Peace!
 
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