Has someone been through similar struggles?

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Mexis

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For at least the last 15 of my 22 years alive I've constantly suffered from devastating fatigue, extreme brain fog, near-complete physical numbness, complete emotional numbness, dissociation, derealisation, depersonalisation, tingling sensations, random small transparent shaking visual spots that give a false sensation of objects moving, acid reflux, anxiety-altered perception, tension headaches, stuck thoughts, inability to sleep, and constipation. I feel like a constant empty void sleep-walking through life but removed from reality. I have no idea what may have brought on this condition. For many of these years I've falsely hoped that the condition would eventually go away because the symptoms have varied in intensity, but I've since realised that this is not going to happen. I feel so lonely in my situation because my parents disbelieve me and healthcare has so far dismissed my concerns as depression or an obsessive focus on physical sensations because of my ASD. Blood tests have not shown anything out of the ordinary. This is frustrating. With this condition, the fatigue in particular, I will not be able to finish my academic studies and I will not be able to hold down a job. My intent is to seek medical attention again when I've flown back to Stockholm after this summer because I don't really have a thorough medical history there and can thus 'start over' again with medical contact and examination. Has someone been in a similar situation?
 
blacksmoke

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yeah i have in the past to the point i was a hazard in the work place. i did go to an allergy screening place and was told i had got candida and went on a detox diet for 6 months.

ever since then i have always well mostly, been careful what i eat as i dont want to go through that again.

in my case it was the work enviroment that set this off but mostly its to do with what you eat and the more you eat what i call fiddled with food the higher the chance of having chronic fatique
 
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Turnitoffandonagain

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Not exactly the same list but not a million miles away. Have had a steadily-increasing list of distinctive but apparently undiagnosable symptoms accumulating for over 30 years now. Every 5 or 10 years another symptom appears and becomes permanent. Every time I learn to live with one, another one appears. Am pretty much constantly in pain from multiple sources.

Have largely given up on the medical profession. And after decades of dealing with psychiatrists/psychologists have started to feel jaded to the point of hostility towards them. I am not convinced they really know anything at all (medics know some things, but not as much as they seem to imagine they do).
 
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Turnitoffandonagain

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I always end up being offered anti-depressants. Especially SSRIs, which seem to be the new cure-all snake-oil. At this point I've had every SSRI there is, plus metazapine and a couple of tricyclics and an SNRI. None of them did anything about the physical symptoms they were supposedly prescribed for, nor did they even improve my mood.

Some gave me horrible side-effects, most did almost nothing beyond making me slightly emotionally-numb (still felt physically very ill, wanted to emotionally slump in response, but instead just felt suspended emotionally in mid-air, is how I would describe it).

I might have psyche-issues, I know I do, but I have always coped with those, but the contant accumulation of disabling physical symptoms has just defeated me.

Now the fashionable cure-all for every ill seems to be CBT, which I've had before but didn't get on with. Supposed to be starting it again, but the therapist doesn't seem to like my negative attitude. That seems lacking in empathy on her part - what should you expect after 30 years of getting nowhere with therapists? Of course I'm going to be jaded and cyncial about it. What kind of therapy requires you to be perfectly well-adjusted before you can be treated?

Sorry am hijacking someone else's thread. Feel weirdly self-concious about starting a thread of my own. And it _is_ a somewhat similar thing - unexplained physical symptoms. Some overlap with Mexis's list.

I really think the medical profession overestimate how much they know. Just look at the history of it - at all points in history there have been multiple conditions that have gone undiagnosed, why assume that _now_ doctors know everything?
 
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Turnitoffandonagain

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To me it's as if someone has been sticking pins in a voodoo doll of me (note: I don't literally believe this to be the case!). Or if I'm in a Matrix-like simulation and some mad scientist keeps messing with the program as an experiment to see how I'll react to yet another horrible bodily-dysfunction with no explanation (that one actually seems marginally more plausible).

Or it's like being constantly tortured by an invisible torturer while everyone else tells you they can't see him so he can't exist.

It makes me alternate between anger and despondency. The memory of how good life can be when you are physically functional adds to the torture of it.

The "brief CBT" approach, which seems to be what someone in the NHS has decided is _the_ treatment for CFS and concequently for all medically-unexplained-symptoms, appears to be that it's a cycle kept going by your own 'bad thoughts'. I am utterly unconvinced by this, it in no way matches my experience or the onset of my symptoms. But no disagreement with the One True Faith of CBT is allowed, apparently. It's like faith-healing, it seems, if you don't believe sufficiently it won't work.
 
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Mexis

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To me it's as if someone has been sticking pins in a voodoo doll of me (note: I don't literally believe this to be the case!). Or if I'm in a Matrix-like simulation and some mad scientist keeps messing with the program as an experiment to see how I'll react to yet another horrible bodily-dysfunction with no explanation (that one actually seems marginally more plausible).

Or it's like being constantly tortured by an invisible torturer while everyone else tells you they can't see him so he can't exist.

It makes me alternate between anger and despondency. The memory of how good life can be when you are physically functional adds to the torture of it.

The "brief CBT" approach, which seems to be what someone in the NHS has decided is _the_ treatment for CFS and concequently for all medically-unexplained-symptoms, appears to be that it's a cycle kept going by your own 'bad thoughts'. I am utterly unconvinced by this, it in no way matches my experience or the onset of my symptoms. But no disagreement with the One True Faith of CBT is allowed, apparently. It's like faith-healing, it seems, if you don't believe sufficiently it won't work.
Your descriptions perfectly match how I feel. Occasionally I get bursts of painful headache attacks or muscle cramps where I feel tightly strapped to a magnet. It's like being on that awful roller-coaster and just praying it will end as soon as possible. The symptoms come and go in intensity, and while they generally decrease in intensity over time, I know they can eventually blow up again.
 
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