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Has Diazepam helped your Agoraphobia?

ShutIn

ShutIn

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Dec 31, 2018
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I've had Agoraphobia on/off since 2006..my worst period being 7 years without leaving house..I've gotten better on and off over the years..but now im at a bad place again ..which i never thought i could get in again..ugh....has anyone had any luck with Diazepam? Itd be nice to go to grocery shop without having a panic attack. I never wanted to turn to meds but im tired of this life where im not living.
 
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SunnyDaze

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I'm sorry you struggle,I've been in your shoes.

Idk whether diazepam would help,I'm assuming it would though.Are you in therapy?
 
fazza

fazza

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Yes but diazepam is not a cure and the possibility of needing more and more diazepam is a major problem.
Our bodies get used to benzo's requiring us needing more and more to get the required effect. This does not happen to everyone but for a great many sufferers they then get stuck with a benzo addiction then suffer paradoxical effects when withdrawing.

I don't know what the answers are as I am not medically trained but CBT can help many as this type of treatment can help.

Ask your doctor for the best medical advice and if things are really bad phone your doctors surgery and ask for a telephone consultation.
 
Confusedandanxious

Confusedandanxious

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I personally would try and steer away from the likes of diazepam for helping with this. I think it would probably work TOO well, to the point youd rather just go to that than anything else.

There are other meds, that help and are not as strong or addictive. But I think the most helpful and most important thing is the likes of therapy and graddd exposure. I use propanolol and/or buspirone but graded exposure was the most helpful for me.
 
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pink_wink

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To answer your question: in short, yes. Even if I have a panic attack outside, the symptoms are milder. But usually I do not have.

For everyone bringing up dependence and tolerance: @ShutIn has been inside the house for 7 years! In my opinion, a pill for attending a wedding, graduation, or funeral once per year is not going to cause dependence. Dependence varies according to the individual: dosage and frequency, length of usage, weight, fluids intake (as your kidneys can 'flush' it out quickly), metabolism, elimination, plus the pharmacogenomic profile aka "your body might actually simply be made to respond positively to Valium." In my personal opinion, the issue of dependence is brought too often without relevance when we are talking about people in deep suffering who have been housebound for years. Just my personal opinion.
 
Mintymint

Mintymint

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Welcome to the forum, @ShutIn :)

A few years ago I had a neighbour who had agoraphobia and an intolerance to many meds' side effects, so their GP prescribed low dose diazepam (2mg) which they found helpful in the short term (maximum 2x2mg).

What helped was their donning a pair of sunglasses to help reduce the impact of having to go out, eg. to buy essential milk from the corner shop, as these situations do happen and nobody likes it one bit, especially if they don't have instant support. The doctor warned diazepam could be highly addictive, but trusted their patient who, dutifully listed in their meds book, jotted down the time of taking and date. After some success and being trusted by their GP not to become addicted, the neighbour had a monthly prescription. Diazepam really helped them chill down.

If you ask your doctor giving these reasons, then this med may be worth trying.
 
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