• Safety Notice: This section on Psychiatric Drugs/Medications enables people to share their personal experiences of using such drugs/medications. Always seek the advice of your doctor, psychiatrist or other qualified health professional before making any changes to your medications or with any questions you may have regarding drugs/medications. In considering coming off psychiatric drugs it is very important that you are aware that most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should only be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision.

Has anyone sucessfully come off their meds?

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mumu

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Apr 19, 2010
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I'm currently on quite a high dose of anti psychotics.

I was wondering if anyone had successfully come off their meds to lead a perfectly normal drug free life?

One day I would love this. Especially as I am a musician and find that the drugs totally block my creative feeling. And everyone around me goes crazy if I say I want to stop taking meds.
 
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IntrospectionFtw!

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Dec 3, 2009
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Buried under a sand castle.
There are quite a few well known people who've come off the drugs, i know of one person on here that has been off them for about 7 years. Its not an easy task coming off of neuroleptic medication, ive tryed twice after being on them for 3 years and ended up back on them. the longer you've been on them the harder it is to come off of them your brains chemistry changes and becomes use to the drug and almost sick like a heroin addict. the main problem is its a completely different approach and many people are not prepared for it. your almost certainly going to relapse and experience psychotic symptoms probably more severe and intense each time you come off them. it took me a long time to realise it was the drugs which were the problem or part of the problem. its a trap alot of people fall into especially because of all the biased pro medication shit that is thrust upon you when you first become ill. these drugs are not a short term solution for anything they take two weeks to kick in and are damn near impossible to come off of. i wish i had never taken them but maybe for some people it is the best option.
 
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swan

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Oct 10, 2009
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London, UK
I have been on sertraline for 4 months. Started off on 50mg, upped to 100 then 150, of which i took my last dose on friday because i am SO SICK of being medicated.
I used to write, draw, make music every minute of every day and those f**king meds hollowed me out and stripped me of my talents. My depression actually got worse and burdened me with eating disorders and this horrible nagging feeling of unreality. For the first time in my life i am empty of passion.
I have felt so isolated, so separate from the girl i used to be and she misses me and i miss her so badly! So it was for her i went cold turkey despite all the horror stories i have read about ssri withdrawal.
My psychiatrist is a cold hearted pill pusher who has tried to get me on anti-psychotics to counteract symptoms i havent even experienced.
So as you can tell, I am angry and i am willing to go through hell to get my real self back even if she has to live with depression, at least she will be able to use her creativity and passion to cope with it.
 
oneday

oneday

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Jan 28, 2010
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Hi mumu

I can't speak from personal experience cos I've never withdrawn from these drugs myself.

But there's a good book I know - Peter Leahmann's 'Coming off Psychiatric Drugs: Successful Withdrawal from Neuroleptics, Antidepressants, Lithium, Carbamazepine and Tranquillisers'. It's is a collection of stories of people's own experiences, and the different approaches they've used, including various kinds of holistic approaches and alternative therapies.

Another useful resource I know of is the 'Coming Off Psychiatric Medication' website: www.comingoff.com (it's put together by professionals and service users/survivors, including survivor/psychologist Rufus May) - you might find links to other people's stories there too.

I've posted more info on this forum before about resources that might help anyone regarding withdrawing/reducing psychiatric drugs, e.g. see
http://www.mentalhealthforum.net/forum/showthread.php?p=132121#post132121

I think the general message is to plan well, do it slowly, introduce other sources of support/treatment into your life to address the issues that the drug may be dealing with or suppressing e.g. talking therapy to help you understand and deal with your feelings and experiences.

Hope some of this info might be useful.
:) Oneday
 
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Aine

Guest
Hi Mumu. If you decide to come off meds, do it SLOWLY! It is dangerous to do it too quickly. The pace at which you reduce them depends on how long you have been on. A very helpful and supportive (and non-directive) telephone helpline is Battle Against Tranquillizers. They people who man the phone have themselves successfully come off pych drugs - so they understand. Their number is:
0117: 966: 3629
 
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Aine

Guest
Another useful website Is: Coming off Psychiatric Meds It also gives the Icarus 'coming off drugs 'booklet link. It is really good. alternatively you can find this bookl by googling 'icarus project'
 
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