• Safety Notice: This section on Psychiatric Drugs/Medications enables people to share their personal experiences of using such drugs/medications. Always seek the advice of your doctor, psychiatrist or other qualified health professional before making any changes to your medications or with any questions you may have regarding drugs/medications. In considering coming off psychiatric drugs it is very important that you are aware that most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should only be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision.

Harm reduction & safely withdrawing from medications

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#21
Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal and Human Metamorphosis -

Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal and Human Metamorphosis | Mad In America

Laura Delano

November 28, 2013

I write this from my family’s sunroom looking out over the distant Maine ocean, its deep blue color ablaze with specks of gold from the November sun. I’m watching the waves roll in, one after the other, reliably meeting the shore, and I am full of gratitude for their stark contrast with human nature and its potential for profound metamorphosis. The ocean’s waves are constant and unchangeable, bound by earth and gravity; for a long time I believed life was this way, too—that who I was and how I felt and what I believed about myself were all bound by some invisible force that would always keep me trapped in a perpetual state of agonizing being. What a beautiful thing to know that after so many years of believing this, I’ve proven myself wrong.



I woke up this morning, up in Maine for the holiday weekend with my family, with the urge to write about my gratitude for life. I’m sure this holiday of giving thanks has something to do with it, but more than that, I feel the urge to write today because Thanksgiving stands as my life’s most important marker, the measure of my darkest hour, and the touchstone for all the change that’s followed.



FIVE YEARS AGO

This Saturday will mark five years since I tried to kill myself, after making the decision to act on a nearly eight-year long urge to die. It happened on the other side of the woods, about a half-mile down the coastline I’m looking at right now. It was a cold, late afternoon, the sun descending into the horizon, the sight of the sea as beautiful as ever. I knew I wanted the last image I ever set my eyes on to be this, my favorite place in the world, the place my grandparents raised my dad and his siblings. My “Bipolar” sentence of life-long meds, life-long reliance on psychiatrists and psychologists and social workers and psych wards, and life-long inability to fit into the world as a “normal” person had become, for me, a life not worth living. I wanted an end to the pain, the loneliness, the hopelessness, the emptiness. I wanted it more than I’d ever wanted anything else. I made this decision in the room next to where I sit right now, as I looked out the window at this same ocean, that Saturday afternoon five years ago, and I left this house for what I was sure would be the last time.



THREE YEARS AGO

Three years ago, I sat here reflecting on the two-year anniversary of my suicide attempt, and the two-month anniversary of being off the psychiatric drugs I’d been on for nearly half my life. I’d recently met Robert Whitaker for the first time over coffee and started to blog for Mad in America, and was only just beginning to grasp how much I’d lost to Psychiatry over the previous thirteen years. I was full of anger, bitterness, self-victimization, and frustration over the fact that my adolescence and young adulthood had been swallowed up by Psychiatry. I was confused and disoriented, and totally overwhelmed by life off of meds. I was just leaving an intensive outpatient program I’d been in for ten months, and was scared to reenter the “real world”. Every minute of the day, life pushed hard on my fragile and unstable being to the point of near self-implosion. I shut down at the tiniest encounter with stress of any kind, retreating to an empty room so that I could curl up in a ball under heavy blankets and dissociate. Conversations filled me with anxiety and frustration, as organizing words to form coherent sentences to participate in dialogue was like running an exhausting emotional and cognitive marathon over and over again. I swung back and forth between periods of emotional numbness and disconnect, and periods of feeling completely overwhelmed by intense, foreign, overpowering feelings that had me convinced I was a Jekyll and Hyde. I was exhausted to the very core of my being.

I felt trapped in a body that was fifty pounds heavier from psychiatric drugs (I’ve since realized that the “binge-eating disorder” I was told I had was, in fact, largely the result of my completely dysregulated appetite and metabolism caused by the meds), and the only pants I could stand to wear were elastic-waisted ones. Strange smells emanated from my skin, and boils and acne covered my face and neck. Showering more than once a week felt nearly impossible to me, as did brushing my hair. I yearned for sofas in people-less rooms with televisions so that I could stare at the screen for hours on end, desperately hoping to distract myself from my mind, or to fall into the oblivion of conscious-less sleep. My thoughts were inescapable, screaming at me, You are pathetic! You are a piece of shit! You are lazy and a waste of a life! Why can’t you get your act together?!? You don’t belong anywhere! No one will ever understand you! You will never be able to function in the world independently! Why are you even trying? Those psychiatrists were right—you’re crazy—how can you think you can function without them? I found only glimpses of relief from this in pints of frozen yogurt (for by that time I’d quit drinking alcohol), South Park and Law and Order, Sudoku and crossword puzzles (in the beginning of withdrawal, both were nearly impossible!), and needlepointing. Sleep during the day was my one true escape, and only recently had I begun to sleep at night after months of insomnia.

As I sat here in this sunroom at the beginning of my awakening from Psychiatry, I was like a newborn, struggling to walk, to form words, to absorb the world around me, to participate in life. I felt vulnerable and completely exposed to everything around me. To be awake was to be nearly debilitated by fear and confusion and deep grief at all I believed I’d lost to the drugs and the “mentally ill” identity. Three years ago, at two months off of the last of the lithium, Lamictal, Abilify, Effexor, Ativan, and a PRN of Seroquel, I felt like I was barely living. All I could do was go through the motions of life and survive.



TWO YEARS AGO

Two years ago, as I sat here at Thanksgiving time, I was a little over a year off psychiatric drugs. I was still trapped in a body that didn’t feel like mine, and still at the mercy of painful and confusing thoughts and emotions, but shifts had happened. Time had given me distance from Psychiatry, and this distance had slowly brought me closer to a sense that I could eventually be an autonomous person with an autonomous Self, even though I was still completely unsure of what that meant. I slowly started to recognize how afraid I was of myself, of my emotions, of my mind, and while it would be some time before I’d come to see that this fear was the cornerstone of my psychiatric indoctrination, I was at least becoming aware of it, and getting better at naming it. In naming this fear, I was able to create distance from it, and to see that while I couldn’t control the thoughts it was placing in my mind—You are too weak, too pathetic, too broken, too far gone to function in this world! You will never fully heal! You will never be successful at anything and will always be dependent on your family! You will always just be a mental patient!— I didn’t have to believe them. And in this important, albeit painful space of awareness, I began to find respite from the emotional pain. I also began to understand that I was not my withdrawal; that this excruciating pain was something that was happening to me, but wasn’t who I was. Slowly, I began to imagine that there might be life for me beyond this, as a human being truly free from Psychiatry. I began to think of the unknown—the future, who I would be once I’d healed from psych drugs, what it was I was meant to contribute to the world—not just as something to be afraid of, but also something to be curious about. This all started as a fantasy, but in this sacred space between myself and my fear, and between myself and my withdrawal, I began to believe that perhaps I had a meaningful life ahead of me.

While the emotional struggles—anxiety, deep sadness, anger, irritability, guilt, and shame—were much the same, the changes in the way I was understanding my pain gave me enough evidence to hang in there, to keep putting one foot in front of the other, to keep orienting myself towards the future, no matter how scared I was of it or how much agony I was still in. Two years ago, I slowly began to have faith in myself, and in my capacity to keep changing, even if I wasn’t fully conscious of it yet. Continuing forward each day in spite of the pain was an act of that self-faith.

At the end of that weekend two years ago, I remember driving over to the emergency room to leave a ‘Thank You’ card for the emergency room doctor who kept my unconscious body alive until the LifeFlight arrived to take me to Massachusetts General Hospital. In that card, I wrote about how grateful I was that my life had been saved so that I could have a second chance at being human. I remember writing those words and not being sure of what they even meant, just knowing that I needed to write them. I see now that at a year off of psychiatric drugs, I was starting to experience gratitude, still mostly in small glimmers, but sometimes even lasting up to days at a time, amidst the emotional agony. It was then that I came to see that hope and emotional pain can coexist, and that hope is in fact most powerful when it endures in the midst of suffering. I had no idea where my life was going or how I’d be able to live it, but I knew then, for the first time, that it was going somewhere and that somehow, perhaps, I was strong enough to stick around and find out.



TODAY

In this sunroom over the last thirty years, I’ve sat in my grandparents’ and parents’ laps, wheeled doll strollers across the floor, played with toys, given dogs belly rubs, read books, looked out at the ocean, struggled with life, planned my death, and re-embraced what it means to be human. It’s funny to think back to how the ‘me’ of three years ago—two months off the meds, sitting here in agony, wanting to rip my skin off and shut my mind off and scream at the top of my lungs in emotional pain—would most likely have responded if she was told that in three years’ time she’d feel peace of mind, and a connection to herself, to the world around her, and to a life that is meaningful and authentic. I don’t think she would have believed it, and likely, she’d have dismissed the idea as totally impossible and even, well, cheesy. But this is where I find myself today, still early on in my healing journey, but far enough to now fully believe that life will continue to unfold before me in the most amazing of ways if I let it, and if I allow myself to have faith in the human condition, no matter how afraid I am. I believe this to be true for every single person out there who finds him- or herself in the midst of psychiatric drug withdrawal (in the midst of any kind of struggle, for that matter!).

I couldn’t have predicted or planned out the way my life has evolved, and this is what has finally made the process of recovering from psychiatry so liberating: because I can now trust in the inherently uncomfortable process of being human, I no longer feel the need to fight it, and can stop trying to understand it and dissect it and control it through having it all figured out. It’s allowed me to accept myself, my mind, and my emotions, even on my toughest days, because I know today that nothing is permanent, and that I’m an active agent in my life, rather than a passive recipient of it (which is, of course, what Psychiatry taught me to believe for all those years that it told me I had a brain disease beyond my control). It may sound paradoxical, but this new life I’ve found myself in post-Psychiatry has happened both because of me, and in spite of me.

As I sit in this chair a little over three years free from psychiatric drugs and a “mentally ill” identity, I write these words with hands connected to my human spirit, which Psychiatry was never able to extinguish no matter how much it drugged me or locked me away from myself. On a daily basis, I feel joy and pain and everything in between, and it is genuine and meaningful. l am in love with life—even on its most difficult days, which happen more than rarely— and just as I once made the shift from fear to curiosity of the unknown, in the past year, I’ve shifted from curiosity to excitement of all that’s to come. While I still feel quite overwhelmed by day-to-day living—by all the sensory stimuli, the intense thoughts and emotions that have emerged since getting off the drugs, the occasional paranoia about how others around me perceive me, and the meaningful connections with people from all around the world who’ve been through similar struggles—it is an overwhelm that I now find fulfilling instead of draining.

My body is very much healing. I sense that my metabolism is almost back to where it was always meant to be. My menstrual cycle returned this past spring after disappearing for two and a half years when I began to come off psych drugs (I’m also healing from twelve years of the birth control pill, which I came off of this past spring, but that’s a whole different story!). My sexual function—completely gone while I was medicated—has returned. While my thyroid is still damaged from lithium, I’ve been able to make the switch from synthetic thyroid hormone to natural pig thyroid, which for me is a step in the right direction. My adrenal system is still off, but I’m confident it will continue to right itself as I sort out what my body needs nutritionally and how to manage stress more effectively. I can tell my different systems are still detoxifying from all those years of psychoactive chemicals, but I am privileged and lucky enough to be able to eat clean, organic, whole food. Perhaps most importantly, I, for the first time, feel connected enough to my body to actually be able to take good care of it, and to believe it’s worth taking care of in the first place.

My mind is getting clearer and sharper by the day. I feel more creative than ever before (just a couple of years ago, producing a piece of writing was an agonizing, draining, forced process of mental manipulation; today, when I’m ready to write, I feel like I can tap right into my heart). Just a few years back, I was unable to absorb words on a page; this has slowly gotten better over time and I’m once again enjoying reading. While I still struggle with memory problems, I have faith in my brain’s plasticity and believe that my cognitive processes will continue to get better over time. Day-to-day simple tasks and errands no longer feel paralyzing like they used to. When I make plans with others, I’m able to keep them today, no longer debilitated by social anxiety like I was just a year or two ago. In fact, most of the time, I look forward to socializing—never would have believed it a few years back!

Because of all that’s happened in my life post-Psychiatry, I have more faith in myself and in each and every human being’s capacity to heal and transform than I ever did before. No matter how much oppression, dehumanization and hopelessness we’ve faced, I believe in my deepest depths that we can reclaim ourselves and create a meaningful, contented life. The most critical first step is simply having hope that it’s possible; indeed, all one needs to make a start is just a glimmer of hope. While everyone’s path is different, and each person has different kinds of stressors, responsibilities, obstacles, and access (or lack thereof) to supports, the seed of transformation is planted in each and every one of us—this, I believe. It is my hope that as time goes on and more and more people begin to awaken from psychiatric oppression, our communities will be better able to provide the needs and supports of people getting off psych drugs. (Here, in the Boston area, we’ve started our own mutual support group network. If you’d like to start one in your own community, you are more than welcome to use our introduction and group format, which you can find here under ‘Coming off Psych Drugs’)

As I sit here writing these words, looking out at an ocean that’s witnessed me grow up, come to the brink of my death, and grow back into a new life, I am awed by human metamorphosis, and by the undefinable, unpredictable, awe-inspiring nature of it.

Normally, it doesn’t feel comfortable for me to write to “you”, the reader, but something is compelling me to do so today, so I’ve decided to go for it: if you’re out there and you find yourself in the throes of psychiatric drug withdrawal, hang in there. If thoughts are assaulting you about your worthlessness, the pointlessness in going forward, the need to give up, the waste of a life you’ve lived under Psychiatry’s grasp, the burden you are to those around you, or any of the countless toxic narratives that can take us over as we fight for psychiatric liberation, remind yourself that these thoughts, while perhaps beyond your control, do not have to be your Truth. For me, I’ve made sense of them as manifestations of fear, a fear that was largely ingrained in me by Psychiatry: a fear of one’s Self, of one’s feelings, of one’s mind. Today, I know that I am nothing to be afraid of, and this, for me, is a daily practice of psychiatric liberation.

If you’re months or even years off of psychiatric drugs and you’re losing hope because you haven’t seen measurable evidence of your healing, hang in there. Undoubtedly, changes are happening within you that you just haven’t been made aware of yet. Remind yourself that our brains and bodies are incredibly strong, resilient, and plastic, and can heal from tremendous trauma. For me, it was a critical part of my withdrawal journey that I came to trust that healing was possible even when there didn’t seem to be evidence for it. I simply had to believe I could reclaim my life from Psychiatry, even when I had absolutely no understanding of how to do it. For a time, I couldn’t have faith in myself because I felt too hopeless; what I did, instead, was look to the stories of others who’d been through the experience before me and survived to tell the tale (of the many people who’ve inspired me, Monica Cassani at Beyond Meds, Matt Samet, and David Webb are right up there). I held onto faith in stories like these, until I finally became able to have it in myself. (I’ve written more in depth about this in a previous post on my experiences with psychiatric drug withdrawal).

Heraclitus, a Greek philosopher, once said, “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man.” I twice found myself drowning in the river of my life, my entire being nearly destroyed, first by Psychiatry, and then by psychiatric drug withdrawal. I floundered and desperately reached for whatever I could to stay afloat, swallowing water, losing air, losing hope. I felt weak, powerless, flimsy, fragile, convinced there was no way out. Overwhelmed by my suffering, I felt utterly unable to conceive of any kind of change, or to see light at the end of the tunnel. Indeed, for me at least, wearing the lens of fear and suffering makes seeing life as anything other than hopeless nearly impossible.

Today, that river and I, as Heraclitus said, have changed. Life still pulses strong and sometimes catches me in its swells and tides, but I am different in it, and it is different around me. The waters of psychiatric trauma and subsequent healing have been raging, pounding my very being against rocks, sometimes pushing me under to the point of suffocation, but in learning how to float instead of thrash against the current, I’ve grown and strengthened and reclaimed my Self, and in doing so, the waters around me have settled significantly. Time, itself, has settled those waters, and will only continue to do so. As I write these words and look out to the rolling, repetitive waves before me I am reminded that the only constant in my life is change. Growth. Metamorphosis. Never again must I feel like a prisoner to my suffering, no matter how big or how permanent it may seem. Nothing about who I am or how I feel or what I believe about myself is set in stone, and this, to me, is what psychiatric liberation is all about.
 
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Note: In the end it took me somewhat over six years to complete my withdrawal. It’s now 7 months later. I’m getting better, but it’s at a glacial pace. We do recover, in time and not everyone gets sick like this by a long shot, though it’s by no means unusual in the withdrawal forums to see this either.
hi CPU, just reading this thread which I thought I'd read, but perhaps I've forgotten and wondered if you had managed to get off all medications??

Also, just came across this website about getting off psych drugs and see that they use a similar approach to another site called The Road Back with nutritional supplements. Also I note that they admit on their site that some diagnoses may originally have been caused by a nutritional deficiency. Nutrition Program for Drug Withdrawal | Drug Withdrawal Research Foundation
 
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hi CPU, just reading this thread which I thought I'd read, but perhaps I've forgotten and wondered if you had managed to get off all medications??
Hi. The quote is from someone else's story. i know it must get a bit confusing at times with the amount of articles i post.

i have maintained a low dose of a neuroleptic (anti-psychotic) medication, for the past 10 years, which i recently increased slightly a few month ago. i have not been able to successfully stop taking it, despite trying in the past. i'm not anti medications, & do see a role for them - i do feel far more understanding & support should be given to people though & free informed choice around taking psychiatric drugs.

Also, just came across this website about getting off psych drugs and see that they use a similar approach to another site called The Road Back with nutritional supplements. Also I note that they admit on their site that some diagnoses may originally have been caused by a nutritional deficiency. Nutrition Program for Drug Withdrawal | Drug Withdrawal Research Foundation
Yea, i came across them years ago. Thanks for the link - i think some people find them helpful. i've not personally found the nutritional areas to have made much of a difference in my own case. Maybe some people do have nutritional issues linked to their mental health?
 
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I know that we're on the same antipsychotic stuck at a similar dose, which I hope you won't mind me mentioning as I believe you've mentioned it in another place on the forum - amisulpride - I haven't find anything about withdrawal from this online other than several accounts of people who have also been stuck. I can't help wondering if there's something particular about this drug that causes more difficulty?? Maybe that's not the case, but I haven't heard from anyone who's successfully come off it.

Sorry that was a bit long-winded but hopefully understandable. I'm rushing because I have to get ready to go out.

When I cut down from 300mg to 250mg (which I did in one go which I realise wasn't really wise but I got totally fed up but as I used to take 200mg happily I kept thinking that my body would adapt) - I experienced one night when I had a strange psychotic sensation in my brain/thoughts when I was thinking really deeply about something I was very worried and stressed over. But as I talked my way through the thoughts that were surfacing the sensation quickly subsided and then I felt ok. I haven't felt jittery since which in the past has been an indication that perhaps I'm not coping. I definitely believe that it was a reaction to sudden withdrawal.

Better dash ....
 
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Nicola398

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Hi apple, do you mind me asking if you have tried the approach and nutritional supplements recommended by
The Road Back site ever an do you know anyone used them and successfully came off their drug?I was considering them about six years ago but they were pricey and I worried about taking stuff being sent through the post that I wouldn't necessarily know what is in it or what it's effects on my body would be.I was scared to come off even though they said doing it that way was safe.NicolaX
 
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I know that we're on the same antipsychotic stuck at a similar dose, which I hope you won't mind me mentioning as I believe you've mentioned it in another place on the forum - amisulpride - I haven't find anything about withdrawal from this online other than several accounts of people who have also been stuck. I can't help wondering if there's something particular about this drug that causes more difficulty?? Maybe that's not the case, but I haven't heard from anyone who's successfully come off it.

Sorry that was a bit long-winded but hopefully understandable. I'm rushing because I have to get ready to go out.

Sorry to hear that you had to go slightly up on your dose. I've just come down from 300mg to 250mg. I'm hoping and aiming to get it back down to 200mg which is where I was stable at in the past before a hospital admission (which happened quickly after cutting to 150mg) when a mad psychiatrist put me up to 600mg, which I couldn't tolerate.

Better dash ....
i don't mind discussing it. Yes, i was on 200mg of amisulpride for 10 years, & upped it to 300mg a few months ago. 16 years ago i was put on a 1200mg dose for a year - i stopped it, was sectioned, refused medications for a while, but eventually agreed to a 200mg dose. i tried twice more at stopping, with disastrous results, & incredibly severe illness. i'm kind of left in a catch 22 & perpetual dependence. i'd rather be on this drug the rest of my life, than repeat what i experienced in the last withdrawal, but i'd also like to be free of this drug - But i can't attempt another withdrawal without a lot of understanding, help & support - which isn't there, & which i've not been able to find/access. So i carry on taking the pills.

Interesting what you observe about not hearing any stories about a successful withdrawal from this drug - i haven't either, i don't recall. i think it has a very powerful & complex chemical action on the brain. i think my brain was fucked up originally - being very heavily medicated/traumatised at the age of 17, drugged again age 21 & then the large dose of amisulpride age 25. i think it all fucked me up in a way & did something profound to my brain - But there's no rewinding time thank you Einstein.

Feel i need comprehensive understanding, help & support - before anything else, & before any possibility of another reduction - where is it/& where to access it? It's not there in the ways i need it. A part of me has to concede as well, given the lack of access to viable alternatives & hypotheticals as to what may/could have been - this drug does keep me stable - the increase does appear to have helped me a bit. A part of me wonders what another increase would be like in improving certain aspects of my life? With the risk/benefit ratio. i think the time to have done something & responded very differently to the difficulties i had, would have been 25 to 30 years ago. i wonder now if some things can really be sorted out? 16 years on this drug (minus the 3 times i stopped & got very unwell) i wonder if it's even possible now to ever successfully get off it? Sadly i doubt it is - & there is that endless catch 22/Double Bind surrounding the issue of my circumstances & lack of understanding/support. As it is........

i don't want to sound self pitying/ungrateful in any of that either. It's just the way it all is. Some people 'get lucky' getting off these drugs - others don't.
 
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Hi apple, do you mind me asking if you have tried the approach and nutritional supplements recommended by
The Road Back site ever an do you know anyone used them and successfully came off their drug?I was considering them about six years ago but they were pricey and I worried about taking stuff being sent through the post that I wouldn't necessarily know what is in it or what it's effects on my body would be.I was scared to come off even though they said doing it that way was safe.NicolaX
Hi Nicola, I didn't try it although I was really tempted too - it was the cost that put me off and the uncertainty of whether it would work and whether I'd have to keep paying to stay on the supplements long term. Having said that though, I am thinking again about whether to try and up the supplements I take.

I did look at all the ingredients that were in the supplements they sell and its possible to get them quite a bit cheaper through mainstream health shops if you look up what's in them on the road back drug manufacturer's site. One thing I remember which I think was for tardive dyskinesia was cherry extract.

I think I worked out that it would cost at least £1000 to take the supplements - I can't remember if it was six months or a year - to give what I thought would be a decent amount of time to try to taper off gradually. But perhaps its possible to do it a lot cheaper now?

When I cut down from 300mg to 250mg (which I did in one go which I realise wasn't really wise but I got totally fed up but as I used to take 200mg happily I kept thinking that my body would adapt) - I experienced one night when I had a strange psychotic sensation in my brain/thoughts when I was thinking really deeply about something I was very worried and stressed over. But as I talked my way through the thoughts that were surfacing the sensation quickly subsided and then I felt ok. I haven't felt jittery since which in the past has been an indication that perhaps I'm not coping. I definitely believe that it was a reaction to sudden withdrawal.

But I think that in order to have a shot at withdrawing more again - at least certainly below 200mg, I need to look back at what might have triggered me having delusions and paranoia in the beginning otherwise they would surface again. Obviously everyone is different, but I would really like to check out schema therapy to see if repressed emotions/stress from things in the past have affected the way my brain works and whether I've got some problematic beliefs that have been causing the problem. I understand that its possible to do it for a much shorter amount of time than traditional psychotherapy, it's just whether I can afford it - I've just made at an inquiry at a centre an hour's bus ride away.

I'm pretty desperate to try and get off this drug because I've been feeling quite ill due to the diabetes, plus my hair has been badly receding and I've had stomach problems - so I think that it's been poisoning my system. But I'm wondering if a complete withdrawal, if my brain would adapt, would possibly take years because of how long its been in my body.

I've just written a lot more than I thought I was going to. I wish that we could all go to the Alternative to Meds Centre in the US to get a good go at a detox.
 
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i tried twice more at stopping, with disastrous results, & incredibly severe illness. i'm kind of left in a catch 22 & perpetual dependence. i'd rather be on this drug the rest of my life, than repeat what i experienced in the last withdrawal, but i'd also like to be free of this drug - But i can't attempt another withdrawal without a lot of understanding, help & support - which isn't there, & which i've not been able to find/access. So i carry on taking the pills.

.
I can relate, because it's really off-putting when you try and withdraw and then you experience a complete breakdown and the support isn't there and then you are coerced into taking more drugs. I'm sorry, being in a similar position I sometimes feel very stressed and depressed about it. I have felt that I've made a little progress, albeit small, with taking supplements that I'm on so far, so I'm going to try for the therapy too. The science hasn't caught up with the circumstances that we're in yet.
 
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Nicola398

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It looks like there are 3 of us here so far with exactly the same problems with this drug, amisulpride, I only know it didn't cause my diabetes cos I developed that before I first got it and way before I took this drug.CPU doesn't have diabetes either, but it could have caused your diabetes apple, cos the wierdest thing is how each drug causes different side effect in different people, we don't all get the same side effects on them, very strange.
 
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Nicola398

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You aren't alone CPU, I am stuck on Amisulpride and can't get off it too!:BLAH:
I have resigned myself to it for now and also am more relaxed about it than I used to be.
I think it is more important to see that I have some quality to my life and stay as well as I can be.:)NicolaX
 
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You aren't alone CPU, I am stuck on Amisulpride and can't get off it too!:BLAH:
I have resigned myself to it for now and also am more relaxed about it than I used to be.
I think it is more important to see that I have some quality to my life and stay as well as I can be.:)NicolaX
Yea, that's all we can do. Only hope really i feel is a major shift for the better either/both in personal circumstances/inner World - & with a drastic shift within society/the MH system towards these areas/conditions/experiences - which i find very hard to see happening in my lifetime? Best to not get too resentful or angry about it all, but 'they' are fuckers for the way it all is.
 
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#35
Hi,
Safely withdrawal of medication is as important as completion of full course. It is necessary that patient follow all the prescription instructions properly. Sudden withdrawal of anti psychotic medication can cause serious withdrawal symptoms in patient.
 
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@niamh2014

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#36
Hi, Ya I do believe personally, well this is just me i'm sure much agree aswell that drugs/medications prescribed to most ARE most of the time not doing them any good. I have read a lot on people's stories how taking drugs/medications has done the reverse.. these medications/prescribed drugs = also known as chemical drugs and anything I think with any chemical in it is obviously going to be harmless?!....
anyway.. last February unfortunately not really realising much how it's bad, very bad to go off medication too quick and you need to come off them slowly rather than just straight away, and i became over this whole year more depressed , withdrawing, had thoughts the odd time of suicide, anxiety was kinda gone bad again. But i've been good this past while better but i believe actually that going off the meds/tablets too soon prob resulted in becoming more depressed etc.. I have started taking these oils a couple of months now, also doing techniques/ exercises for different things, reading up on things and understanding the REAL effects of these so called great tablets, anti-psychotic medication. I have also started eating healthy more but I believe the way I was the months before hand was because I had gone off meds too early. Going to make use of a new treadmill :D and eat healthy! way more! , only way to get rid of mainly mood/ depressive and anxiety disorders. I was reading a book by a guy called Ronnie Plant called ''Selling Sickness'' my aunt gave it to my dad, he talks about the real truth behind most prescribed medications. It's very interesting.
 
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Shining

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#38
cpuusage,

I see that you have a lot of knowledge about coming off psychiatric medication. I am using some of the links you posted to learn more. I'm helping my daughter to come off medication. I understand that we should decrease 10% at a time. It is a process that we really don't know for sure where it will lead us. But I think it is important to have people to share the experience, and to get knowledge about medication and how the shrinks use them (trial and error.) Sometimes we get lost. But we need to focus on the personal equilibrium and wellness.

I'm new to this forum. I'm still learning to use it. I understand that you started the process of tapering your medication some years ago. One thing I would like to add, as that my belief after reading the book "Nutrient Power", by William Walsh is that most mental illnesses are epigenetic. The biochemistry of our body can be corrected with natural nutrients existing in foods. The psychiatric drugs can help in some things, but they DO NOT HEAL, and can cause terrible side effects. Vitamins and minerals found in nature, and used carefully by trained physicians, can do the same as pharmaceutical drugs without the side effects, because we naturally swallow them in the food we eat. The biochemical processes in our bodies use vitamins and minerals to create and transport neuro-transmiters.

Nutrition is extremely important, but the foods may contain nutrients that are not good for our specific biochemistry. It is necessary to have blood and urine exam to determine more elements of our biochemistry. Some doctors also request hair analysis.

My daughter is taking six pharmaceutical drugs at the moment. The great point is that she does not have psychosis now. She has already stopped the oral 3 mg Risperidal with the permission and guidance of her psychiatrist. Ten days ago, she decreased 300 mg of Lithium Carbonate. It was a lot, but she is OK.

She still takes 600 mg of Lithium, Risperidone Consta 37.5 injection, Lorazepan, Sertraline 100 mg, Temazepan 30 mg, and Nicorette (better than cigarette). We plan to start reducing Temazepan, without asking the doc, today. I read in several places that Temazepam should be used for a short period of time as a sleeping pill. She has been using for over 6 months this time. The psychatrist does not really care. It is habit forming. Now I'm educating myself about medication, and passing the information to my daughter. She is not well enough to read and write.

This psychatrist has been treating her for six years. She has changed her diagnosis from bipolar I to schizoaffective. At least she knows that my daughter has the Nutrient Therapy treatment. We share the information of test results and prescriptions with both doctors. We gave the psychiatrist Dr. Walsh's book. She said that she read and found it informative.

I think the Nutrient Therapy is much better than the pharmaceutical treatment. But Walsh says on the book that from the patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar treated with nutrients, just 5% could be totally out of psychiatric drugs. But all of them, using nutrients, reduced the doses to a minimal amount.

They are continuing the research, and Walsh mentions that Epigenetics research may lead to a cure of schizophrenia (page 54).

If you want to go to Walsh Research Institute website, you can watch videos, read articles, and find information about clinics/physicians in Europe who use the same protocol. I imagine that you live in England as most people in this Forum.

Thank you for posting a lot of useful links, and sharing your experience. :cheer:








Yea, that's all we can do. Only hope really i feel is a major shift for the better either/both in personal circumstances/inner World - & with a drastic shift within society/the MH system towards these areas/conditions/experiences - which i find very hard to see happening in my lifetime? Best to not get too resentful or angry about it all, but 'they' are fuckers for the way it all is.
 
cpuusage

cpuusage

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#39
I think the Nutrient Therapy is much better than the pharmaceutical treatment. But Walsh says on the book that from the patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar treated with nutrients, just 5% could be totally out of psychiatric drugs. But all of them, using nutrients, reduced the doses to a minimal amount.

They are continuing the research, and Walsh mentions that Epigenetics research may lead to a cure of schizophrenia (page 54).

If you want to go to Walsh Research Institute website, you can watch videos, read articles, and find information about clinics/physicians in Europe who use the same protocol. I imagine that you live in England as most people in this Forum.

Thank you for posting a lot of useful links, and sharing your experience. :cheer:
Hi. i wish you all the best with your daughters treatment & healing/recovery. Am glad you got something from this thread.

Some people do find orthomolecular treatment very beneficial.

My last withdrawal/stopping attempt was 10 to 12 years ago - i did a 2 year reduction & stopped the medication - it didn't work out for me. i have taken a low dose of one medication since & that seems for me to currently be the best compromise.

Some people do successfully get medication free, & others don't. i'm too afraid of what would happen to try another withdrawal, & feel i need far more understanding & support before i would consider it again.

It does seem wise for people to get to as low/wise use/med free place as possible.;

Best wishes.
 
Nikita

Nikita

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#40
Hello shining,
I recommend you PM ing member ||||ME|||| for advice on withdrawing as he is very knowledgable on the subject and there are quite a few of his old threads you can find and read,sorry I do not have the links to post myself.Always though slow tapering is best when coming off any psychiatric drug.I wish you and your daughter all the very best.Nikitax
 
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