Gut Bacteria & Depression!

J

Jules5

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2019
Messages
547
Location
Florida
#2
Ian, very convincing article. My stomach takes the biggest part of my anxiousness. When I do not feel well mentally my stomach shows the first signs.


Let me know if you find any good foods or vitamins that could help. I know exercise seems to release endorphines that alliveate stress.
 
I

Ian Haines

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 5, 2012
Messages
144
Location
Merseyside, North West England.
#3
Jules...

It's easy to get confused between something that alleviates anxiety, and something that eases depression. When tranquillisers are given to a suffer of anxiety, the dose amount is absolutely critical, because tranquillisers are...DEPRESSION creating, above the right dose. When anti-depressants are given to a sufferer of depression, the dose amount is important because many modern anti-depressants cause agitation. That agitation is like an increase in "attention" and "energy to think and then go on to do". The next point I'd like to make is actually not easy to get across, right away.

Think of a square: you're living in the top left corner if you're suffering anxiety - tranquillisers take you diagonally down to the bottom right corner, but that's where depression lives. Now...imagine that, in depression, you're at the bottom left corner...anti-depressants raise you up, yes, but they are taking you to the top right corner, where anxiety lives. The top of the square = anxiety and the bottom = depression. The two treatment results cross over in the middle and head for the opposite of what you were suffering. Finding the right dose stops you going too far, and ending up suffering from the opposite of what you were.

Other ways exist to combat depression.

What that means is that you have to do 2 basic things: 1. You have to decide which aspect you suffer from is more urgently in need of treating: anxiety or depression, and get onto the right dose as soon as possible. 2. You have to do the waiting game, because anti-depressants really take around 2-4 months to take effect, and it's easy to be on the wrong one for too long before you realise. Turn yourself into a project and excel at that project. No matter how long you've been depressed

Depression has a lot of enemies: a. exercise. b. activity in the company of others. c. change/s (general life, or minor domestic (decorating, rearranging furniture, new carpets) etc..). d. crying with something to remember or think about, so you're doing the crying for real. Crying without a reason has no therapeutic value. Crying with a reason is a Godsend. e. getting anger out! (This can't be done unless you feel angry. You couldn't, for example, right now...just walk over to a punching bag and get your anger out if you're not feeling anger when you go over there! Anger should be cautiously let out when it's being felt, provided that safety is observed....SAFETY can't be overdone when getting anger out and it should never be a person you let that anger out on.) Tip: Don't punch anything with your hand, at those times...use something comfortable to hold - you don't need a broken hand at this time to add to all that you're suffering.

Ian.
 
A

Alladyn1919

ACCOUNT CLOSED
Joined
Jan 23, 2019
Messages
67
Location
Poland
#4
When speaking about natural enemies of depression it should be noted that it's arch enemy is daylight.It's strangr that nobody (except myself) talks about such an important antidepressant.Exposure of eyes to daylight that is.Now there is absolutely no doubt about that.For SAD sufferers it may be even sufficient treatment for other depressives is not sufficient but still make difference in most if not all cases.There is even some science behind that, there are some relevant recepptors in the eyes, daylight or something transformed from daylight enter some region of the brain and and have some healing properties.Something like that.But it is well known prom practice,from experience of depressives who know about it and use it.I know it from my own experience though strangely enough didn't notice that till I was told about it (by only one out of several ps. I had contact with)..Pretty soon it became obvious to me that that daylight makes a lot of difference.I wonder why I didn't notice it earlier.I did notice improvement in sunny, bright days and deterioration in dark cloudy ones but I thought that there is something harmful in the clouds.Anyway depression usually makes people rather dull and they often fail to notice often even obvious things, more proper infrences come with some delay, etc,etc.Another matter is that that beneficial effect often come with some postponment so it may be difficult to link it to improvement.SAD light is also effective for non SAD depressive though less so.Even depressants seem to be working better if taken in conjunction with daylight exposure.Maytbe some synegetic effect, kind of 1+1=3.And it doesn't have to be a bright sunshine.Much less intense daylight have positive effect.
It is my sincere advise to any depressives on this forum and elsewhere to consider this and inquire about details.It's not at all the case of something being too good to be true about that daylight.It's the case of something which is absurdly unknown, underestimated, undervalued.

Alladyn1919
 
A

Alladyn1919

ACCOUNT CLOSED
Joined
Jan 23, 2019
Messages
67
Location
Poland
#6
...and, f. Lots of daylight/sunlight is reported to help!

Thanks for that, Alladyn1919

Is it a derision?

I think people should get better informed about something before making derisive comments.

Alladyn1919
 
J

johnram

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2018
Messages
169
#7
g. eating clean (well the opposite, eating bad seems to strike my mood down)