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Getting a Diagnonsense

I

ImTrying

Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
20
I was just wondering for those of you that have been diagnosed with BPD how old you were when you were diagnosed, were you misdiagnosed before, do you think having a diagnosis is helpful to you?

I have been treated for clinical depression intermittently since I was 14, I have been on several antidepressants but often stop taking them for periods when I feel I no longer need them, and have had some problems with alcohol around these times. I have been asked questions about manic depression in assessments before, but most of my experience with psychiatrists they seem quite hesitant to commit themselves.
I don't think that I have BPD, I understand that it is a very serious disorder, and that most people when they read the symptoms relate to some of them.
On the other hand, I don't feel I am getting enough support with my depression, and I worry about my anxiety problems.

Ok, sorry to ramble, any information about your experience with mental health teams and diagnoses would be very helpful to me.
 
M

maudikie

Guest
maudikie.

Mental illnesses are difficult to diagnose as at present there are no tests available. Rethink have been urging no labelling, but in my opinion unless you have a diagnosis you are not able to adjust and cope, and this applies to carers as well.
Have you asked your psychiatrist directly and told him that you want a diagnosis(please!0 If you have no appointment soon I should go to your G.P. and ask him/her. There are lots of leaflets which will give you information but you need to have the dictor's opinion first or your imagination can run away with you!.
Best wishes:)
 
I

ImTrying

Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
20
maudikie - thanks for your reply. i did ask my therapist if i could get a diagnosis and she said she didn't think it would be helpful. i will bring it up with my GP.
 
A

AussieGirl

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2010
Messages
54
Location
London
hiya

Hey there, so I officially got diagnosed with bipolar when I was 22 (so at the start of this year)

But through that, since I was 12 (yes, ten years of torture) I have been misdiagnosed with ADHD, OCD, general depression and a myriad of other things.

It has been a complete burden lifted and I feel like I really understand now. I definitely feel alot better knowing what is wrong with me.

Good luck xx
 
I

ImTrying

Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
20
AussieGirl- Glad to hear you're feeling better. What changed this last year to result in you getting your diagnosis? Was it a new doctor or new symptoms?
I'm really curious as to how someone goes from being treated for general depression for years and then being given a specific diagnosis, because this is sort of the problem I have been having.
 
A

AussieGirl

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2010
Messages
54
Location
London
Thanks :) It's been a damn long road..and it's still an uphill battle. Well in this last year, I've moved from Australia to London, so am far away from my family, and have had a bit of uprooting, as well as putting on alot of weight (28kgs..) and a new doctor, so all of the above. My situation in the last year has exacerbated my symptoms but it took a good doctor to realise that it wasn't depression + adhd and that the manic/reckless behaviour was part of a specific diagnosis.

For me, to be honest, it was this doctor, I basically went in there and laid it all on the table that I was feeling incredible highs, horrific lows and really weird and confusing mixed states. I wrote a list (I am obsessive too..it was alphabetised) and I pushed and pushed until I got somewhere. I also had my partner advocating on my behalf telling them that this was not just depression, that the spending, the crazy sex drive, the euphoric ideas etc weren't normal. I also got rushed forward because I tried to take all my medicine in one go...and was having serious suicidal thoughts...

I was originally up north in the lake district but found every doctor I saw up there HORRIBLE and completely unwilling to listen, and slightly annoyed that I was an Australian (albeit with a british passport) using their NHS..

Have you thought about seeing a new doctor and explaining all your symptoms??
 
R

rasselas

Guest
...

I like your neologism, Diagnonsense. It's a good pun.

I understand and appreciate all the reasons why many people desire a diagnosis and how socially useful these words can be.

However, personally, I'd go along with your coinage; it's diagnonsense.

It is my opinion that there really isn't any such thing as any of these so-called mental illnesses. People don't have bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia or depression. They have psychological struggles, difficulties and experience extremes of mood and pheneomena - but these aren't something they've caught. You don't catch an illness from being abused as a child. You don't catch an illness from being smacked in the face by a violent husband. You don't catch an illness from living in an alienated, paranoid, cruel and highly competitive capitalist society. You don't catch an illness from being frightened and made fearful by religion. You don't catch an illness from experiencing the horrors of war. You don't catch an illness from looking differently to the people around you, because of your colour, or your culture and being treated with suspicion and animosity.

You can make yourself unwell by over-using psychoactive drugs like alcohol, cannabis, caffeine, prozac or abilify. You can make yourself unwell by eating crappy food, not exercising, not drinking enough water.

But when you put a label on all this, I personally see it as far more damaging than it is helpful, especially if, like me, you don't buy into all this 'chemical imbalance/fixing' faith-based approaches with highly toxic drugs.

I think when they get people young, especially when they get people young, and start drugging them, many will go on to get bigger and bigger problems. So a person may start out with reactive depression - the drugs that are given to 'correct' that lead to damage that creates much worse episodes of clinical depression, drugs for which then lead to problems with mood regulation, sleep, weight, memory, learning etc. For many this all culminates in early onset dementia - so you have a steady curve upwards towards greater and greater dependency.

I don't mean to say that labels and drugs don't have their place. They obviously do have their place, because the reality is that psychiatry's current experiment is centred around these labels and these drugs. However, I would always encourage people to consider the dark side to all this faith-based medicine and have an eye always on the longer term implications of what a full initiation into the faith may have in store for them.

I have yet to meet anyone who has been diagnosed with a major label that doesn't meet one or all of the following crietria:

(1) some combination of abusive childhood experiences (emotional, physical, sexual)
(2) some form of psychic trauma in childhood or later life
(3) psychiatric drugging (particularly though not exclusively from a young age)

To my mind only the 3rd in that list could be said to be something that caused an actual measurable physical/neurological illness.

But of course that doesn't fulfill the criteria for a psychiatric diagnosis. So again, yes, that's another reason I'd consider it it be diagnonsense.

:)
 
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Jimbob`

Jimbob`

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 14, 2010
Messages
655
I like your neologism, Diagnonsense. It's a good pun.

I understand and appreciate all the reasons why many people desire a diagnosis and how socially useful these words can be.

However, personally, I'd go along with your coinage; it's diagnonsense.

It is my opinion that there really isn't any such thing as any of these so-called mental illnesses. People don't have bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia or depression. They have psychological struggles, difficulties and experience extremes of mood and pheneomena - but these aren't something they've caught. You don't catch an illness from being abused as a child. You don't catch an illness from being smacked in the face by a violent husband. You don't catch an illness from living in an alienated, paranoid, cruel and highly competitive capitalist society. You don't catch an illness from being frightened and made fearful by religion. You don't catch an illness from experiencing the horrors of war. You don't catch an illness from looking differently to the people around you, because of your colour, or your culture and being treated with suspicion and animosity.

You can make yourself unwell by over-using psychoactive drugs like alcohol, cannabis, caffeine, prozac or abilify. You can make yourself unwell by eating crappy food, not exercising, not drinking enough water.

But when you put a label on all this, I personally see it as far more damaging than it is helpful, especially if, like me, you don't buy into all this 'chemical imbalance/fixing' faith-based approaches with highly toxic drugs.

I think when they get people young, especially when they get people young, and start drugging them, many will go on to get bigger and bigger problems. So a person may start out with reactive depression - the drugs that are given to 'correct' that lead to damage that creates much worse episodes of clinical depression, drugs for which then lead to problems with mood regulation, sleep, weight, memory, learning etc. For many this all culminates in early onset dementia - so you have a steady curve upwards towards greater and greater dependency.

I don't mean to say that labels and drugs don't have their place. They obviously do have their place, because the reality is that psychiatry's current experiment is centred around these labels and these drugs. However, I would always encourage people to consider the dark side to all this faith-based medicine and have an eye always on the longer term implications of what a full initiation into the faith may have in store for them.

I have yet to meet anyone who has been diagnosed with a major label that doesn't meet one or all of the following crietria:

(1) some combination of abusive childhood experiences (emotional, physical, sexual)
(2) some form of psychic trauma in childhood or later life
(3) psychiatric drugging (particularly though not exclusively from a young age)

To my mind only the 3rd in that list could be said to be something that caused an actual measurable physical/neurological illness.

But of course that doesn't fulfill the criteria for a psychiatric diagnosis. So again, yes, that's another reason I'd consider it it be diagnonsense.

:)
I think very differently! Suffering from what is called bipolar disorder this is a very different experience to depression or anxiety or people with OCD. For people diagnosed with it the stories of their problems are very similar. It runs in families and there is strong evidence its appearance is influenced by genetics. And as for catching illnesses where does this idea come from who said these are caught? Maybe you are hung up on the word illness.

I dislike the term faith being used, medicine is evidence based, scientifically studied (albeit with problems with drug company research). I have read and studied a fair amount of psychology and read the DSM 4 and it does not seem unreasonable, there is no blind faith for me.
 
R

rabina

Guest
Diagnonsense....

Personally I believe that we all are struggling with psychological difficulties,experiences and phenomenon and that includes the medical profession who make up the diagnosis.
They are human beings also suffering with the very same psychological problems and it all falls into their hands when it comes to an individuals diagnosis; correct?
Well, all is not medically proven either. To my knowledge every living human being is "different" and unique just like a set of fingerprints; no 2 are alike.
Have all human brains been scanned with modern technology; no, they haven't nor can they be. Have all human beings complete life stories possibly be known; no they cannot and on and on....
If it makes one feel better to have a diagnosis so be it, but I believe we are all individuals just suffering everyday life issues from one extreme to the next.
Not all is or can ever be medically or scientifically proven I believe.
Some of us do have similar experiences with similar symptoms; perhaps that should be a diagnosis; S.E.W.S.S. Yes. I like it....whatever makes one feel better though.
 
R

rasselas

Guest
Maybe you are hung up on the word illness [...] I dislike the term faith being used.
Maybe you are hung up on the word faith! Come over to the Discussion area, my friend (Your Two Pence Worth). There are lots of us there with varying views and we'd welcome your input on debating these issues. It's all good n healthy to consider varying positions.

:)

Some of us do have similar experiences with similar symptoms; perhaps that should be a diagnosis; S.E.W.S.S. Yes. I like it....whatever makes one feel better though.
Yes, Rabina. S.E.W.S.S. It has a nice ring to it, I agree.

:)
 
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R

rabina

Guest
Diagnonsense....

Yes, I demand complete recognition and monetary compensation if S.E.W.S.S. get's put into the diagnonsense manual....;)
 
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