Fun game of magic controlling your tailbone wagging

Mr.NiceGuy

Mr.NiceGuy

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#1
Just at the moment when I'm starring blindly into space having a thought and the thought feels like it's ending or else delve to deep into it, instead of breaking out of the stare I can point to my pop can with a ghost gesture of my arm and the can will ping. I believe at the moment I start overthinking, or my mind crosses something I mull over a lot and have emotions over, that the stress in my ears changes to hold them steady and keep from getting dizzy as overthinking causes your tail to wag and dizzyness. This type of stress is sometimes vented well by causing a clicking noise in your surroundings.

This leads me to my game of shadow/click that I've been working on. The things that work well with this game by clicking or making a similar noise easily are: a porch roof, riding in a car, a house roof with rain, fireplace popping, any sound of a house creaking or settling, furnace systems. These things will work often and with ease. Other things that work seldomly are: a TV, a pop can, a window frame. It works by manually observing automatic changes in your focus, your breathing, and gestures, combined with voluntarily controlling those three things.

To get something sensitive to make a click or similar sound can be incredibly simple and done as often as wanted with sensitive surroundings. Physically pointing or looking at what you want to click never works. Using your mind to point works but how well depends on how sensitive the object is your trying to make click. Pointing with your mind takes place quickly but doesn't have to be done compulsively. The click will come almost simultaneously with you pointing at something or it won't come at all. Pointing incorrectly or trying to get sound from very insensitive surroundings can lead to a stress right where your balance system is in your head and give you anxiety. Pointing correctly involves intuition but also is easiest to point at something sensitive. You can point at something randomly or it can be significant. It's kind of associated with where you would like to draw attention in the room at the second. I point with my mind best using my hand to slightly draw focus to a spot in the room but you can use voluntary hallucinations to as well like sending your ghost out of your body.

If your in a non sensitive quiet room the game of shadow works easily. To start off while gazing into space, create a voluntary hallucination in your vision like an ant move on the ground, or a shadow in your vision move, or point to something with a dot, or even make dust or bugs fly through your vision, which is a little more rare, but can be done. Doing this will cause your tailbone to wag and/or dizzyness. Keeping calm and controlling your tailbone or dizzyness with voluntary breathing techniques allows you to get faster as you can't really do tricks very well when it starts swinging uncontrollably. The tailbone and dizzyness are used as a feedback measure in different ways. But the game works well without wagging in the first place. After making a stream of shadow hallucinations quickly you can loosen up your ears and make something click. If your not in a sensitive area to make a sound appear the game may seldomly work and only at emotionally strong moments of thought like the one described in the first paragraph.

Noisy surroundings pretty much drown out the game so no use even trying if the TV is real loud.

Naturally applying noise making in such a manner to your life will allow you to vent and keep calm and control over yourself getting dizzy or tail wagging instead of using gestures or changing focus or breathing differently.
 
boudreauj4

boudreauj4

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#2
You still have never explained how it's possible that your tailbone wags. My tailbone is buried in flesh and probably fat so it is stuck in place and has no room for movement. Do you feel a sensation like it is moving back and forth and call this wagging? I supposed there must be some muscle tissue down there around the tailbone so the muscles might possibly flex one way or the other in certain circumstances.....
 
Mr.NiceGuy

Mr.NiceGuy

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#3
You still have never explained how it's possible that your tailbone wags. My tailbone is buried in flesh and probably fat so it is stuck in place and has no room for movement. Do you feel a sensation like it is moving back and forth and call this wagging? I supposed there must be some muscle tissue down there around the tailbone so the muscles might possibly flex one way or the other in certain circumstances.....
I don't know. Some people say they can't feel it. It's not hard for me. I started wagging twice in the past minute since I started writing this post. I don't think muscle movement causes wagging. It's attached to you skeleton more specifically your spine. I feel the dizzyness in my ears alone sometimes and then focus on my tail and the dizzyness stops. But I can still feel it alone by itself without the dizzyness. What I'm secretly trying to do is find a cure for anxiety through feedback and controlling the tail. How am I doing?
 
Mr.NiceGuy

Mr.NiceGuy

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#5
Did you ever try neurofeedback?
Is it the same as biofeedback? I use a system of checking five senses in my head, me eyes, my ears, my nose, my mouth, and my balance system, then I check my cardiovascular, my musculoskeletal, and my gastro, then a quick check of my thingy, my bum, and my tail and I'm on my way. That's my biofeedback.
 
L

linus

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#6
Yes, some people call it biofeedback using the EEG "sensors" and eyes and ears are used for the feedback itself. I used it for my son for 20 sessions and it seems it helped him with his anxiety.
 
boudreauj4

boudreauj4

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#7
What you describe sounds a little different and unique but at least you are trying something to improve your condition. I wish you the best of luck with your endeavors.
 
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