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Five lifestyle factors are key to cutting risk of dementia, says charity

supergreysmoke

supergreysmoke

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Five lifestyle factors are key to cutting risk of dementia, says charity

Five lifestyle factors are key to cutting risk of dementia, says charity | Society | The Guardian

Five lifestyle factors are key to cutting risk of dementia, says charity

Lifestyle is responsible for up to 76% of changes in the ageing of the brain, according to Age UK, with key lifestyle changes having the potential to reduce the risk of developing dementia by as much as 36%.

Five actions that people can take to maintain brain health include regular physical exercise, a Mediterranean diet, not smoking, drinking in moderation and preventing diabetes, according to an evidence review by the charity.

About 850,000 people in the UK are living with dementia, which will affect one in three people over the age of 65, according to the latest estimates.

Physical exercise, such as aerobic, resistance or balance activity, was found to be the most effective way to ward off cognitive decline in healthy older people and to reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Studies suggested exercising three to five times a week for between 30 minutes and an hour was beneficial, it said.

There are significantly more new cases of Alzheimer’s among current smokers, compared with cases of people who have never smoked, the research indicated.

The review also backed claims suggesting very heavy drinking is linked to dementia, leading to loss of brain tissue, particularly in parts of the brain responsible for memory and processing, and interpreting visual information. Moderate levels of alcohol use, however, were found to protect brain tissue by increasing “good” cholesterol and lowering “bad” cholesterol.

One large UK study, done over 30 years, found men aged between 45 and 59 who followed four to five of the identified lifestyle factors, were found to have a 36% lower risk of developing cognitive decline and a 36% lower risk of developing dementia than those who did not.

(continued, good news for Christmas)
 
Kerome

Kerome

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It's always worth taking note of these things... Exercise is a good habit in any case, but it's useful to see this kind of reinforcing message which keeps telling you that you're doing the right thing with the long walks, the bicycle rides and the badminton playing :)
 
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Rose19602

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Thank you for the information and statistics. It's always interesting to hear about prevention.
x
 
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tommysmom

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I'm 75,caring for my M I son (he doesn't live with me but comes weekends ) I have my wine every night and this time of year maybe brandy instead. I'm beginning to think worrying about him and keeping myself safe and sane is warding off the big D. Or maybe not................
 
calypso

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Trouble is that dementia isn't one thing. Its a catch-all diagnosis for may types and many of them aren't improved by anything like this. Its really good advice for multi infarct dementia, which is caused by small strokes and furred up arteries. But Alzheimers, Lewey body, Frontal lobe, Huntington's disease and many more, this isn't caused by that. Korsakov's which is caused by alcoholism, certainly can be prevented of course.

I'm not trying to put a damper - do as much as you can and it can help immensely. But do be careful of titles which don't give the whole story. That said, research is getting much nearer to good treatments, especially for Alzheimers.
 
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