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Finding my new job really hard, think it's unfair.

D

DragonflyDreams

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Joined
Mar 9, 2015
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3
It's a long read but please try n help if you can, I will read your problems and offer any advice I can.

Before I went to University, I had about four jobs, and I loved each and every one. After returning from Uni I did a visual communication course and went freelance, but it was difficult to get work frequently enough to pay my rent and bills. Job availability in and around our town is much lower, and we have more jobless people than any other town in the area. It took me 6 months, during which time I got interviews almost every day, but for each one there was at least 200 other people applying. When I finally managed to get a 40 hour p/w catering job at a childcare centre, I was over the moon and raring to go.

I've been there 2 weeks, and I'm really struggling even though I've done catering before. It's just me and the chef, and she seemed nice at first but she tells me to do something, then when I do what she says it's always some how wrong e.g:

I buttered some toast for the children, she gave me a piece of paper with how many children are in each room, and said "Right if you see here, there's 18 toddlers, so just get 18 pieces and cut them into quaters, but for the rest of the rooms, just cut them into halves. She pointed out where it said the numbers of children in each room.

So, the juniors room said 23. I got 23 pieces of toast, and cut them into halves, put them on a tray and into the fridge. There were 38 in pre school, I got 38 pieces, cut into halves... continued for all the rooms. When I'd done them all, put them into the fridges, just before they had to go out she said "there isn't enough toast on these, did you put one and a half slices for each child?" I was like... what?? She never once said to use one and a half slices per child. I had to quickly rush to put them on and she got angry with me.

Another example, she told me the toddlers box had to have bibs in it, so I put 18 bibs, one for each toddler, into the box. When all boxes were done, I took them to the rooms and returned to the kitchen, and she said "you forgot to put bibs in the juniors box!" I didn't know there was supposed to be any bibs in the juniors box as she just said to put them in the toddlers, why wouldn't she say both? The juniors are like 6 years old... I wouldn't have guessed them to need bibs.

There are a few more examples. She will tell me to put knives and forks in the older childrens boxes (just plastic ones) then after I've done them for each room she will say "Why didn't you put any spoons in, some of the children can't use knives and forks they need at least ten spoons in each box." Like I'm stupid and I should know that.

She shouted at me on the 3rd day because I didn't record the temperature on the fridges properly, but I did record them I just couldn't find the actual folder because she hadn't shown me where it was (it was in a drawer somewhere else) so I wrote them down on a piece of paper.

The rules change every day, the boxes are all different every day, and I keep getting asked to do things I haven't been shown how to do. E.g I will go in and she says "Please mix the puree with the tinned tomatoes." and I'm like... where's the tinned tomatoes, how many tins should I use? Where's the puree? Which puree should I use? Do I mix it in the tins or in a bowl?" And whatever I do will be wrong. Like am I just dumb or something how am I supposed to know these things??
 
LORD BURT

LORD BURT

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Joined
Jul 8, 2013
Messages
34,886
Location
Mordor
Congratulations for your job first of all!

I think you are on a learning curve. In my last job the same thing happened to me. For the first 6 months I did not have a clue what was going on. With a learning curve, you will make mistakes, heck even your boss will make mistakes, but keep going, and eventually you will crack it.

You have nothing to lose, try your best in the job and you will find that you will become savvy in no time.

A sense of humor helps. Keep smiling, and wonder what will happen today??

Also keep to the basics in mind.. What is the purpose of your job? to make sure the kids are fed and happy. So err on the side of caution - put extra food if in doubt - make it more tasty. At least you can argue your case then. :)

I wish you best of luck with it.
 
S

Saranoya

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Joined
Jul 12, 2012
Messages
152
I think what's going on here is that the chef doesn't know what you do and don't know, because she hasn't taken the time to stop and think about it.

Either you're replacing someone who had been doing this job for years and didn't need to be told *how* to do things anymore, just *when* to do them (or perhaps not even that). Or, it's the first time she's worked with someone else and she's learning, as she goes, that as a "boss" of any kind, one can't simply expect other people to read minds.

It's a question of didactics, really. Some people are better at it than others. It seems that you've stumbled upon someone who may be good at what she does, but seems to be really bad at *explaining* to others what she does. She assumes that you know all these things not because you're supposed to know them, but because *she* knows them, and so to her, it seems like you should know them too.

I'd say, if you're unsure about something, just ask her. But you're still new enough that you probably don't even know what to ask. So it's not unlikely that you're just going to have to suffer her dissatisfaction for a few weeks, until you learn the right questions. For now, just watch, listen, and learn. Write down the rule every time she gives you one. If you run into a rule that seems to contradict one you've already written down, ask her about that.

I hope this helps at least a little bit.
 
pepecat

pepecat

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Jul 19, 2010
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middle earth
Write down the rule every time she gives you one. If you run into a rule that seems to contradict one you've already written down, ask her about that.
This was going to be my suggestion. Get yourself a little notebook and write stuff down as she tells you - where the bibs go, how many bits of toast the kids get, how to cut them up...... then if she tells you something different in the future you can say 'Well you said this last week, which one is it' but do it in a sort of 'I don't want to get this wrong so can you clarify' sort of way.

I started a new job in October, and there is a learning curve with these things. There always is. You don't know how they work, exactly what's expected of you, how they like things done..... but equally they can't expect you to mind-read your way through the day. They have to give you the info to do your job properly, and if they don't, then you need to ask.
 
katya

katya

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Dec 4, 2013
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2,052
Location
England
This was going to be my suggestion. Get yourself a little notebook and write stuff down as she tells you - where the bibs go, how many bits of toast the kids get, how to cut them up...... then if she tells you something different in the future you can say 'Well you said this last week, which one is it' but do it in a sort of 'I don't want to get this wrong so can you clarify' sort of way.

I started a new job in October, and there is a learning curve with these things. There always is. You don't know how they work, exactly what's expected of you, how they like things done..... but equally they can't expect you to mind-read your way through the day. They have to give you the info to do your job properly, and if they don't, then you need to ask.
That's a brilliant idea.

I feel for you; I used to work in a bar and there was no induction, so I got inconsistent instructions from different members of staff about how things are done and what needs to be done and when. I felt like a twat the entire time I was there because I was always pissing someone off.

Now I'm working as a teacher where things are much clearer (harder to achieve, but the instructions are at least clear) and I don't feel at all bad like I did working at the bar!!
 
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