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fear of dogs

R

RKWDLL

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Jul 10, 2019
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Location
East Lancashire
I was indifferent to dogs until I got one with my ex. Now I absolutely love them. You should try getting to know some. They really are better than people 😀
 
blacksmoke

blacksmoke

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Dec 26, 2015
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9,385
Location
basketville
indeed dogs are better than people just not the owner on the end of the lead!
 
soulsearcher

soulsearcher

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Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
2,842
I got bitten by a dog quite badly when I was a kid so I can understand your fears,
I'm not scared of dogs it's all about the owners and the way they bring up the dogs
 
Z

Zoe1

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Jul 8, 2019
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3,349
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Nowhere
thankyou all, yes Lunar Lady
said there are puppy socialising groups
where you can learn to love dogs
I will look into it sometime
although I dont know if I have the energy at the moment

x x x
 
Hwy2Well

Hwy2Well

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Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Messages
177
Location
West Coast
indeed dogs are better than people just not the owner on the end of the lead!
I tend to think dogs are more like people, in that most are good but there are some that are bad, no matter the owner. (Speaking from personal experience.) And just like people, some can have mental illness. Which is a bitch, so to speak.
 
Z

Zoe1

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a dog could have a mental illness ?
yes I had not thought of that
in fact my great aunts dog was thought of as a ' crazy dog '
by my aunt
whereas her dog was better behaved

apparently I liked both dogs
until the great aunts one knocked me down

ever since then I am nervous of them
and therefor they tend to go for me !
 
Hwy2Well

Hwy2Well

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Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Messages
177
Location
West Coast
a dog could have a mental illness ?
yes I had not thought of that
in fact my great aunts dog was thought of as a ' crazy dog '
by my aunt
whereas her dog was better behaved

apparently I liked both dogs
until the great aunts one knocked me down

ever since then I am nervous of them
and therefor they tend to go for me !
Sure they can. I fostered one dog who had separation anxiety -- like to a dangerous extent. She was a beautiful, sweet girl who took to training well, but leave her for 5 minutes alone and she'd pee all over (from intense fear), and she'd do anything to get out to find you. Working with a trainer over months we slowly crate trained her which seemed to be working (I could crate her & leave the room). So one day I left to go to the store. When I returned 20minutes later I found her bloodied and in a frightening state of panic. She had torn off a couple nails from frantic pawing at the cage and her mouth was torn up from her trying to bite thru the metal bars.

Everyone got involved. While we worked on the issue we had to hire "babysitters" to sit with the dog if ever we couldn't take her with us. (Surprisingly she was fine being left in the car.) Our vet finally prescribed her Xanax. I gave her the least amt, tested her reaction to being left alone and she promptly started a panic attack. Per the vet's advice I gave her another dose. Same thing. I gave her one final dose (the vet saying anymore could kill her) and it was nothing to her.

Not really knowing what Xanax was at the time I just figured it was a fairly impotent drug and stowed the prescription away. Fast forward a year later and I had what I can only think was a genuine panic attack. I was alone and in fear I would pass out because I couldn't stop hyperventilating. I found this prescription and out of sheer mindless panic I took one tablet. Within a few minutes everything slooo.oooweddd waaayyyy
dooowwwww.....nnnnnn. I felt myself sinking and sinking. Anyway I kept slowing down so much I worried I had just killed myself with a drug overdose.
The reason why I bring up my irresponsible drug taking story is to illustrate just how bad it was for this dog. She had taken 3x what I had -- and I outweighed her by 50lbs -- and it didn't scratch the surface of her anxiety. That's not normal.
 
Z

Zoe1

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3,349
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wow yes I can feel a little sympathy for the dog in your story
and you know what I'm a tiny bit less irritated by the neighbours dog !
just a little bit the pain is eased when it barks
maybe there is a part of me that goes way back to before I was hit
by my great aunts dog
 
Hwy2Well

Hwy2Well

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Messages
177
Location
West Coast
wow yes I can feel a little sympathy for the dog in your story
and you know what I'm a tiny bit less irritated by the neighbours dog !
just a little bit the pain is eased when it barks
maybe there is a part of me that goes way back to before I was hit
by my great aunts dog
Actually, I can't stand a barking dog. It's a menace to one's sanity, no matter the reason. I had one of those too (also separation anxiety, but to a way lesser extent). I read dozens of behavior training books, tried all the passive training methods and couldn't crack the case. Reluctantly, I resorted to a shock collar that would zap him after a warning beep when he barked more the once over a few seconds. It made me cry the first time I heard him yelp after a zap but no more than 30 minutes later he got the message. After a few months we didn't use the collar at all and he remained cured.

I was in danger of being evicted so while I hated using that method, I can't deny that the anguish in the short term paid off in the long run.

Anyway, have you contacted the owner? Does the owner know the dog is incessantly barking?
 
Z

Zoe1

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Nowhere
wow that was really difficult to discipline the dog in that way
sorry for your pain going through that ...
yes we have had a long running dispute about it
involving the council as well
and they also involved the council some years back
when I was having a relapse with my mental health
I think the council have done quite a good job actually
but some evenings there is a lot of barking

I dont know what they have done to stop it
but its much better than it was
 
Hwy2Well

Hwy2Well

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Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Messages
177
Location
West Coast
wow that was really difficult to discipline the dog in that way
sorry for your pain going through that ...
yes we have had a long running dispute about it
involving the council as well
and they also involved the council some years back
when I was having a relapse with my mental health
I think the council have done quite a good job actually
but some evenings there is a lot of barking

I dont know what they have done to stop it
but its much better than it was
As you speak of "council" it's clear I'm unfamiliar with laws you have wherever you are regarding menace barking. Actually, even here there are varying degrees of enforcement, tho typically it falls under the same type rules as having a band practice in your apt at 1 in the morning. Here, you can be cited for not curbing your dog's behavior.

I'm glad it's better. As for training aids, there are new collars out that don't shock but squirt. After a warning the dog will be squirt in the face with some offensive spray (forget now the scent). The trick is to change the dog's focus -- to re-wire an instinct or behavioral tic. Anyway, if you were more friendly with your neighbor that could be a suggestion. Honestly tho the shock collar isn't as medieval as it sounds. I tried it on my bare skin and it jolted me but didn't "hurt" per se. And think how the dog has a fur barrier so it was less of a zap than I got.
 
Z

Zoe1

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Messages
3,349
Location
Nowhere
south UK
I'm surprised if its treated the same as a band practice
certainly it is just as loud
but I got the impression dog noise was considered more ' normal '
is the impression I got from the dog warden

im glad to hear that the dog is not given too much pain
yes a smell would be better, nobody likes to see an animal suffer
I think thats partly what disturbs me about the barking
is that the animal sounds distressed
maybe because its kept in all day

and I would be distressed if I was kept in all day !
 
Hwy2Well

Hwy2Well

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Messages
177
Location
West Coast
wow yes I can feel a little sympathy for the dog in your story
and you know what I'm a tiny bit less irritated by the neighbours dog !
just a little bit the pain is eased when it barks
maybe there is a part of me that goes way back to before I was hit
by my great aunts dog
I kind of overlooked the lead on this. Sorry. Clearly, I could dogs all day. But this isn't a dedicated dog forum.

Do you want to expand on this epiphany? (Or am I just misinterpreting the importance here...)
 
Z

Zoe1

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Messages
3,349
Location
Nowhere
well the reason I posted about it
is because I'm aware that I have an issue with dogs
that goes back to 4 years old and I'm wondering if I can cure it
and that is probably possible
 
Hwy2Well

Hwy2Well

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Messages
177
Location
West Coast
wow that was really difficult to discipline the dog in that way
sorry for your pain going through that ...
yes we have had a long running dispute about it
involving the council as well
and they also involved the council some years back
when I was having a relapse with my mental health
I think the council have done quite a good job actually
but some evenings there is a lot of barking

I dont know what they have done to stop it
but its much better than it was
Crate training is a good first step. Dogs like a "den" -- a safe enclosed space. It's in their DNA. Some people think it's cruel to keep dogs in cages when they're away. The dogs don't. They generally take to the concept even if this method is introduced later in life. My dog puts himself to bed in his crate. I don't even close it anymore. Many bad habits are taken care of by employing this.

And I remembered the squirt collar scent was citrus. I couldn't speak to its efficacy as I've never used one.
 
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