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ESA New Scoring System for substantial risk (suicide)

SarahD

SarahD

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New scoring system for ESA substantial risk

New scoring system for ESA substantial risk


Category: Latest news
Created: Wednesday, 25 February 2015 01:18
A new scoring system has been created to decide if claimants with mental health issues can get into the support group because of a risk of harm to themselves or someone else. The system has been deliberately designed to make it more difficult for women to qualify than men.

There have also been important changes to the way health professionals estimate how far claimants can walk or ‘mobilise’.esa mental health guide cover

SUBSTANTIAL RISK
The substantial risk regulations are now one of the most important ways of getting into the support group.

According to the independent reviewer of the WCA, Dr Paul Litchfield, 38% of all new support group entries are on substantial risk grounds . Two thirds of these are decided on the papers alone, without the need for a medical assessment.

The regulations apply where a claimant has not qualified for the support group, but where it is then decided that there would be a substantial risk to the claimant or to someone else unless they are found to be incapable of work-related activity.

HARDER FOR WOMEN
Until now there has been no difference in how men and women are assessed.

However, Benefits and Work can reveal that a new scoring system deliberately makes it harder for women to qualify for the support group than for men.

For example, a man with a diagnosis of depression and a history of deliberate self-harm who is unemployed – generally the case for ESA claimants – will be eligible for the support group, according to the guidance.

But a woman in the same situation will not be eligible for the support group. Instead, she will have to also show that an additional factor – such as being homeless or divorced –applies to her.

The gender difference is likely to be based on the fact that more males than females commit suicide.

Indeed, figures released by the Office for National Statistics just last week showed that suicide rates are now at their highest in over a decade and most of the increase is amongst men. Organisations such as Mind are linking the rise to benefits cuts.

However, many people would question whether a difference in suicide rates is sufficient to justify different treatment for men and women in relation to claiming benefits. This is particularly the case because substantial risk is not just about deliberate self-harm or suicide, but also about issues such as unintentional self-neglect.
 
Toasted Crumpet

Toasted Crumpet

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Can see this opening a can of worms, you are going to get the "society is misandrist" lot on in a while.

I don't see what women being divorced has to do with it.

Oh well, best get the popcorn for this one too

Thanks for posting
 
SarahD

SarahD

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I think this thing about changing the rules for points on ESA about substantial risk (suicide) is not about men and women (cos let's face it, the government hate the unemployed and unemployable equally , regardless of gender. It is about saving money. It is just the way they are going about it does treat people unequally.

Men are more likely to succeed at suicide (because they tend to choose more lethal methods) whereas more women make the attempt. While some may be the cry for help, who is going to judge that? People who make even those types of attempts are more likely to succeed at suicide in the long run. Ultimately suicidal people may suffer to a great extent and be unable to work, whatever their gender. (While those who succeed are well off out of it. My personal opinion, being suicidal.)

The article does make the point that another substantial risk is self neglect, I am not sure who would suffer most from that.
 
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