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Environment Predicts Schizophrenia Risk Better than Genes

cpuusage

cpuusage

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Environment Predicts Schizophrenia Risk Better than Genes | Mad In America

We should focus more on reducing or preventing specific environmental and lifestyle risk factors for schizophrenia, because genetic risk factors have no predictive capability whatsoever, according to a study in The Lancet Psychiatry.

The team of German researchers studied 750 male patients diagnosed with schizophrenia for whom they had genetic information as well as extensive background and clinical information about factors such as marijuana use, brain injuries, and traumatic experiences. They drew on the latest studies of genes and schizophrenia, and then evaluated which information was more useful for predictive purposes. “Specifically, we investigated the potential effect of schizophrenia risk alleles as identified in the most recent large genome-wide association study versus the effects of environmental hazards (ie, perinatal brain insults, cannabis use, neurotrauma, psychotrauma, urbanicity, and migration), alone and upon accumulation, on age at disease onset, age at prodrome, symptom expression, and socioeconomic parameters,” they wrote.

They found that environmental factors became a significant predictor of schizophrenia as the number, frequency and intensity of those factors increased. In contrast, they found that genetic risk factors “did not have any detectable effects.”

“These findings should be translated to preventive measures to reduce environmental risk factors, since age at onset of schizophrenia is a crucial determinant of an affected individual’s fate and the total socioeconomic cost of the illness,” the researchers concluded.

(Abstract) Accumulated environmental risk determining age at schizophrenia onset: a deep phenotyping-based study (Stepniak, Beata et al. The Lancet Psychiatry. November 2014. doi: 10.1016/S2215-0366(14)70379-7)
 
BillFish

BillFish

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November 26, 2014

Environment Predicts Schizophrenia Risk Better than Genes | Mad In America

We should focus more on reducing or preventing specific environmental and lifestyle risk factors for schizophrenia, because genetic risk factors have no predictive capability whatsoever, according to a study in The Lancet Psychiatry.

The team of German researchers studied 750 male patients diagnosed with schizophrenia for whom they had genetic information as well as extensive background and clinical information about factors such as marijuana use, brain injuries, and traumatic experiences. They drew on the latest studies of genes and schizophrenia, and then evaluated which information was more useful for predictive purposes. “Specifically, we investigated the potential effect of schizophrenia risk alleles as identified in the most recent large genome-wide association study versus the effects of environmental hazards (ie, perinatal brain insults, cannabis use, neurotrauma, psychotrauma, urbanicity, and migration), alone and upon accumulation, on age at disease onset, age at prodrome, symptom expression, and socioeconomic parameters,” they wrote.

They found that environmental factors became a significant predictor of schizophrenia as the number, frequency and intensity of those factors increased. In contrast, they found that genetic risk factors “did not have any detectable effects.”

“These findings should be translated to preventive measures to reduce environmental risk factors, since age at onset of schizophrenia is a crucial determinant of an affected individual’s fate and the total socioeconomic cost of the illness,” the researchers concluded.

(Abstract) Accumulated environmental risk determining age at schizophrenia onset: a deep phenotyping-based study (Stepniak, Beata et al. The Lancet Psychiatry. November 2014. doi: 10.1016/S2215-0366(14)70379-7)
That's logical enough, as not all people with risk factor genes become mentally ill, and also the illness can be expressed in many different ways, from bipolar to bpd.And the fact that the way genes interact with the environment is not yet fully understood, and so allows some juicy and profitable surmising in the information void, for many years to come in fact, until we are offered conclusive science based proof of concept.:p
 
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firemonkee57

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That's logical enough, as not all people with risk factor genes become mentally ill,
Then again not all people with trauma or other environmental triggers become mentallly ill. It seems to be a complex interplay of genes and environment that's needed.
 
supergreysmoke

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Genetics is over-played with high order behavioural stuff. A computer prog can be reduced to 1s and 0s. When the prog is photoshop and what is going wrong is high level in the flow activity then a reductionist approach will get you no where. Genes might be doing stuff, so what, the CPU does stuff too when I listen to Beethoven. It might be important...every Van Gogh has a canvas...no clue to Van Gogh in the canvas.
 
cpuusage

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Genetics is over-played with high order behavioural stuff. A computer prog can be reduced to 1s and 0s. When the prog is photoshop and what is going wrong is high level in the flow activity then a reductionist approach will get you no where. Genes might be doing stuff, so what, the CPU does stuff too when I listen to Beethoven. It might be important...every Van Gogh has a canvas...no clue to Van Gogh in the canvas.
Yup -

BBC News - Real life experiences influence schizophrenia, says report

A report published on Thursday challenges received wisdom about the nature of mental illness. Many people believe that schizophrenia is a frightening brain disease that makes people unpredictable and can only be controlled by medication.

However, research conducted over the last 20 years and brought together in this report suggests this view is false. It raises wider 'nature vs. nurture' questions about whether conditions such as depression and schizophrenia are genetic, or whether real life experiences are more influential.

Today programme presenter John Humphrys spoke to Anne Cooke, editor of the report, and Niall Boyce, editor of The Lancet Psychiatry journal.
 
supergreysmoke

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Experiences trigger or delay changes, maybe at pivotal times of growth it isn't a good idea to smoke pot and do anything that'll risk a head injury or emotional trauma? Maybe those who have illness in the family should be identified and excused the stress of exams - and be marked via coursework?
 
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i can't say i'm impressed by ideas of the role of expensive 50 pounds an hour therapists in helping, the nhs ain't likely to agree to that given the cost constraints
 
supergreysmoke

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i can't say i'm impressed by ideas of the role of expensive 50 pounds an hour therapists in helping, the nhs ain't likely to agree to that given the cost constraints
What about acupuncture sessions?
 
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ramboghettouk

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i think the occasional acupuncture session does more good than some psychotherapist, the nhs has been clear they don;t think acupuncture worth spending money on
 
supergreysmoke

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i think the occasional acupuncture session does more good than some psychotherapist, the nhs has been clear they don;t think acupuncture worth spending money on
I can do it for free out of curiosity, see what it does...
 
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ramboghettouk

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maybe it's like all therapys it's the personality of the therapist thats important not the type of therapy, thats why i'm impressed by this chinese women, also my gp at one point arranged for her to offer private acupuncture at his surgery so it's got his endorsement, reminds me i'll have to contact her, she'll probably be going back to china for xmas
 
supergreysmoke

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Do you ever talk politics, or just the woo? China has a appalling history of human rights abuses. She might not know about 1989? might be helping lots of folks if you spent the time wisely? There's a firewall around China keeping the truth out, you are a breach in that firewall if you speak up?
 
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