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Double Exposure.

Rorschach

Rorschach

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I had a meeting with a friend last night, during which I explained my experience and perception of my periods of illness, juxtaposed my periods of wellness underlined by a diagnosis of mental illness.

My friend was asking what it was like when I had been at my worst. He himself has just undergone a major turmoil in that he nearly sank his design company as a result of having bad habits and access to the company bank account. At the end of his drama he said he had felt a sense of fractured ego akin to what he perceived as mental illness.

I used a metaphor I have used before and thought it might be of interest to some here. In photography, there is a method of developing film called 'double exposure'. This requires that when you put the negative on the enlarger (the piece of kit to get the image onto photographic paper), rather than putting one negative, you put two. The result is that you end up with two images merged, I'll see if I can find an image on google...Actually found one that will do brilliantly....


There's a whole heap of narratives you could write to explain the image. Rather than merely suggesting that voices or visual distortions are delusional, I'm trying to suggest that people inhabit more than one place, perhaps in actuality, or more likely in perception of reality. To write a narrative for the picture; reality is perceived from two (or more) perspectives, potentially with different or contradictory opinions. With this in mind the potential conflict within the mind (or experienced as external) seems to be a manifestation of a multifaceted character (rather like a diamond ;) ) as opposed to merely the fracturing of a personality...
 
Isobel

Isobel

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Hello Rorschach,
That is a very interesting idea, and potentially a starter for lots of artwork. When I used to do a life drawing class I sometimes put one drawing on top of another so that there were different aspects of the same person on the paper. An interesting thing about this is that all the drawings had an impact on the others in terms of colour, spacing, sizing, which was on the top etc.
Something I've done more recently is to take a life drawing and incorporate it into a scaled up drawing of a geode so that it's quite hard to see the figure and hard to tell where geode begins and figure ends. I'm now thinking of using trees similarly.
Do you do any art? You've certainly got the imagination.
Isobel
 
Rorschach

Rorschach

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I used to draw, in fact this weekend my 6 year old daughter found a watercolour I had done of a hare's head when I was 15 and was most impressed ;)
 
midnight

midnight

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I have been thinking about this type of stuff for a while and I strongly believe that the role of the 'central executive' in the brain has alot to answer for. Essentially the brain is split into lots of bits and the 'central executive' is the bit ( as I understand it) that co-ordinates our understanding and reaction to the outside world. If this is messed up in some way you could see how even if every other part of the brain worked well our perception ofstuff might be abit skewed.

Thougths?
 
D

Dollit

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A guy I did some psychology with once said that he thought I loved cubism so much because of the "fractured mirror" effect, that mental ill health fractures our minds and that we can make more sense of the multiple images of the world because our minds potentially work on more levels at the same time. It makes perfect sense. Also I can look at work by van Gogh and see the image he was painting - I don't know if that makes sense to you but it does to me.
 
Rorschach

Rorschach

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I have been thinking about this type of stuff for a while and I strongly believe that the role of the 'central executive' in the brain has alot to answer for. Essentially the brain is split into lots of bits and the 'central executive' is the bit ( as I understand it) that co-ordinates our understanding and reaction to the outside world. If this is messed up in some way you could see how even if every other part of the brain worked well our perception ofstuff might be abit skewed.

Thougths?
Sorry about the tardy reply, I read the post earlier but have been in bed not feeling too well. You might be right about the dominant part of the brain being taken as 'me' to the expense of more peripheral parts? Is that what you meant? Or do you mean that a problem with the CPU ;) renders the rest of the brain faulty? If either/or or both, they are both interesting thoughts to consider. Might it be that are perceptual 'centres' in other parts of the brain other than the 'central executive', and that if the hierarchy breaks down there is a tangible perceptual conflict??
 
Rorschach

Rorschach

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A guy I did some psychology with once said that he thought I loved cubism so much because of the "fractured mirror" effect, that mental ill health fractures our minds and that we can make more sense of the multiple images of the world because our minds potentially work on more levels at the same time. It makes perfect sense. Also I can look at work by van Gogh and see the image he was painting - I don't know if that makes sense to you but it does to me.
The world certainly works at a more complex level than mundane perception operates. In fact if one was looking at the world at more than the customary levels it could be quite unpleasant on a couple of levels, not least being social interaction/integration. :unsure:
 
midnight

midnight

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Loads of interesting concpets and ideas coming out here.

I think, and I only think i meant this : the central executive 'makes sense' of all the inputs soming into the head and interprets what you see.

As I understand it the middle of the brain (lump at the top of the spinal chord) is the oldest bit of the brain it makes your heart beat and you breath etc stuff you don't have to think about

Then there are the more complex bits that give and receive bodily signals like talking hearing moving seeing

But the most complex bit it the bit that processes all the information going in and out of the body and makes sense of the world.

When I think about things and look at what happens to me, I don't think that its the giving and receiving of information that going wrong I think its the most complex bit that interprets my world that could use a sticky plaster!

I not sure this theory total explains postive elements of psychosis (such as hearing things and seeing things that are apparently not there) so mt theory is still in draft format at the moment!!!
 
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