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Dopamine -dependant side effects of SSRIs

R

Rose19602

Guest
I have been researching some of the side effects I had whilst on Escitalopram, and found this.

A year or so ago, when I was either taking citalopram or withdrawing from it....can't remember which, I developed mastitis (breast inflammation / infection of the milk ducts.) It's very unusual in a 49 year old woman who is not breast feeding and whose children are 17!

I also had other side effects from these SSRIs which are normally seen as responses to the anti-psychotics, including suspected akinesia (inability to inititate muscles/nerves & associated movement).

Has anyone else experienced anything like this?

I enclose one item of research but there are others that support it.....

"Dopamine-dependent" side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a clinical review.

Source:Department of Psychiatry, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

OBJECTIVE:
Neurophysiologic findings indicate an inhibition of dopaminergic neurotransmission by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This article highlights the relationships between changes in dopaminergic neurotrans-mission induced by SSRIs and the occurrence of certain side effects such as hyperprolactinemia, extrapyramidal symptoms, sexual and cognitive dysfunction, galactorrhea, mammary hypertrophy, and, more rarely, gynecomastia. *

* prolactin - the hormone that stimulates the milk glands
mammary hypertrophy - breast enlargement
galactorrhea - the spontaneous flow of milk from the breast
gynecomastia - breast development in males
extrapyramidal symptoms - A group of side effects associated with
antipsychotic medications (includes parkinsonism, akathisia, dystonia, and
tardive dyskinesia.)

DATA SOURCES AND SELECTION:
A systematic search of the literature in English, French, and German from 1980 to 2004 was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library using the keywords SSRI, dopamine, serotonin, side effects, antidepressants, citalopram, escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and nefazodone. References cited in all trials were searched iteratively to identify missing studies. All studies concerning inhibition of dopaminergic neurotransmission by SSRIs and SSRI-related side effects were considered. We retained 62 significant articles debating the subject.

DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS:
We critically reviewed the studies, depending on the methodologies (case reports, clinical reports, randomized studies), and assessed the pertinence of "dopamine-dependent" SSRI-related side effects. The analytic review of these articles suggests that some specific SSRI-related side effects be classified as dopamine-dependent.

CONCLUSIONS:
At a clinical level, it could be useful to underline dopamine-dependent characteristics of some SSRI-related side effects. This approach would allow clinicians the opportunity to search other dopamine-dependent side effects systematically. At a pharmacologic level, this approach could stimulate the development of molecules with a "corrective" function on dopamine-dependent side effects of SSRIs by facilitating dopaminergic neurotransmission.
PMID: 15323590 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 
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At a clinical level, it could be useful to underline dopamine-dependent characteristics of some SSRI-related side effects. This approach would allow clinicians the opportunity to search other dopamine-dependent side effects systematically.
Yes. Would be useful to find out what these things do before we conduct a multi-generation experiment with them.

Truth is no one knows exactly how they effect us. They know a small proportion, and what we receive is marketing information. Yet survivors accounts are dismissed on this basis that it shouldn't be happening. But they don't know what should be happening, and they don't report what they don't already know. The Doctors and Psychiatry are complicit in the great deception by Big Pharma. And not much happens when it is reported.

At a pharmacologic level, this approach could stimulate the development of molecules with a "corrective" function on dopamine-dependent side effects of SSRIs by facilitating dopaminergic neurotransmission.
That's the mindset. Give everyone drugs even though we don't know what they do. If we ever find out what they do give them another drug to counteract the adverse effects and start the process again with this second one - because we won't know what that one does exactly, nor will we know how they react to being used together over long periods till we do that for long periods.

How about re-evaluating if SSRI's (and other psychiatric drugs) actually do improve lives and how and when and if we ever use them?? A lot of things that would be much more useful we don't even do at all.


_____



Sexual dysfunction is very common on antidepressants. But all these drugs do a lot of damage and because we don't know exactly how they effect the body it is often difficult to pinpoint how they do what people notice. We also don't fully know the knock on effects of how they effect the body then effects other systems within it. They cause a lot of things but we don't really know how they create them exactly.

Lot of people have had restlessness and involuntary movements too. Which does suggest dopamine blockade effects. They've known all this for ages, they knew all this over 15 years ago at the very least. They just won't acknowledge the scale or that it's happening. A lot of "rare side effects" aren't rare at all. They also seem to think the vast majority of stuff will go away as your body becomes used to it, not so true as they think.

It's like atypical antipsychotics. Once you're messing with dopamine as well as serotonergic, and a combination or all from adrenergic, cholinergic and histaminergic receptors there's practically nothing you can't **** up. Yet on the basis of 6 - 12 week trials they'll say it's not happening no matter how long you've been on them.

We have nothing like the full story on them which is why reporting side effects (to things like the yellow card system and https://www.rxisk.org/Default.aspx)is so important. The regulatory bodies are failing people, they don't do what we think they do. Doctors don't take what you tell them further. It's time to build mechanisms where we do this stuff ourselves outside the present co-opted system, which is what rxisk.org attempts to do.

It's important stuff. People deserve the full facts so they can make informed decisions and have their adverse effects to medication recognised as such rather than diagnosed as expressions of "mental illness" or freak occurrences when these things are happening on a massive scale.
 
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