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Does your OCD increase at important junctures

R

rbrt85

New member
Joined
Jan 19, 2015
Messages
4
Does your OCD accelerate whenever you have to make important decisions? I am having this problem currently and it's at a 9/10 which has been the worst since graduating college in 2008 (currently 29).

Is there anyway to help cope with this? It is taking up around 70% of my day currently just making sure everything is in order and worrying about my phobias.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I'm new to the forum so it's nice to see a place where other people suffer from similar problems.

:clap:
 
Purple Chaos

Purple Chaos

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 23, 2014
Messages
1,079
Hi rbrt85 and welcome to the forum.

Stress can be one hell of a trigger for OCD symptoms. I found this online. I don't know if it will help or not:

Four Steps for Conquering Symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Psychiatrist Jeffrey Schwartz, author of Brain Lock: Free Yourself from Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior, offers the following four steps for dealing with OCD:

RELABEL – Recognize that the intrusive obsessive thoughts and urges are the result of OCD. For example, train yourself to say, "I don't think or feel that my hands are dirty. I'm having an obsession that my hands are dirty." Or, "I don't feel that I have the need to wash my hands. I'm having a compulsive urge to perform the compulsion of washing my hands."
REATTRIBUTE – Realize that the intensity and intrusiveness of the thought or urge is caused by OCD; it is probably related to a biochemical imbalance in the brain. Tell yourself, "It's not me—it’s my OCD," to remind you that OCD thoughts and urges are not meaningful, but are false messages from the brain.
REFOCUS – Work around the OCD thoughts by focusing your attention on something else, at least for a few minutes. Do another behavior. Say to yourself, "I'm experiencing a symptom of OCD. I need to do another behavior."
REVALUE – Do not take the OCD thought at face value. It is not significant in itself. Tell yourself, "That's just my stupid obsession. It has no meaning. That's just my brain. There's no need to pay attention to it." Remember: You can't make the thought go away, but neither do you need to pay attention to it. You can learn to go on to the next behavior.

There is quite a lot of additional information on the website, which can be found here. The self-help area can be found if you scroll down the page.
 
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rbrt85

New member
Joined
Jan 19, 2015
Messages
4
Thanks for the advice. I will try to focus on those four steps.
 
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